Does CPF (Brazilian Portuguese) need to be translated into English on an academic transcript?
Thread poster: Natalie Thomas
Natalie Thomas
New Zealand
Local time: 18:39
Portuguese to English
Jan 22

I am working on a university transcript and I am unsure if I need to translate CPF as it is an abbreviation. Should it stay as CPF or become TAX ID?

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José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 03:39
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Some explanation is required Jan 22

In Brazilian sworn translations PT>EN, I put:
Individual Taxpayer ID [CPF] XXX.XXX.XXX-XX

(Your profile is bare, I have no idea on how much you know about Brazil.)
Anyway, for general information, if anyone ever searches for it.

Nobody outside Brazil is expected to know what's a CPF.

In Brazil, it's the only UNIQUE (there are NO repeated numbers, all follow the XX... format above) federal identification everyone must have after a certain age. And anyone can have it, no need to be Brazilian, no need to live in Brazil, in fact, no need to ever set foot in Brazil to have one. And also no need to actually pay any taxes in Brazil. It is possible to get a CPF overseas through the local Brazilian consulate. For Brazilians at home, it is possible to get it online in maybe 5 minutes, at any post office, and also at some governmental agencies.

Until years ago, the Ministry of Finance issued CPF cards. No photo, no details whatsoever beyond the individual's full name and their CPF number. Now the user goes online, and can print as many of their cards as they wish.

While Brazilians must have a CPF number after the age of 14, I recently learned that a newborn, being a child of foreign parents accidentally visiting Brazil when delivery took place, upon registration, is automatically assigned a CPF.

It is the safest way to tell apart one "José da Silva" from another "José da Silva" (the Brazilian "John Doe"). The CPF is the number that will prevent one person having exactly the same name as another from using their credentials.

We do have ID cards, called "RG" (for Registro Geral = General Register), however these are statewide, so it's necessary to mention the issuing state. It is possible for different people have the same RG number, issued by different states. And yet, some other IDs are just as good for identification purposes, e.g. military IDs, as well as professional board IDs (e.g. doctors, lawyers, engineers). These RG cards have the individual's details, such as birth date and place, parents' names, photo, thumbprint, and the bearer's signature.

Yet the most practical photo ID to use in Brazil is the driver's license, as it also has the individual's RG number, and optionally the CPF too. However it is exclusive to licensed drivers; we don't have ID-only driver' licenses like I've seen in the USA.

Now you may ask: why "individual" taxpayer?
That's because there is also the Corporate Taxpayer ID - format is XX.XXX.XXX/YYYY-ZZ - which is called CNPJ. That's only for legal entities after they get legally established in Brazil, not for people.


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You don't need to. Jan 22

If you are addressing a Brazilian audience then you dont need to. Now, if you are addressing a big broader audience that en-globes the general public. Then yeah, even while you translate make references and examples and even include something as CPF = SSN in case you are addressing Americans.

[Editado em 2017-01-22 20:12 GMT]


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José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 03:39
English to Portuguese
+ ...
CPF ≠ SSN Jan 22

GustavoWoltman wrote:

If you are addressing a Brazilian audience then you dont need to. Now, if you are addressing a big broader audience that en-globes the general public. Then yeah, even while you translate make references and examples and even include something as CPF = SSN in case you are addressing Americans.


While Americans are scared stiff of having their SSN disclosed, due to the risk of identity theft, the CPF in Brazil is spread wide open; it is printed on every check issued by an individual (company checks have the CNPJ instead).

I think it's unlikely Natalie will be addressing a Brazilian audience in English.


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Natalie Thomas
New Zealand
Local time: 18:39
Portuguese to English
TOPIC STARTER
thank you Jan 22

Hi José

I created my profile a short time ago so I still have much to add! Thank you for your informed reply. I do know about CPF as in fact I have one. I lived in Brazil and my husband is Brazilian. I didn't know however that it must translate to "individual" taxpayer. That is some really great information. I appreciate it!

Obrigada





[Edited at 2017-01-22 21:56 GMT]


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Does CPF (Brazilian Portuguese) need to be translated into English on an academic transcript?

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