Academic papers: in-line citations of translated quotes
Thread poster: Sarah Hirsch

Sarah Hirsch  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 20:28
Member (2014)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Apr 6

I just translated an academic paper on economics, along with various citations within the text. How do I mention this in the in-line citations? For example, would my translated text be: "blah de blah is really cool" (Doe 123, translation by author)? Do I get credit? My client told me that in Spanish it would be "traducción propia", which makes sense, but doesn't translate idiomatically in this context. Any thoughts? Thanks!

 

Michael Wetzel  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 03:28
German to English
Easy with footnotes/endnotes Apr 6

I almost never work with in-line citations, because they are very uncommon in my field. In notes, it's easy, you just add "All translations by Sarah Hirsch, unless otherwise noted," at the end of the first note citing the source of a translated quotation. Because your readers have the title of the cited source in each note, it's easy for them to recognize whether or not a given quotation has been translated.

I suppose you could just add the same comment inside the parentheses at the end of the first quotation: Readers who are interested enough to care whether a given quotation is translated or not can flip to the bibliography at the end of the text to see the title of the cited source.


 

Teresa Borges
Portugal
Local time: 02:28
Member (2007)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
One question Apr 6

Were all citations translated by you, or some by you and others by the author?

 

Tina Vonhof
Canada
Local time: 19:28
Member (2006)
Dutch to English
+ ...
Translation in brackets Apr 7

In the case of inline citations, I usually put: ("Original title, year") [translation of title]. The brackets already indicate that this was added by the translator and no further mention of it is necessary (no credit).

Economics falls under social sciences where inline citations are common. Most follow APA style. You can find their publication manual online at http://www.apa.org/


 

Sarah Hirsch  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 20:28
Member (2014)
Spanish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Sole Translator Apr 7

Teresa Borges wrote:

Were all citations translated by you, or some by you and others by the author?


All of them were by me.


 

Teresa Borges
Portugal
Local time: 02:28
Member (2007)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
@Sarah Apr 8

Sarah Hirsch wrote:

Teresa Borges wrote:

Were all citations translated by you, or some by you and others by the author?


All of them were by me.


This might answer your question:

http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2014/11/lost-in-translation-citing-your-own-translations-in-apa-style.html


 

Nikki Scott-Despaigne  Identity Verified
Local time: 03:28
French to English
Translations of in-text citations Apr 8

Teresa makes an important point, although I am uncertain that the APA is actually the reference for economic aacdemic writing. I think that Harvard may be more common. You may like to check with the client, who may need to check with the editor.

 

Michael Wetzel  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 03:28
German to English
Link to APA-blog very interesting Apr 9

Chicago's FAQs (or Q&As) suggests using "my translation" in the situation you've described (see, e.g. http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Documentation/faq0030.html).
That's a very helpful solution for translators, because it fits nicely with the standard expression in a lot of foreign languages. It seems short enough for repeated use in parentheses. On the other hand, if it seems to be unnecessarily cluttering up the page, the information seems more or less redundant if a foreign-language title is being cited.

And thanks for the blog link, Teresa: I had heard translators express that position before, but never really taken it seriously. Now I know of a semi-authoratative source (it's the blog, not the manual) actually arguing for paraphrasing all translations of quotations when using APA style. APA also translates article titles from Western European languages, which always seemed like an aberration to me, but I now know it is standard in some fields.

Otherwise, I agree with Nikki: I don't think the question can be answered in a productive way unless it is linked with a specific style guide or citation style. For example, the APA blog wants the translation formatted as a paraphrase and not a direct quotation, which is the exact opposite of what the Chicago FAQs state and what has always seemed to me to be standard practice in texts from my fields (humanities: literature, history, art history).

Most English-language journals and academic publishers have a section on their website called "instructions for authors" (or something similar), which will lead you to a style guide. If that option isn't available (often the case with bilingual publications published outside the English-speaking world), you can tell the author that he or she needs to ask the editor (or the agency to ask the author to ask the editor). If that option doesn't work, then you can look at 3 or 5 journals from the field and published in the relevant target-language country, see what they do, and then tell the author you are going to do that unless they explicitly tell you to do something else.


 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Academic papers: in-line citations of translated quotes

Advanced search







SDL MultiTerm 2017
Guarantee a unified, consistent and high-quality translation with terminology software by the industry leaders.

SDL MultiTerm 2017 allows translators to create one central location to store and manage multilingual terminology, and with SDL MultiTerm Extract 2017 you can automatically create term lists from your existing documentation to save time.

More info »
SDL Trados Studio 2017 only €435 / $519
Get the cheapest prices for SDL Trados Studio 2017 on ProZ.com

Join this translator’s group buy brought to you by ProZ.com and buy SDL Trados Studio 2017 Freelance for only €435 / $519 / £345 / ¥63000 You will also receive FREE access to Studio 2019 when released.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search