Does anyone use "Dutton Speedwords" or anything equivalent?
Thread poster: Daniel Frisano

Daniel Frisano
Monaco
Local time: 14:10
Member (2008)
English to Italian
+ ...
Jun 7

Does anyone use Dutton Speedwords or anything equivalent for professional purposes?

[Subject edited by staff or moderator 2018-06-07 20:15 GMT]


 

Dan Lucas  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:10
Member (2014)
Japanese to English
Alphabetic shorthands Jun 7

Daniel Frisano wrote:
Does anyone use Dutton Speedwords or anything equivalent for professional purposes?

No, until I read this post, I had never heard of Dutton speed words. It looks like an interesting and very complete system, but quite intense/extreme. I imagine you would have to to really commit to it for it to work well. I'm struggling to see a reason for using this in an age where a good typist can hit 100 words per minute quite easily?

Still, on a related note, before I started using voice recognition, I used a simple system of several hundred abbreviations to reduce the amount by which my fingers moved every day. I achieved this using PhraseExpress, a powerful piece of software for text expansion.

My system, such as it was, consisted of defaulting to using the first three letters of the word and the final letter of the word for the abbreviation. So, "passenger" becomes the abbreviation "pasr". When you type "pasr" it is immediately replaced by "passenger". In the same way, "tomw" is expanded to "tomorrow" and so on.

Sometimes it is better to ignore this rule. For example, I use "pn" as an abbreviation for "part number" but only in a specific software application, because it appears frequently in the documents I translate for a certain client, but very seldom in work for other clients.

The "first 3 + final 1" system is useful because the likelihood of you forgetting that you have an abbreviation for a word grows along with the number of abbreviations defined. The "first 3 + final 1" gives you a good place to start guessing.

However, it is not perfect. Some words just do not reduce well using this rule, because there are multiple potential candidates. Consider the cases of "comprehension", "companion" and "comparison" - they all reduce to "comn" under this scheme, which is terminally ambiguous.

Nevertheless, I found the system pretty useful and I still use the basic approach for boilerplate text. For example I have "tyfctmwtp" for "thank you for coming to me with this proposal" and "tyftc" for "thank you for that clarification" and so on.

As I type, PhraseExpress puts up a menu showing all the possible expansions. After typing "tyf" there are about a dozen potential expansions, all based around variations on "thank you for".

So, if all you are trying to do is speed up your text entry by using abbreviations and shorthand, a text expander may be an interesting thing to research. I find PhraseExpress very useful on a day-to-day basis, and one thing which I don't think any other expander offers is the ability to limit expansion to a certain application (as mentioned above).

But maybe you had something different in mind?

Regards,
Dan


 

Daniel Frisano
Monaco
Local time: 14:10
Member (2008)
English to Italian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
@Dan Jun 7

I discovered Dutton by accident myself while playing around with Tatoeba, and it immediately struck a chord, since I use a similar system of abbreviations (and, yes, it is intense).

I'd like to know if anyone uses the same principle, out of sheer curiosity and also to get useful insights.

And I did get one, since I did not know Phrase Express.



Dan Lucas wrote:

I'm struggling to see a reason for using this in an age where a good typist can hit 100 words per minute quite easily?


Hitting 250! (Or rather multiply by 2-2.5 your usual output, i.e. reduce time spent typing to 40% or 50%)


 

Arjan van den Berg  Identity Verified
Local time: 15:10
Member (2010)
English to Dutch
+ ...
@Dan Jun 8

For one client, a client that really wants boilerplate translations and strict adherence to a extended glossary, I use AutoHotkey scripts. Sometimes it is based on the source word, for example 'twin' gives me 'tweepersoonskamer met 2 aparte bedden', sometimes I use abbreviations of the target term. I even use it for words with a diaeresis, for example 'patiënt', I just write 'patient' and the script changes it automatically into correct Dutch: 'patiënt'. In this way I don't have to bother with alt-number combination on my number block.

 

Dan Lucas  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:10
Member (2014)
Japanese to English
Me too Jun 8

Arjan van den Berg wrote:
I even use it for words with a diaeresis, for example 'patiënt', I just write 'patient' and the script changes it automatically into correct Dutch: 'patiënt'. In this way I don't have to bother with alt-number combination on my number block.

Exactly so, Arjan, these are the kind of uses to which I put PhraseExpress. I do use AHK, and have many scripts, but PhraseExpress provides a more user-friendly interface. Both tools save me a lot of key presses and mouse clicks.

Dan


 

Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 14:10
Member (2003)
Danish to English
+ ...
Autosuggest and Multiterm in Trados Jun 8

I cannot remember a system like that while I am concentrating on translating.

I am a fairly hopeless typist, and make errors, so the chances are that Dutton Speedwords would reproduce what I TYPED, and not always what I intended! After many years of practising and trying, my typing is not going to improve, but there are other options.

I use AutoSuggest and Multiterm with Trados. I can insert strings - currently the General Data Protection Regulation, which Trados inserts for me if I type Ge + Enter, and a whole lot of other things like that. I have numerous Danish Acts on this and that, names of authorities and public bodies, and quite a lot of words I regularly mistype.

If terms or names are only likely to occur in a single project, I can insert them as Autotext, and again, they appear when I type the first letters.

In Word I use AutoCorrect occasionally. The artist Vivianna Torun Bülow-Hübe was the first time I did that - with the umlauts and all, I simply could not type her name correctly, and I had to translate a long article about her design... However, vtbh in Autocorrect, no capitals, worked like a charm! No need to check the spelling when proofreading, either.

I think tricks like that are more intuitive and adaptable to individuals and different languages.

Maybe I should look into PhraseExpress - it sounds as if it works on similar principles.

[Edited at 2018-06-08 11:21 GMT]


 

Dan Lucas  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:10
Member (2014)
Japanese to English
Indeed it is Jun 8

Christine Andersen wrote:
Maybe I should look into PhraseExpress - it sounds as if it works on similar principles.

Indeed it does Christine.

So you could have an abbreviation that inserts "Vivianna Torun Bülow-Hübe" when you type "vivia", but it is important to note that, by default, PhraseExpress would perform this expansion in any Windows application, not only in Trados. With PhraseExpress you can however specify that the abbreviation be expanded only in certain applications. I actually use PhraseExpress mostly for non-translation typing, such as email.

Another approach would be to type something like "artlist" and have the software pop-up a list on screen from which you could select the name of an artist (or press a key from 0-9) to insert it into the text.

Dan

[Edited at 2018-06-09 11:36 GMT]


 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Does anyone use "Dutton Speedwords" or anything equivalent?

Advanced search







PerfectIt consistency checker
Faster Checking, Greater Accuracy

PerfectIt helps deliver error-free documents. It improves consistency, ensures quality and helps to enforce style guides. It’s a powerful tool for pro users, and comes with the assurance of a 30-day money back guarantee.

More info »
SDL MultiTerm 2017
Guarantee a unified, consistent and high-quality translation with terminology software by the industry leaders.

SDL MultiTerm 2017 allows translators to create one central location to store and manage multilingual terminology, and with SDL MultiTerm Extract 2017 you can automatically create term lists from your existing documentation to save time.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search