ATA Translations accepted at Courts of England and Wales?
Thread poster: Annie Sapucaia

Annie Sapucaia  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 14:22
Member (2011)
French to English
+ ...
Feb 24, 2020

Hi all,

I was asked a question by a potential client the other day that left me stumped. Are translations done by an ATA-certified translator accepted in UK Courts? Does anyone know if there are such rules? Have any ATA-certified members here had their translations used in UK courts?

Thanks in advance!


 

Teresa Borges
Portugal
Local time: 19:22
Member (2007)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
@Annie Feb 25, 2020

As far as I know, there are no “official translators” or “sworn translators” in the UK. Get in touch with the UK Embassy or the British Consulate.

[Edited at 2020-02-25 10:17 GMT]


philgoddard
Chris S
 

Tina Vonhof
Canada
Local time: 12:22
Member (2006)
Dutch to English
+ ...
Safe Feb 26, 2020

Just to play it safe, I have always suggested a few translators in the UK or NL in my case.

 

neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 20:22
Spanish to English
+ ...
Why wouldn't they be? Feb 26, 2020

As long as the translation is professionally done and faithful to the original, I don't think there will be any discrimination against ATA certified translations in the UK, but then again, you never know.
AFAIK, whereas other countries, for example Spain, ask for a sworn or certified translation, the UK does not have a system of 'sworn' or 'certified' translators accredited by a particular body, so it is usually enough for the translators to certify their own documents. Of course, a crede
... See more
As long as the translation is professionally done and faithful to the original, I don't think there will be any discrimination against ATA certified translations in the UK, but then again, you never know.
AFAIK, whereas other countries, for example Spain, ask for a sworn or certified translation, the UK does not have a system of 'sworn' or 'certified' translators accredited by a particular body, so it is usually enough for the translators to certify their own documents. Of course, a credential from an acknowledged official or quasi-official organisation like CIOL or ATA will always lend a bit of weight.
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Chris S
 

Annie Sapucaia  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 14:22
Member (2011)
French to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks Feb 27, 2020

Thank you all for your replies. I imagine that, if there is no official source saying translations *must* be done by a member of ITI, for example, that an ATA-certified translator would probably be fine. Maybe it's just not very common.

 

philgoddard
United States
Member (2009)
German to English
+ ...
Funnily enough, Feb 28, 2020

I'm in the US, and I had a UK customer today asking if I was a certified translator. I said that as far as I knew there was no such thing in either country, but I could certify the translation. In my long experience, the UK courts will almost always accept any piece of paper saying who you are and confirming that it's a true translation.

[Edited at 2020-02-28 19:43 GMT]


Chris S
 

Annie Sapucaia  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 14:22
Member (2011)
French to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Helpful Mar 2, 2020

philgoddard wrote:

I'm in the US, and I had a UK customer today asking if I was a certified translator. I said that as far as I knew there was no such thing in either country, but I could certify the translation. In my long experience, the UK courts will almost always accept any piece of paper saying who you are and confirming that it's a true translation.

[Edited at 2020-02-28 19:43 GMT]


Thanks Phil, that's helpful!


 

Edward Potter  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 20:22
Member (2003)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Yes Mar 2, 2020

Agreement with Neilmac.

AFAIK no official certification is required in the UK court system. This is also true in the U.S. A credential here or there might be nice as you sign your translation, but I think it is rare when a judge actually requires seeing such credentials.

My colleagues might like to confirm and/or add to the following short list:

Countries with an official certification: Canada, Germany, Spain, Australia
Countries that do not have an o
... See more
Agreement with Neilmac.

AFAIK no official certification is required in the UK court system. This is also true in the U.S. A credential here or there might be nice as you sign your translation, but I think it is rare when a judge actually requires seeing such credentials.

My colleagues might like to confirm and/or add to the following short list:

Countries with an official certification: Canada, Germany, Spain, Australia
Countries that do not have an official certification: UK, US, Ireland

Come on, colleagues, help me with my list.
Collapse


 

Annie Sapucaia  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 14:22
Member (2011)
French to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
not Canada Mar 4, 2020

Edward Potter wrote:

Agreement with Neilmac.

AFAIK no official certification is required in the UK court system. This is also true in the U.S. A credential here or there might be nice as you sign your translation, but I think it is rare when a judge actually requires seeing such credentials.

My colleagues might like to confirm and/or add to the following short list:

Countries with an official certification: Canada, Germany, Spain, Australia
Countries that do not have an official certification: UK, US, Ireland

Come on, colleagues, help me with my list.


Thanks, Edward. There's actually no official certification in Canada, either - we have provincial bodies (OTTIAQ, ATIO) but we don't have sworn translators or even a national association.


 

Edward Potter  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 20:22
Member (2003)
Spanish to English
+ ...
How does it work in Canada? Mar 15, 2020

Annie Sapucaia wrote:
There's actually no official certification in Canada, either - we have provincial bodies (OTTIAQ, ATIO) but we don't have sworn translators or even a national association.


That is interesting. Do those provinces require certification from those provincial bodies for sworn translations, or is the certification only recommended?


 


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