Process of editing. How do you edit translations?
Thread poster: Denis Zavyalov

Denis Zavyalov  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 12:32
English to Russian
+ ...
Jul 7, 2005

How do you edit? When you get to edit a hard copy of an awful translation (spiced up with mistakes of all sorts so much that you start laughing) do you sit down in front of your computer and start retyping it the way you think it should be? Or do you use textual and marginal proof-correction marks used in publishing? Do you ever use those marks?

It would be good to know how people address the whole process of editing. Otherwise, I am starting to feel alienated in the way I approach editing.


 

Rosa Maria Duenas Rios (X)  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:32
Difficult situation Jul 7, 2005

It is always very tricky to accept an editing job before actually having seen the document. I have been caught several times and had to stick to a previously agreed price, when in fact the work was worth much more than I originally quoted.

Now, I state my per word editing rate and my hourly editing rate, and do not provide a final quote until I have seen the document. When I receive a hard copy and the corrections are too many to be clear enough on paper, I contact the client to inform him/her of the situation and point out that since I will have to retype the full document (sometimes it is possible to scan it and thus save a few hours), I will apply an hourly rate instead of a per word rate. If the client agrees, we are both happy, and I deliver a Word file with corrections. If the client does not agree, I decline the job. Of course all this is done with tact and diplomacy, not to alienate the client too much. They always hate to find out that they have a horrible translation in their hands.

[Edited at 2005-07-08 03:35]


 

Denis Zavyalov  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 12:32
English to Russian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Proof-correction marks? Jul 8, 2005

Thanks for your comments. It is useful to know how to deal with the client.

Do you use the proof-correction marks at all? Is using them a standard in the industry?


 

Rosa Maria Duenas Rios (X)  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:32
Yes, yes Jul 8, 2005

zavdenis wrote:

Thanks for your comments. It is useful to know how to deal with the client.

Do you use the proof-correction marks at all? Is using them a standard in the industry?



To both questions. Otherwise, it would be difficult for others to understand what the correctors are "saying".

[Edited at 2005-07-08 03:35]


 

Chiara_M  Identity Verified
Local time: 18:32
French to Italian
+ ...
Depending on what you mean by editing and proof-reading Jul 8, 2005

I usually use proof-correction marks when working in the publishing field. An agency is not obliged to know that code. Besides, those marks are useful only if "shared" and for a proof-reading job. I mean, if you simply have to delete or replace a character, or adding a space and so on, it's pretty good to use proof-correction marks. But if you have to edit a text (editing is much more "invasive" than proof-reading in my opinion and always talking about publishing standards), I think it's not the case. First of all, becase when an editing is asked, usually a proof-reading follows.
Chiara


 

Denis Zavyalov  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 12:32
English to Russian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
What about machine translations? Jul 11, 2005

I have downloaded samples of UN examination materials for editors and the first part of the test is editing a machine translation (the amount of mistakes and stylistic inappropriacies makes me laugh, too). Mind you, everything is supposed to be done by hand and on the copy. I guess, it is more of a proof-reading job, but the prompt states "Text to be edited". And if this editing job must be done with proof-correction marks, then there will simply be no space available on the copy. I am left to wonder...

 

Rosa Maria Duenas Rios (X)  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:32
Tests and real life... Jul 11, 2005

zavdenis wrote:
I have downloaded samples of UN examination materials for editors and the first part of the test is editing a machine translation (the amount of mistakes and stylistic inappropriacies makes me laugh, too). Mind you, everything is supposed to be done by hand and on the copy. I guess, it is more of a proof-reading job, but the prompt states "Text to be edited". And if this editing job must be done with proof-correction marks, then there will simply be no space available on the copy. I am left to wonder...


As you indicate, the UN material is a test, and I assume the main intent is to measure proficiency in the use of correction marks, and probably the ability to insert multiple corrections in a restricted space. As a test, I can understand it.

However, in real life, I would refuse a job to edit or proofread a machine translation, as I consider it easier and faster to translate the whole thing.


 

Denis Zavyalov  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 12:32
English to Russian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
That's what I think is most practical in this situation Jul 13, 2005

As far as editing is concerned you may want to use the machine translation and 'bring it into line with the original', but it will take lots of time. If the money is good, why not?

UN may want to test proficiency in using the marks, but do they have to go to extremes? Literally the whole text is 'robotic' and I would use one mark most of the time: 'substitute with reference to extra material' and then provide proofread paragraphs on a separate page. It is a tough test.


 


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Process of editing. How do you edit translations?

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