Do you translate "SARL", "GmbH", etc. to the equivalent in your language?
Thread poster: Maricica W.
Maricica W.  Identity Verified

English to Romanian
+ ...
Jul 20, 2005

I have proofread a translation and noticed that "Ltd." was translated to Romanian. I usually keep these abbreviations untranslated, in order to show the company's nationality.
What do you think is best? Thank you.

Regards,
Veronica


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Giovanna Graziani  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 01:55
Member (2002)
German to Italian
+ ...
do not translate them Jul 20, 2005

Not only because they show the company's nationality, but most of all because these abbreviations are part of the official company registered name.

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Özden Arıkan  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 01:55
Member
English to Turkish
I don't Jul 20, 2005

because they are considered part of a company's name, which should be treated as a proper name. Also, not all such abbreviations would have an exact equivalent in another country's commercial law system.

HTH


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Philippe Etienne  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 01:55
Member
English to French
I don't either Jul 20, 2005

because of all the very valid reasons stated above.

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Rahi Moosavi  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 19:55
Member (2004)
Farsi (Persian) to English
+ ...
I never translate those parts Jul 20, 2005

I never translate those parts of corporate names and never translate the main names either, I just transliterate them and bring the original name in source language afterwards in brackets.

[Edited at 2005-07-20 10:03]


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cuervito
Local time: 00:55
English to Spanish
+ ...
Never translate this! Jul 20, 2005

The equivalents in other languages are not really equivalent because the liability can be very different. The minimum liability of a GmbH is about EUR 25.000 and of a Ltd in England GBP 1.

Regards


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Magda Dziadosz  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 01:55
Member (2004)
English to Polish
+ ...
Nope. Jul 20, 2005

I don't translate such abbreviations as they are important part of the comany's name.
Just for the record

Magda


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Maricica W.  Identity Verified

English to Romanian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you all Jul 20, 2005

You have a very good point here, Xola:
Xola wrote:

Also, not all such abbreviations would have an exact equivalent in another country's commercial law system.


This applies to my document as well - the Romanian legal system is a civil law system, like most continental European systems, and equivalences to the common law systems are difficult to establish and are usually approximations rather than perfect equivalents.

Thank you all for your replies - I have not translated this part either so far and was quite surprised when I found it translated.

Kind regards,
Veronica


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Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 01:55
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
+ ...
Yes if local, no if foreign Jul 20, 2005

Veronica Durbaca wrote:
I have proofread a translation and noticed that "Ltd." was translated to Romanian. I usually keep these abbreviations untranslated, in order to show the company's nationality.


Coming from a bilingual country, I translate them if the company is a local company. But if it's a foreign company, I don't translate it even if a similar extension exists in my own country, for the simple reason that a "Ltd" company in any other country is not guided by the same laws or principles as a "Ltd" company in my own country, and it can therefore not be regarded as the same type of thing.

What would be interesting for me, would be not a list of such abbreviations for various languages, but a list with explanations of the abbrevations for various countries. For example, if a company from the USA has "Inc" next to it's name, what does it mean? I'm sure it won't mean the same thing as for when a South African company or partnership has "Inc" next to its name, for example.


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Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 17:55
English to Spanish
+ ...
No, but... Jul 20, 2005

Such items should be retained as they are a part of the official company name, but a translator's note may be used as clarification with a translation of the term. Then everyone is happy.

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Rolf Kern  Identity Verified
Switzerland
Local time: 01:55
English to German
+ ...
No, but... Jul 21, 2005

This is part of the company name, but there are companies that have registered their name in various languages, so actually we translators should investigate the official company registers, but this is going a little far, so a note may also do.

Rolf


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Do you translate "SARL", "GmbH", etc. to the equivalent in your language?

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