Keeping jobs on the computer.
Thread poster: Lars Jelking

Lars Jelking  Identity Verified
Israel
Local time: 10:43
Member (2006)
English to Swedish
+ ...
Dec 29, 2005

During the years as translator a lot of text has gone into the computer. There is first all the correspondence with the outsourcers. Then come the source-files. And to top it up the target-files, invoices, reminders etc. I have been doing this now for 6+ years and accumulated more than 40 GB.

What's your opinion on how long to retain the materiel? Or must I invest in another hard-drive?

Season Greetings to you all.


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Sol  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 03:43
Spanish to English
+ ...
keep the backups Dec 29, 2005

Lars Jelking wrote:
I have been doing this now for 6+ years and accumulated more than 40 GB.


I hope you keep it somewhere else too, in case your computer crashes. I used to keep mine in floppies, then changed to a zip drive, and now that my computer burns cds, I save all my jobs to them. I keep a disk for each of my major clients an one for all the small miscellaneous jobs.


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Maria Diaconu  Identity Verified
Romania
Local time: 10:43
English to Romanian
DVD Dec 29, 2005

I would suggest that you keep it on DVDs. This is what I do. All the documents I have collected during one year of work fill up 1 DVD (4.7 gigabytes storage capacity).
HTH


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Heinrich Pesch  Identity Verified
Finland
Local time: 10:43
Member (2003)
Finnish to German
+ ...
Don't keep them all on the harddisk Dec 29, 2005

It's nice to have them all at hand with Google search etc. but every time your software scans for viruses it has to go through all that stuff. I noticed I need rather seldom work from two years ago. And they are on shelf for the case I need them once in a while.
(After all they remain in your TMs!)
regards
Heinrich


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Uldis Liepkalns  Identity Verified
Latvia
Local time: 10:43
Member (2003)
English to Latvian
+ ...
I use two external hard disks Dec 29, 2005

(internal ones are of no help, as I found out myself- last time my FAT went, it went simultaneously on both internal HDs- (thank you, Bill).

So now I use 2 external HDs, with one (80 Gb iOmega) came automatic backup software, the second one is 60 Gb portable computer disk in a special enclosure (fits into my shirt pocket, I carry it with me when I go to my country place). It surely is more convenient than CD or DVD and cost me about EUR 100. (Should be cheaper now).

I have set up iOmega automatic backup to back up all changed files every three hours (you can change that from instantly to whatever), but as I found out it is handy to have the old version of the file available after I have mistakenly saved it on my computer data disk after changes without renaming it.

Uldis


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xxxBrandis
Local time: 09:43
English to German
+ ...
blue ray DVD solution Dec 30, 2005

Hi! these are newer on the market and have about 27 GB capacity, so for a long term archiving very ideal. I use additionally one 200 GB external HD for my TMs as I need them regularly. This blue ray 27 GB is a sony product and they plan to bring out re-writable ones as well. Philips is declaring a 55 - 58 GB DVD, but that might take tim. Best Brandis

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Maria Diaconu  Identity Verified
Romania
Local time: 10:43
English to Romanian
Huge DVDs Dec 30, 2005

Brandis wrote:

Hi! these are newer on the market and have about 27 GB capacity, so for a long term archiving very ideal. I use additionally one 200 GB external HD for my TMs as I need them regularly. This blue ray 27 GB is a sony product and they plan to bring out re-writable ones as well. Philips is declaring a 55 - 58 GB DVD, but that might take tim. Best Brandis


Thank you very much for the information, I wasn't aware of the existence of such "huge" DVDs


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Oliver Walter  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:43
Member (2005)
German to English
+ ...
Consider using WinZip Dec 30, 2005

(If you already use WinZip, you don't need to read this)
I agree with the others in keeping archive copies on physically separate disks. I suggest that these archives should be compressed, for which the most common tool is Winzip.
The advantages of using this are

1. It saves space. PDF files don't compress by much, but the compressed versions of other formats (including MS Word) will typically save 30% of the original size and 80% in some cases.

2. In the window showing the list of files in an archive you see all the files (could be one or thousands), and you can sort the list according to the folder name (assuming you ticked the "save fulll path info" box when you created the archive) or the filename, date, size or compression ratio.

http://www.winzip.com/prodpagewz.htm
I have no financial interest in WinZip. I paid for a licence a few weeks ago after having used it unlicensed for about 3 years. If you don't license, you get a reminder every time you start Winzip - that's the only difference (apart from the satisfaction of having paid for something that, in my experience, is useful and reliable).
Oliver


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Klas Törnquist
Local time: 09:43
English to Swedish
+ ...
Keep the most valuable stuff Dec 30, 2005

Lars Jelking wrote:

During the years as translator a lot of text has gone into the computer. There is first all the correspondence with the outsourcers. Then come the source-files. And to top it up the target-files, invoices, reminders etc. I have been doing this now for 6+ years and accumulated more than 40 GB.

What's your opinion on how long to retain the materiel? Or must I invest in another hard-drive?


If you are using a translation memory (TM) tool, your memory and term databases, IMO, are the most valuable stuff on your computer.
Never delete them!

If you are not using TM, the source files, and the target files you have translated are the most valuable stuff.

As for admin files, there's no need to keep them for more than a couple of years, I think.

Also note that hard drive space is cheap these days. Even external hard drives are cheap.

Klas


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Erik Hansson  Identity Verified
Germany
Member (2002)
Swedish
+ ...
External hard disk & archive software Jan 1, 2006

In addition to many of the good points already given here, I agree with Uldis about using external hard disks. There's another advantage with this "physical separation" from your computer: if you're going on holiday you can always put the external hard disks into your safe or another place where they are protected against theft, fire etc.

I use two external HDs combined with the Norton Ghost which makes images of the hard disks in the computer (similar to iOmega which Uldis described). You can set up the backup process just as you like (e.g. every day Monday till Friday at 3 pm you want HD C: to be copied). Very comfortable.

Kind regards and all the best for 2006
Erik

**********************************
Erik Hansson ( SFÖ )
Technical translator DE-SV
Hansson Übersetzungen GmbH
Am Birkenwäldchen 38
D-01900 Bretnig-Hauswalde, Germany
Phone +49 - 3 59 52 - 321 07
Fax +49 - 3 59 52 - 322 02
E-Mail info@hansson.de
Internet www.hansson.de
Internet www.technical-translators.net
Internet www.wintitus.de
ProZ profile http://www.proz.com/pro/21654
***********************************


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Vito Smolej
Germany
Local time: 09:43
Member (2004)
English to Slovenian
+ ...
get yourself a USB or Firewire HD Jan 6, 2006

What's your opinion on how long to retain the materiel? Or must I invest in another hard-drive?


My 140GB cost me about 100€, so it's doable. And of course burning contents now and then to CDROM and/or DVD is self-evident. CDROMs make more sense, because you have to brun more often - imagine losing three years on one DVD or 3 months on a CDROM.

For keeping track of it all (200+ diffferent CDROMs, copies of old ZIPs etc) I am using Advanced Disk Catalog since years (www.elcomsoft.com/adc.html). There's others for sure- the idea being, finding without much hassle on which of all those CDROMs you need to look for that darn file called *something*.doc

Regards

smo


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Alexandre Berger
French to English
+ ...
dust it off Jan 25, 2006

Lars Jelking wrote:

During the years as translator a lot of text has gone into the computer. There is first all the correspondence with the outsourcers. Then come the source-files. And to top it up the target-files, invoices, reminders etc. I have been doing this now for 6+ years and accumulated more than 40 GB.

What's your opinion on how long to retain the materiel? Or must I invest in another hard-drive?

Season Greetings to you all.


Well, I'm not going to go into the details of "where" you should keep your stuff, I think this aspect of your question has been answered with detail if you add up all the previous quotes.

I'm just going to underlign the importance of "keeping all your records", they represent your work, I would make diferent compartments,

1-source/target, they are invaluable proof of your ability to perform your job and show your progress.
2-the invoices are proof that you did translate professionaly and not on your own.
3-all previous employers that you have worked with should have a space with data on how to reach them and notes.

I might forget some details but I trust that once you have started to go through all of it you will find ways to organize yourself that might be even better than the ones i suggest.

Finaly, i wish to point out that this is a great way of evaluating yourself in your carrer, and it will help you with the decisions that you have to make.

It's only a one time job, that you will just need to update later from time to time.

And with that I wish you success

Alexandre Berger


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snowind
China
Local time: 15:43
English to Chinese
+ ...
I also use online harddisk for backup. Mar 6, 2006

it's necessary to backup important files both source and target in at least 3 places.

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