Transliterating names: should I, or shouldn't I?
Thread poster: i8a4re
i8a4re
Local time: 19:16
German to English
Jun 13, 2006

Hi folks,

I'm translating a piece from German into English that briefly mentions a young lady from Russia whose name has been expressed in German as Tatjana Iwanow.

Something inside me tells me I should render this as Tatiana Ivanov, but I'm not sure.

Anyone have any opinions?

Cheers
T


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Attila Piróth  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 19:16
Member
English to Hungarian
+ ...
Tatiana Ivanov(a) Jun 13, 2006

Yes, English has its proper transcription of Russian names that is deifferent from the German one. So, you should use 'v's instead of 'w's.
And you should check the name, too. I am pretty sure it is Ivanova - as she is a woman. But check it out in the KudoZ section.
Best,
Attila


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Erik Hansson  Identity Verified
Germany
Member (2002)
Swedish
+ ...
Different systems for transliterating Russian Jun 13, 2006

Hello Treebo,

maybe this link will help you a little bit further?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transcription_of_Russian

Best regards
Erik

**********************************
Erik Hansson ( SFÖ )
Technical translator DE-SV
Hansson Übersetzungen GmbH
Am Birkenwäldchen 38
D-01900 Bretnig-Hauswalde, Germany
Phone +49 - 3 59 52 - 321 07
Fax +49 - 3 59 52 - 322 02
E-Mail info@hansson.de
Internet www.hansson.de
Internet www.technical-translators.net
Internet www.wintitus.de
ProZ profile http://www.proz.com/pro/21654
***********************************


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xxxsofiablu
Netherlands
Local time: 19:16
Thank you, Erik! Jun 13, 2006

Thank you very much, Erik, for this most helpful link.
I've just bookmarked it.
Attila is right; I would write: Tatjana Ivanova.
Have a nice day you all!
Sofiablu


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Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:16
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
Not Tatjana Jun 13, 2006

Tatjana is a transliteration for German and other languages in which the letter "j" is pronounced as the letter "y" is pronounced in English.
Transliterate it as Tatiana or Tatyana. (Ivanova is fine).


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Robin Salmon  Identity Verified
Australia
Local time: 03:16
German to English
+ ...
Please try to convert Australian sports commentators (daunting task) Jun 13, 2006

They always talk about "Tatty Anna Grigorieva", a pole-vaulter who is always immaculately turned-out.

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Austra Muizniece  Identity Verified
Latvia
Local time: 20:16
Member (2004)
English to Latvian
+ ...
Agree Jun 13, 2006

Jack Doughty wrote:

Tatjana is a transliteration for German and other languages in which the letter "j" is pronounced as the letter "y" is pronounced in English.
Transliterate it as Tatiana or Tatyana. (Ivanova is fine).


It would also be "Tatjana" in Latvian, as we also pronounce "j" as y (e.g. "you"). So in English, I assume, it would be Tatyana or Tatiana.


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Monika Coulson  Identity Verified
Local time: 11:16
Member (2001)
English to Albanian
+ ...
Transliterate it if Jun 13, 2006

it is a fictional material.

I would not transliterate it if it was a legal document. (However, from what you say above, it is not a legal doc.)

Monika

Jack Doughty wrote:

Tatjana is a transliteration for German and other languages in which the letter "j" is pronounced as the letter "y" is pronounced in English.
Transliterate it as Tatiana or Tatyana. (Ivanova is fine).


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Olga Dubeshka  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 13:16
Russian to English
+ ...
be careful Jun 14, 2006

Hi all,

And this is coming from a russian girl with a long history of my name being misspelled by anyone and everyone.

First off, according to my best knowledge, it should be
Tatiana Ivanova. This is the most common, accepted (and universal) way of spelling.

But here`s a trick : if this is being done for ANY document
or any important purpose, make sure her name in her passport (they spell it in RU and EN there) MATCHES the one you use. If you have no passport, use other official document . I cannot stress this enough. People who issue passports are NOT bright, nor do they care. They spell it sometimes wrong and sometimes very wrong . However,
discrepancy in the spelling of her name in her passport and in other documents can lead to numerous (bad) situations.

Yeah, it`s a jungle out their, in name-translation.


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i8a4re
Local time: 19:16
German to English
TOPIC STARTER
Transliteration: 12 points Jun 14, 2006

Thanks everyone. I should have explained the nature of the piece I'm translating beforehand. It's just for a company's employee magazine, and the said person is describing her working day. I'm going to go with Tatiana Ivanova, which is what will be most readily accepted by my target audience.

Thanks for your responses!


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