Linux - worth learning?
Thread poster: Williamson

Williamson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:24
Flemish to English
+ ...
Apr 25, 2003

To what extend are Linux and Open Office the new hype? Would it be useful to attend a Linux-course? Yes, it is free, but the time spent to go to the course, attend it and come back equals a version of Ms.Windows in the store?

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xxxMarc P  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:24
German to English
+ ...
Linux, a hype Apr 25, 2003

I don\'t think the hype is particularly new; it hit a peak, I would say, when the first major distribution with a GUI appeared, around 1999. At the moment, I would say Linux is steadily gaining ground, particularly in some markets (e.g. public administration) and some regions (e.g. sout-east Asia). But as a Linux advocate, I would say that, of course.



>Yes, it is free, but the time spent to go to the course<



I think the fact that it is free is a minor point. If you want to save money, just don\'t bother upgrading your existing Windows software. OOo is available for Windows anyway, so you don\'t need to switch to Linux to enjoy the benefits. Another Linux word processor with excellent compatibility to MS Word is Textmaker, which has only just been released. Cost: around 50 Euro. The Windows version has been around for several years, but for some reason, most people seem quite happy to pay several times as much for Word.



There is no point going on a course. You don\'t need to \"learn Linux\". The fact that you have a lot of control over the system from the command line is an added bonus, but it isn\'t necessary. You can do all your system administration through an intuitive GUI. If you know how to use your Windows or Mac GUI, you won\'t need a course to figure out GNOME or KDE. There will inevitably be some things you need to learn, but you can do that as you go along. If you get a virus (I\'m talking about Windows now, not Linux ) for example, you don\'t have to find out all about viruses just to get rid of it.



The applications, such as OOo, are something in their own right - you won\'t learn about those on a Linux course.



Marc


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Sonja Tomaskovic  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 12:24
English to German
+ ...
What do you need it for? Apr 25, 2003

Hi,



I started to work with Linux in 1999, and most of my knowledge about Linux came from installing it on my own computer and just simply trying.



I know, there may be some courses out there that \"teach\" you how to work with Linux.

Most courses out there are very specialized, and are made for advanced Linux users who need more knowledge in a special area (administration, firewalls, networking, etc.).



But honestly, what do you need it for?

Do you want to use it for yourself at home? If so, on a single workstation or as a server for your network?



If you just want to use OpenOffice, you don\'t have to have Linux installed on your computer. OpenOffice exists for Windows, as well.



If you are really interested in Linux as an alternative for windows, I would suggest you get one of the distributions that are easy to install (such as SuSe, Debian) and try it for your yourself. There are plenty of tutorials on the net leading you through the installation process or advising you about necessary preparations.



I think that no course can give you so much insight on Linux as trying it yourself.



Here are some Linux beginner tutorials/webpages:



http://www.ctssn.com/

http://www.linux.ie/newusers/beginners-linux-guide/

http://www.reallylinux.com/

http://beginnerslinux.org/



Regards,



Sonja


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Williamson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:24
Flemish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Potential professional purposes. Apr 25, 2003

For the past three years, I have been attending high-level, low-priced computer courses ( a rare thing on the market).

These course comprised hardware (to be able to repair and adapt a pc myself), (wireless) networks, peer-to-peer, Windows XP, MsOffice from starters to programming, Visual Basic and C. The school also offers Linux at the same high level. But together with the other courses, I will continue to follow it takes up 5 hours per day and this 3 times a week.

If I took/take all these computer courses, it is because I also would like to be able to offer freelance MsOffice teaching and freelance Programming. This will enable me to say \"no, thank you\" to low rates and have an alternative activity.

As to Linux, the school tries to present it as a \"new hype\", but I think that I will learn as much as I can from on-line sources. Save time. Thanks for the links.



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Rick Henry  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:24
Italian to English
+ ...
As with anything, specialize. Apr 27, 2003

If you\'re looking for extra income from Linux, I don\'t know that just taking a course or two for the OS will really help you. Much as in other careers, I think specialization is key. The Linux server setup market is pretty saturated (at least here in the US). You can, however, make a name for yourself if you specialize is sub-components of that market. Clusters, databases, Web apps, security, etc. If you\'re trying to get more programming experience, I wouldn\'t look to any particular platform, but rather to languages such as java.



R.

==



Quote:


On 2003-04-25 12:07, Williamson wrote:

For the past three years, I have been attending high-level, low-priced computer courses ( a rare thing on the market).

These course comprised hardware (to be able to repair and adapt a pc myself), (wireless) networks, peer-to-peer, Windows XP, MsOffice from starters to programming, Visual Basic and C. The school also offers Linux at the same high level. But together with the other courses, I will continue to follow it takes up 5 hours per day and this 3 times a week.

If I took/take all these computer courses, it is because I also would like to be able to offer freelance MsOffice teaching and freelance Programming. This will enable me to say \"no, thank you\" to low rates and have an alternative activity.

As to Linux, the school tries to present it as a \"new hype\", but I think that I will learn as much as I can from on-line sources. Save time. Thanks for the links.





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