Developing a specialization in Web 2.0 technologies, localization, internationalization, etc.
Thread poster: David Jessop

David Jessop  Identity Verified
Spain
Member
Spanish to English
+ ...
Jul 16, 2009

Hello Colleagues!

I am presently working on a translation/copywriting project for a social networking website. I´m really enjoying the creative nature of it, my dynamic client, and the project overall. For a long time a personal hobby/passion of mine has been emerging technologies, specifically integrated with the Internet. I´m pretty good with computers and understanding technological advances, although not a true techie, and have been impressed with and tried to take advantage of the interactive nature of the Internet. Because it fits so well with my hobbies and interests, I am therefore considering making the leap to specialize in Web 2.0 technologies, localization, internationalization, etc.

My question is this: What software and resources do you recommend I purchase, read, digest, learn, watch, play with, acquire or otherwise use to develop my knowledge in this area to make me the most useful to my clients and develop my expertise?

Any lists, tips, thoughts, considerations, suggestions etc. are welcome!

Best,
David


 

David Jessop  Identity Verified
Spain
Member
Spanish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
No responses? Jul 16, 2009

Hello...

This really surprises me that there have not been more responses given that people have so many thoughts here and I was under the impression this would generate lots of ideas. Is there another forum you think I should post this in, such as Getting Established?

Best,
David


 

Claudia Alvis  Identity Verified
Peru
Local time: 06:19
Member
Spanish
+ ...
Google Jul 17, 2009

I'm not shutting you off, but there are so many good localization resources out there, that Google is your best bet. Try the blogosphere and the localization groups in different network sites like Twitter or LinkedIn. ProZ also has a Localization forum. There's also Lisa Website or Multilingual Magazine that have plenty of information about the industry. You might want to get a certification or study it by yourself. I completed the Technical Certification Program from ACC and it was totally worth the money, but there's also the one from University of California in Chico, and plenty more. W3 also has a lot of free resources. You need to know certain things like the difference between translation, localization (110n), internationalization (i18n) and globalization; you need to know something about html, css, php or xml, rc if you go into web or software localization. I haven't had the time yet, but I'm gonna be writing in my blog about translating in localization projects.

As for tools, you do need to use a CAT tool, that is non-negotiable. And also use at least one QA tool. The reason I've become such a fan of Studio is because of how much it helps the localization processes thanks to its real-time QA. Let me give you an example. I recently translated a DS Nintendo game and the instructions were not to expand the target and even keep it shorter. Spanish is usually 30% longer than English so I set the QA tool to set off a warning if the translation was longer than 100% of the source. I was also given a two glossaries of terms and additional instructions, I was able to manage them all with Studio. Apparently they didn't find any terminology inconsistencies when they did their own QA (I know that they did find some in other languages), so the client was pleased and now I'm translating the same game in a different platform and almost 10 times larger. I used to perform the QA process at the very end, which took me ages. Being able to do it in real time is saving me a lot of time and the clients are happier because there are less things to correct, that means more jobs and money. There's a very useful thread about terminology consistency tools over at, the now infamous, LinkedIn.

The thing about translation in localization projects (software, websites, etc.) is that it's not just about translating. It's about being able to follow certain rules and processes. Localization agencies and departments usually send you the files to translate, and certain procedures you have to follow. You need to be aware of potential problems. Aware of the nuances of each term (delete, clear and remove do not mean the same thing) or the terminology that should be used or not (Windows Mobile phones use a different terminology than an Android phone, so do their softwares).

The theory is absolutely necessary but experience is where you really learn. Apply to localization companies and tell them that even though you don't have a lot of experience, but you're willing to learn. Read, read, don't stop reading, this industry changes every day. As I said, in localization, you need to be able to follow instructions and procedures. Just like you I find the whole localization process extremely enjoyable.

[Edited at 2009-07-17 00:22 GMT]

[Edited at 2009-07-17 19:07 GMT]


 


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