EU-acronyms
Thread poster: Tradjur
Tradjur  Identity Verified
Local time: 19:04
German to Spanish
+ ...
Sep 15, 2011

Hi,
Germans often use (only) acronyms when referring to EU-conventions, regulations etc. in their written documents. It ist easy to find out which regulation or convention is meant, but what about the Spanish acronyms? Do you know where I can find them? Do you think they are used often in Spain as well?
Thank you so much in advance


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Hazel Underwood  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:04
Member (2005)
German to English
+ ...
EU Directorate Translation Sep 15, 2011

Have you looked on the EU DG Translation website?

http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/translation/index_en.htm

There's a stack of resources (link towards the bottom of the page) in all languages on translating for the EU.

You might find something there.


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FarkasAndras
Local time: 20:04
English to Hungarian
+ ...
Eur-lex Sep 15, 2011

Apart from the DGT-TM, which not many people have the technical skills to use, you can just use google.
The EU puts an absolutely staggering amount of documentation online, usually in many or all official languages.
If the term you're looking for is a formal legal term, google:
site:eur-lex.europa.eu TERM

If it's related to the European Parliament, google:
site:europarl.europa.eu TERM

If it's an informal or unusual term and you want a broad search:
site:europa.eu TERM

Then open the first promising hit and switch languages.

There are many EU glossaries as well - the links are all over this forum.

[Edited at 2011-09-15 16:33 GMT]


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neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 20:04
Spanish to English
+ ...
Not my job mate Sep 15, 2011

Perhaps this is not a great help, but I always stipulate to my clients in my collaboration conditions that the responsibility for undefined acronyms is theirs:

"6) No se puede garantizar las traducciones de abreviaciones y/o acrónimos que no hayan sido definidos en el texto original, excepto los más comunes."

They usually accept this after I give them a few examples of the rampant polysemy of acronyms...


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FarkasAndras
Local time: 20:04
English to Hungarian
+ ...
It's part of the job Sep 15, 2011

neilmac wrote:

Perhaps this is not a great help, but I always stipulate to my clients in my collaboration conditions that the responsibility for undefined acronyms is theirs:

"6) No se puede garantizar las traducciones de abreviaciones y/o acrónimos que no hayan sido definidos en el texto original, excepto los más comunes."

They usually accept this after I give them a few examples of the rampant polysemy of acronyms...


I take pride in being able to figure out all but the most obscenely unfathomable acronyms. I've had to ask clients about particularly obscure ones (or send a note with the translation), but rarely. Doing the research is not what I would call fun, but I see it as part of the job.


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Ty Kendall  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:04
Hebrew to English
An (unfortunate) part of the job, but a part nonetheless... Sep 16, 2011

Hebrew is quite sadistic in its sheer abundance of abbreviations/acronyms.
These abbreviations are usually always given without any explanation. The logic being that these documents are written by and for "people in the know" i.e. a legal document written for lawyers, a medical text written for doctors etc where the audience is expected to be familiar with the jargon and endless abbreviations associated with the field.

Even everyday, "neutral" colloquial language is littered with abbreviations though, military abbreviations are quite frequent (given that most Israelis serve in the army for military service and pick this language up and continue to use it long past their discharge).

It wouldn't really be possible for me to turn around and claim it's not my job.

It is often the most frustrating part of the job, but it can be quite rewarding and I agree with FarkasAndras about seeing the silver lining.

In addition it's personally beneficial to use it as a professional development opportunity to expand and consolidate your specialised vocabulary (and exercise your research skills - which is never a bad thing).

Without problems that test the limits of our abilities we can never expand them...IMO.


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Teresa Borges
Portugal
Local time: 19:04
Member (2007)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Another good source Sep 16, 2011

http://publications.europa.eu/code/de/de-5000400.htm

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