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I just got UNLIMITED STORAGE via Office 365/OneDrive!
Thread poster: Michael Joseph Wdowiak Beijer

Michael Joseph Wdowiak Beijer  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:19
Member (2009)
Dutch to English
+ ...
Jan 8, 2015

I just got unlimited OneDrive storage by virtue of my Office 365 account, which costs only £59.99 per year (or £5.99 per month), and includes licences for all the latest Office applications, both online, on my iPad/phone and desktop.

Pretty cool.

some_text

OneDrive isn't perfect yet, and there are a few things that Dropbox still does better, but it seems to be improving fast, and Microsoft has been putting a lot of work into how it will be integrated into the upcoming Windows 10.

Michael


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George Trail  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:19
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Really? Jan 8, 2015

Unlimited? How? Are you sure you haven't let someone hack into your computer by installing dodgy software made to look like it's from Microsoft?

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Michael Joseph Wdowiak Beijer  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:19
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Don't worry, it's legit. Jan 8, 2015

Hi George,

Head over to: https://preview.onedrive.com/?wt.mc_id=oo_blog_onedrive_insertblogtitlehere (to request it from MS) (which I found via http://phandroid.com/2014/10/27/microsoft-office-365-unlimited/ )

My storage space just went up 10 TB in my OneDrive interface:

some_text

See also:
http://www.informationweek.com/cloud/cloud-storage/microsoft-office-365-gets-unlimited-cloud-storage/d/d-id/1316977 +
http://www.windowscentral.com/unlimited-onedrive-storage-starts-rolling-out-office-365-subscribers +
http://www.techtimes.com/articles/18909/20141029/want-unlimited-cloud-storage-sign-up-for-a-microsoft-office-365-subscription.htm

Michael

[Edited at 2015-01-08 14:15 GMT]

[Edited at 2015-01-08 14:16 GMT]


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Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:19
Member (2008)
Italian to English
Well, I wouldn't pay that Jan 8, 2015

Michael Beijer wrote:

I just got unlimited OneDrive storage by virtue of my Office 365 account, which costs only £59.99 per year (or £5.99 per month), and includes licences for all the latest Office applications, both online, on my iPad/phone and desktop.

Pretty cool.


I wouldn't pay that. Plus, I'm willing to bet it will get more and more expensive as the years go by. If at any point, for any reason, you stop paying, you lose your stuff. Gone. Auf Wiedersehen. Arrivederci. Sayonara.

I'd rather pay nothing and keep everything on my hard drive, or on external drives. Most of the translation work I do is extremely confidential and I need to keep it under my exclusive control. We all know that the Cloud can be hacked.

And anyway, if I put everything in the Cloud, how will I access it when I can't get Internet access? Just let me be cool in my own way



[Edited at 2015-01-08 15:33 GMT]


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Phil Hand  Identity Verified
China
Local time: 21:19
Chinese to English
NDA issue? Jan 8, 2015

Hi, Michael. Do you know if Office online opens you up to any NDA issues? I don't see it as a safety risk, but some of my contracts definitely say that I can't transmit data to any third party. Wouldn't using an online word processing app be against the rules?

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Olly Pekelharing  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 14:19
Member (2009)
Dutch to English
NDA and email Jan 8, 2015

I sometimes hear it argued that docs attached to emails are just as likely to get hacked (on route I assume) as data in the cloud, but I see there are plenty of people in this forum who obviously don't believe this is the case. What's the truth? Isn't everybody's email stored for at least a time on their provider's server? Are email providers supposed to be more secure than cloud services?

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Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:19
Member (2008)
Italian to English
Deleted Jan 8, 2015

Olly Pekelharing wrote:

I sometimes hear it argued that docs attached to emails are just as likely to get hacked (on route I assume) as data in the cloud, but I see there are plenty of people in this forum who obviously don't believe this is the case. What's the truth? Isn't everybody's email stored for at least a time on their provider's server? Are email providers supposed to be more secure than cloud services?


I have set my provider's server to delete emails as soon as I delete them from my own hard drive. Which I do on a daily basis, saving the important ones as text files.

This is to avoid the "Monica Lewinsky Syndrome" (she thought she had deleted her emails to Bill Clinton but they were still on the server)




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Miguel Carmona  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:19
English to Spanish
... Jan 8, 2015

Tom in London wrote:

This is to avoid the "Monica Lewinsky Syndrome" (she thought she had deleted her emails to Bill Clinton but they were still on the server)


Silly me, I always thought the "Monica Lewinsky Syndrome" had something to do with cigars.


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Michael Joseph Wdowiak Beijer  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:19
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Luddite scaremongering vs The voice of modern reason Jan 8, 2015

Tom in London wrote:

Michael Beijer wrote:

I just got unlimited OneDrive storage by virtue of my Office 365 account, which costs only £59.99 per year (or £5.99 per month), and includes licences for all the latest Office applications, both online, on my iPad/phone and desktop.

Pretty cool.


I wouldn't pay that (1). Plus, I'm willing to bet it will get more and more expensive as the years go by (2). If at any point, for any reason, you stop paying, you lose your stuff. Gone. Auf Wiedersehen. Arrivederci. Sayonara (3).

I'd rather pay nothing and keep everything on my hard drive, or on external drives. Most of the translation work I do is extremely confidential and I need to keep it under my exclusive control. We all know that the Cloud can be hacked (4).

And anyway, if I put everything in the Cloud, how will I access it when I can't get Internet access? (5) Just let me be cool in my own way



[Edited at 2015-01-08 15:33 GMT]


Hi Tom,

(1) You wouldn't pay a measly £59.99 a year for unlimited online storage, licences to all the latest Office software (online, tablet, mobile and desktop versions!)? OK, fine. I would.

(2) Actually, these things tend to get cheaper over time, rather than more expensive. Just look at what happened and is happening between Dropbox, Google Drive, OneDrive, etc. Everyone's offering more and more space, for less and less moolah.

(3) If you stop paying, they don't just delete your data. I'm not sure about Microsoft (OneDrive), but I just cancelled my Dropbox subscription, and they told me I can keep it all up there as long as I want but just can't add anything. Not 100% sure how long, but it looks like they mean indefinitely. See e.g.: https://www.dropbox.com/en/help/333

You are much more likely to "lose all your stuff" due to a cock-up at home (disk failure, theft, fire, etc.), if you ask me.

(4) Do we? And who is "we"? That's just Luddite scaremongering. If you use email, at all, you are already screwed. You can delete as many of those emails as you want, the damage is already done. Emails are just as susceptible to hacking as online storage. If you want to be really secure, you'll have to start exchanging secret keys with your clients

(5) You will still be able to access it all because the online data is merely synced to the earthbound files on your Macintosh computer. Unless you choose to store some of it up there, and delete it from your computer.

Embrace the future, Tom, it will only be here once.

Michael


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Michael Joseph Wdowiak Beijer  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:19
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That's a good question. Jan 8, 2015

Phil Hand wrote:

Hi, Michael. Do you know if Office online opens you up to any NDA issues? I don't see it as a safety risk, but some of my contracts definitely say that I can't transmit data to any third party. Wouldn't using an online word processing app be against the rules?


Hi Phil,

That's a good question. It's probably about time someone did some solid research on that, and the question about the security (or lack thereof) of email and cloud services. I really have no idea. I just do my best to do everything as securely as possible, and get on with things. I'm not overly paranoid that people are out to steal the nonsense I usually translate on an average day. Very occasionally, a client will ask me to use their special protected FTP thingee because a client demands a higher level of security, which I of course agree to. However, nine times out of ten the PMs of the agency then mess something up and end up just emailing me the files anyway

I keep meaning to try out things like Boxcryptor, but never seem to get around to it (I might have a look now …).

"Encrypt your cloud with Boxcryptor
Boxcryptor protects your files in the cloud no matter if you use Dropbox, Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, SugarSync, Box.net, or any other major cloud storage provider. It also supports all the clouds that use the WebDAV standard such as Cubby, Strato HiDrive, and ownCloud." (from their website)

Michael


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Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:19
Member (2008)
Italian to English
Gone Jan 9, 2015

Michael Beijer wrote:

Embrace the future, Tom, it will only be here once.

Michael



I left the future behind a long time ago.


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Phil Hand  Identity Verified
China
Local time: 21:19
Chinese to English
Real security vs. legal security Jan 9, 2015

Olly & Michael - I completely agree with that, email is clearly the weak link in everyone's security chain. I don't really think that using Dropbox or G drive or this MS version increases the real risk of data loss. But I do worry about slightly increased legal liability. If the worst were to happen, and I got sued for loss of data, I figure I'm safe with email: you sent it to me via email, so I sent it back the same way. But I haven't got that same argument if I (a) stored their documents in my own cloud facility or (b) processed their documents on a cloud application.

In five years' time I expect this to be a non-issue.


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Alex Lago  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 14:19
Member (2009)
English to Spanish
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OneDrive License Jan 9, 2015

The OneDrive license literally reads as follows:

"When you transmit or upload Content to the Services, you're giving Microsoft the worldwide right, without charge, to use Content as necessary: to provide the Services to you, to protect you, and to improve Microsoft products and services."

This is so ambiguous that it basically gives them the right to do whatever they see fit with your content.


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Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:19
Member (2008)
Italian to English
Wow Jan 9, 2015

Alex Lago wrote:

The OneDrive license literally reads as follows:

"When you transmit or upload Content to the Services, you're giving Microsoft the worldwide right, without charge, to use Content as necessary: to provide the Services to you, to protect you, and to improve Microsoft products and services."

This is so ambiguous that it basically gives them the right to do whatever they see fit with your content.


Wow - that means they could take anything I put on the Cloud (for instance the translated text of a confidential contract) and do whatever they want with it!


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Michael Joseph Wdowiak Beijer  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:19
Member (2009)
Dutch to English
+ ...
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They aren't that dumb. Jan 9, 2015

Alex Lago wrote:

The OneDrive license literally reads as follows:

"When you transmit or upload Content to the Services, you're giving Microsoft the worldwide right, without charge, to use Content as necessary: to provide the Services to you, to protect you, and to improve Microsoft products and services."

This is so ambiguous that it basically gives them the right to do whatever they see fit with your content.


Yeah, these things sound kind of scary, but a little digging will reveal that all the big companies handling our data (Google/Gmail, Yahoo, Dropbox, Apple, etc.) have similar terms in their agreements with us. All it means is they can shuffle your stuff around to improve the service. They would never do anything that could result in a lawsuit. They aren't that dumb. They wouldn't have gotten where they are if they were.

Michael


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