Website about the modern English language
Thread poster: Charlotte Blank

Charlotte Blank  Identity Verified
Local time: 01:04
Czech to German
+ ...
Jul 18, 2006

Not so much a "ressource" for translators but an informative Australian website about the English language: http://abcasiapacific.com/englishbites/library.htm
with "Common expressions", irregular and phrasal verbs etc.

English is not my mother-tongue so I can't judge whether the language used and explained here is British or American or even Australian English!


 

Sherey Gould  Identity Verified
Local time: 17:04
German to English
definitely not US-Eng Jul 18, 2006

Can definitely state right off the bat it is NOT US-English... when the page first opened, I saw this gem:

cark it
Cark it is slang. It means to die.
Example: My goldfish carked it.

... and laughed out loud, so will now try to spread that up-to-now unknown gem around California!

Now back to the site to see what else I can discover - Thanks!


 

mediamatrix (X)
Local time: 21:04
Spanish to English
+ ...
What's more, it's wrong! Jul 18, 2006

http://www.infoplease.com/dictionary/cark

cark

Pronunciation: (kärk), [key] Archaic.

—n.
care or worry.

—v.t., v.i.
to worry.

Unless the goldfish was worried to death, of course...

MediaMatrix


 

annienr
English to Spanish
It's not 'wrong'. it's slang Jul 18, 2006

It's a commonly used slang term in the UK and Australia.
Used to refer to inanimate objects as well as living things, just as a battery can be 'dead'.
Can also be used as a warning - "don't fall off the ladder or you'll cark it"
Annie


 

Daniel García
English to Spanish
+ ...
Is it really wrong? Jul 19, 2006

mediamatrix wrote:

What's more, it's wrong!

http://www.infoplease.com/dictionary/cark

cark

Pronunciation: (kärk), [key] Archaic.

—n.
care or worry.

—v.t., v.i.
to worry.

Unless the goldfish was worried to death, of course...

MediaMatrix



Oh, dear... You have to be careful when choosing your reference material.

I don't think it's wrong, it seems to be perfectly correct slang Australian English.

→ verb
[no obj.] (Austral. informal) die: he's always bragged about carking it before he hit twenty.
- ORIGIN 1970s: probably imitative of the caw of a carrion crow.

The Oxford Dictionary of English (revised edition). Ed. Catherine Soanes and Angus Stevenson. Oxford University Press, 2005.

Daniel


 

Charlotte Blank  Identity Verified
Local time: 01:04
Czech to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Answer from ABC Asia Pacific :-) Jul 26, 2006

mediamatrix wrote:
—n.
care or worry.

—v.t., v.i.
to worry.

Unless the goldfish was worried to death, of course...



Hi,

I wrote to them about their website and here is what they answered:

Unfortunately the goldfish is dead not worried!

Best Regards
Nicola
ABC Asia Pacific


 


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Website about the modern English language

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