Buying a computer
Thread poster: krishna mallick

krishna mallick
India
Local time: 07:32
Japanese to English
+ ...
Aug 29, 2007

Hi friends,

I would be buying a desktop PC shortly. Could somebody tell me the latest configuration for best performance.
RAM, processor, capacity, screen size, etc. I am not aware what other things are needed.
I am a jpn>eng translator.

I would also like to make the computer usable to non-japanese speakers, who are my family people. How is it posible for them to shift to non-japanese operating mode?
Is it possible to select the required OS when the computer is made ON?


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Maria Karra  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 22:02
Member (2000)
Greek to English
+ ...
take a look at this thread Aug 29, 2007

Hi Krishna,
you may find some of the answers to your questions here
http://www.proz.com/topic/80210


As to making the computer usable to non-Japanese speakers: in order to do that I'm afraid you need to install two different operating systems. If for example you only install the Japanese version of Windows, all users will have to use that version. To switch before two operating systems you'd have to reboot. Here's some info about dual boot: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dual_boot
Maria


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Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 04:02
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
+ ...
Computer specs change all the time Aug 30, 2007

krishna mallick wrote:
Could somebody tell me the latest configuration for best performance?


Computer specifications change so often that any specific advice is likely to be outdated within two or three months.

Personally I'd go for an entry-level computer (that's the cheapest computer you can buy at a franchised or chained computer shop), and then upgrade certain components, such as RAM, hard drives, optical devices, etc.

Personally I find little performance difference between a 2.2 GHz and a 2.6 GHz processor, so I'd say don't be tempted to buy an expensive processor.

Get more RAM, get more USB ports. Get the techie to install at least 2 USB ports and the sound sockets at the front of the box. Get another hard drive, and get an external hard drive (or an external box for it).

Perhaps your preferred operating system requires additional video capabilities, so maybe it would be good to upgrade on that -- ask the sales person. If you want to use more than one screen at a time, you might need a better video card than entry-level.

Is it possible to select the required OS when the computer is made ON?


Yes. You need a bootloader. There is usually a default OS that runs after a few seconds, if you don't choose another one. Linux installations often have bootloaders bundled into their packages, but if both your OSes are MS Windows, you may have to get a third-party product -- but perhaps the sales person can install it for you, for a small fee.

It *must* be possible to link the OS locale to a certain user, sure, but don't ask me how.


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Petra_44  Identity Verified
Local time: 04:02
English to German
+ ...
How to run two operating systems Aug 30, 2007

Hello,

as someone already mentioned, you can run two different operating systems and reboot the PC when you want to switch from one to the other.

I also read about a solution to run two operating systems on one PC or server simultaneously. The company that built it is called VMware. I don't know what it costs, but you can take a look at it.

And how about installing an English user interface and simply switching from an English to a Japanese keyboard when needed? I don't know whether that solves your problem, but switching keyboards can be done by hotkey, such as Strg+4 for instance (you define the hotkey yourself), so you can do it very quickly.

Best wishes,

Petra


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Robert Tucker
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:02
German to English
+ ...
Discs, chips, operating system language Aug 30, 2007

My “new” computer is now nearly a year old. I am glad I got a faster hard-drive, 10000 rpm rather than 7500 rpm. The Dell computer the person on the the thread http://www.proz.com/topic/80210 was looking at in the end uses two 7500rpm discs in RAID 0, which If my memory serves me correctly means it would be accessing the same information on the two discs at the same time and so obtain the data correspondingly more quickly with the added safety of having your information stored twice over. This may be an option that needs considering.

On balance I’m glad I got a 2x2.12GHz Core 2 Duo processor rather than a 3.6GHz single processor – the times I’m most often not is when I’m doing a long search and replace on a text file when the system only uses one processor at a time. If you can afford a 2x3.6GHz Duo then , of course, you get the best of both worlds. The difference in the time it takes to compile a program from scratch (as Gentoo Linux users often do) between my “new” computer and my old one with a single 2GHz Celeron chip is staggering.

Note that in Linux you can switch between language interfaces without having to completely reboot. One user just has to log out, when the second can select a different language and log in – i.e. just the desktop needs to be shutdown and restarted, not the whole computer down to the bootloader.


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Vadim Poguliaev  Identity Verified
Russian Federation
Local time: 05:02
English to Russian
VMware Aug 30, 2007

Basic VMware solution is free, you can download it from their site.
Also some dual-core intel processors provide virtualization functionality, which offers hardware support for running two operation systems on one machine and allows to switch between them easily.

About configuration - if you don't plan to use your PC for DTP, grafic applications, 3D, gaming and other intensive workloads, cheap basic configuration will do, just make sure that it has at least 2 GB RAM


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Vadim Poguliaev  Identity Verified
Russian Federation
Local time: 05:02
English to Russian
No! Aug 30, 2007

Robert Tucker wrote:

RAID 0, which If my memory serves me correctly means it would be accessing the same information on the two discs at the same time and so obtain the data correspondingly more quickly with the added safety of having your information stored twice over.


You are wrong about added safety. In fact RAID 0 reduces safety, because when any of array disks fails, you loose all the data.


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Can Altinbay  Identity Verified
Local time: 22:02
Japanese to English
+ ...
Do you really need 2 OS versions? Aug 30, 2007

krishna mallick wrote:

Hi friends,

I would be buying a desktop PC shortly. Could somebody tell me the latest configuration for best performance.
RAM, processor, capacity, screen size, etc. I am not aware what other things are needed.
I am a jpn>eng translator.

I would also like to make the computer usable to non-japanese speakers, who are my family people. How is it posible for them to shift to non-japanese operating mode?
Is it possible to select the required OS when the computer is made ON?



I translate between those two languages and I don't have Japanese Windows installed. You can work just fine with an English OS. You do have to make one or two adjustments from the Control Panel regional settings.

There is one problem with this approach, but I have not found that it's worth paying for 2 versions of the OS. If you install Japanese software on an English Windows, you cannot read the menu or exception messages, because they are garbled (mojibake). This need not be the case, but it often is. Skype has figured it out and I have my language set to Japanese, and it displays everything fine.


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Daina Jauntirans  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:02
German to English
+ ...
Get a laptop? Aug 30, 2007

Honestly, I would skip the desktop and just get a laptop. That's what I plan on doing when my desktop is outdated. Laptops have the full functionality of desktops now, and you can find good prices, too. A laptop gives you much more flexibility in terms of where you can work.

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Owen Davies
Japan
Local time: 11:02
Member (2007)
Japanese to English
+ ...
Japanese keyboard Aug 31, 2007

Hi Krishna,
I agree with Can on this. Just get an English OS and install language support for Japanese, but one thing I would suggest is getting a Japanese keyboard for your own use. Your family can happily navigate the English OS and use the keyboard that comes with the PC, then when it comes to work you can swap in your Japanese keyboard. This isn't strictly necessary of course, but I find that little Language Bar to be a huge annoyance - maybe I'm just impatient! but with a Japanese keyboard you just need to hit a button to flip between Japanese and English.
If you do go for that, be sure to check with the store to make sure a JP keyboard can be used properly, shouldn't be a problem, but just to be on the safe side.
Good luck!


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