Resource: Italian dialect to official italian dictionary
Thread poster: Rosanna Palermo

Rosanna Palermo  Identity Verified
Local time: 10:57
Member (2006)
Italian to English

MODERATOR
Sep 3, 2007

Hi all

I found this dictionary and, although it does not offer English translation, I think that it is quite extensive as far as shedding light on the dialect of Italian Regions. I added it to my favorites and thought I should also share it with you

http://www.simonel.com/dizionario/dizionario0.html


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Robert Tucker
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:57
German to English
+ ...
Italian dialect dictionaries Sep 3, 2007

Also some Italian dialect dictionaries at:

http://www.dejudicibus.it/dizionario/

Click on the "Dizionario" tab and then scroll down to "Lingue e dialetti italiani".

But I've still not got to the bottom of "Funiculi, funicula" yet!


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Gianfranco Zecchino  Identity Verified
Local time: 17:57
German to Italian
+ ...
Thanks rfmoon.. Sep 3, 2007

..for this interesting source of information.
I've taken a look at the Sardinian version of some words and, despite some inaccuracies, found it often illuminating. The site is a sort of tip of the iceberg showing the huge variety and richness of the Italian dialects..
Like animals and plants, so have languages their "(bio)diversity": isn't it great? How wonderful that's so much variety

A si biri! ("see you" in "Campidanese"-Sardinian dialect)

Gianfranco


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Rosanna Palermo  Identity Verified
Local time: 10:57
Member (2006)
Italian to English

MODERATOR
TOPIC STARTER
Sardinian is sure colorful Sep 3, 2007

Gianfranco Zecchino wrote:

..for this interesting source of information.
I've taken a look at the Sardinian version of some words and, despite some inaccuracies, found it often illuminating. The site is a sort of tip of the iceberg showing the huge variety and richness of the Italian dialects..
Like animals and plants, so have languages their "(bio)diversity": isn't it great? How wonderful that's so much variety

A si biri! ("see you" in "Campidanese"-Sardinian dialect)

Gianfranco


Dear Gianfranco..thank you!
What a coincidence that you looked up the Sardinian..I was looking for authentic Italian recipies and, at my local library I found a book named "Sardegna in bocca" which surprisingly had recipies in Dialect, Italian and the English translation (a poor one if you ask me - but then again the book was done in 1982 and I guess we were not supposed to know any better..)
Some individual apparently borrowed the book before me and actually cut out whole pages,( the Italian/English ones) so I ended up trying to translate the dialect..This is how I found the dictionary...and re-invented the wheel.
Thanks again for the kind comments. Have a great day!

Rosy


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Rosanna Palermo  Identity Verified
Local time: 10:57
Member (2006)
Italian to English

MODERATOR
TOPIC STARTER
Your link is really nice thanks!! Sep 3, 2007

Robert Tucker wrote:

Also some Italian dialect dictionaries at:

http://www.dejudicibus.it/dizionario/

Click on the "Dizionario" tab and then scroll down to "Lingue e dialetti italiani".

But I've still not got to the bottom of "Funiculi, funicula" yet!


Well. Robert, according to Wikepedia..
Funiculì, Funiculà is a famous song written by Italian journalist Peppino Turco and set to music by Italian composer Luigi Denza in 1880. It was composed to commemorate the opening of the first funicular on Mount Vesuvius. It was sung for the first time in the Quisisana Hotel in Castellammare di Stabia and met with huge success. It was presented by Turco and Denza to the Piedigrotta's day during the same year.

Ciao!


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Robert Tucker
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:57
German to English
+ ...
Funiculì, Funiculà Sep 4, 2007

As the wiki continues it is in Neapolitan dialect, of course. Looking for the source of some of the words I found "jammo" as the first person plural of ghì (jì)- to go at:

http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Neapolitan/verbs

which links back to a Neapolitan grammar at:

http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Neapolitan/contents

Unfortunately, a search for Sardinian on the wiki did not turn up anything. Looking at other sites, the "limba sarda" appears rather more a different language than a dialect.


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Gianfranco Zecchino  Identity Verified
Local time: 17:57
German to Italian
+ ...
Thanks Robert Sep 4, 2007

I still haven't had the time to learn more about the program and the dictionaries, but it seems to be potentially immense..
Good luck with "Funiculì, funiculà"!

To Rosy:
The following link might help you with the recipies...(shame on the person who "wounded" the book).

http://www.toninorubattu.it/ita/DULS-SARDO-ITALIANO.htm

It's a Sardinian-Italian dictionary, with the Italian translation from various Sardinian dialects.
Ciao!


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Rosanna Palermo  Identity Verified
Local time: 10:57
Member (2006)
Italian to English

MODERATOR
TOPIC STARTER
The dictionary is awesome Sep 4, 2007

Wow Gianfranco..so far all of the words I could not find are already in your dictionary link..I am really going to be able to get cooking here!
Lobster sauce and stuffed calamari..here I come!
Thanks so much!!
)

Rosy
Gianfranco Zecchino wrote:

I still haven't had the time to learn more about the program and the dictionaries, but it seems to be potentially immense..
Good luck with "Funiculì, funiculà"!

To Rosy:
The following link might help you with the recipies...(shame on the person who "wounded" the book).

http://www.toninorubattu.it/ita/DULS-SARDO-ITALIANO.htm

It's a Sardinian-Italian dictionary, with the Italian translation from various Sardinian dialects.
Ciao!


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Gianfranco Zecchino  Identity Verified
Local time: 17:57
German to Italian
+ ...
:) Sep 4, 2007

rfmoon wrote:

Lobster sauce and stuffed calamari..here I come!

Rosy


Yum yum! Buon appetitooo!


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Rosanna Palermo  Identity Verified
Local time: 10:57
Member (2006)
Italian to English

MODERATOR
TOPIC STARTER
Your link for napolitan is great Sep 4, 2007

Robert Tucker wrote:

As the wiki continues it is in Neapolitan dialect, of course. Looking for the source of some of the words I found "jammo" as the first person plural of ghì (jì)- to go at:

http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Neapolitan/verbs

which links back to a Neapolitan grammar at:

http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Neapolitan/contents

Unfortunately, a search for Sardinian on the wiki did not turn up anything. Looking at other sites, the "limba sarda" appears rather more a different language than a dialect.



Hello there!
You have no clue of how much I laughed due to your link.
My Dad is originally from Naples but he was (retired now)became a professor so he speaks perfect Italian, while his sister - who still lives in the Naples area only speaks dialect. Growing up I could never understand 40% of what she was saying to me and, to this day, I am leary to call her because without the hand gestures/facial expression combination to help me out I am still limited in my understanding.

The link explained some of the sayings she still uses (explained in a much "polished up" and politically correct, not actually verbatum manner I must say).
Got to say that ouch, she can cast "darts" with the best of them and only now, thanks to you, I realise how many I missed..
My Dad just had surgery and now I can suprise him and cheer him up with his "home lingo" next time I call him.
Thanks!

Rosy


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Resource: Italian dialect to official italian dictionary

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