Can I use a "sister" software?
Thread poster: Dan Mackey

Dan Mackey
United States
Local time: 15:20
Arabic to English
Mar 23, 2017

I am going to start working with an agency that requires Wordfast. Is there any way I could use a free or cheaper alternative CAT tool, ideally "CafeTran Espresso" which I already have? I would prefer to avoid "Wordfast Anywhere" as it seems to be cumbersome and I am weary of working in the cloud...

I specifically use and am proficient with CafeTran Espresso as a ProZ plus member since it comes free with membership. Is there a way I can work with other translators and work with this agency while using CafeTran while they use Wordfast? Can I open their Wordfast files? Can I export my CafeTran projects in Wordfast format?

I am willing to entertain any suggestions, and I thank you all in advance!icon_smile.gif


 

esperantisto  Identity Verified
Local time: 22:20
Member (2006)
English to Russian
+ ...
More details Mar 23, 2017

You (or your agency) should give more details. For starters, which Wordfast is required? What is the source file format to process? What are you supposed to deliver?

 

Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 21:20
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
+ ...
@Dan Mar 23, 2017

Dan Mackey wrote:
I am going to start working with an agency that requires Wordfast. Is there any way I could use a free or cheaper alternative CAT tool, ideally "CafeTran Espresso" which I already have?


It's likely to be Wordfast Pro 3 (WFP3). I'm told that CafeTran can handle WFP3's TXML file format, but you'll have to ask on the CafeTran forum exactly how much of a support that is. You can install a demo version of WFP3 and use the bilingual review feature to convert TXML files to MS Word tables and import the translation back into WFP3. Ask the agency if they require WFP3 or WFP4.


 

neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 21:20
Spanish to English
+ ...
I thought it was cheap Mar 23, 2017

Compared to the market leader Trados, I thought WF was very reasonably priced, although I've had it for some years. I just checked online and apparently it costs €400 or €500 for a licence now, which I suppose is quite a lot, but if you're going to be getting a lot of work from the company/agency, it could be worthwhile.

 

Christel Zipfel  Identity Verified
Member (2004)
Italian to German
+ ...
Wordfast isn't *cheap* any more Mar 23, 2017

neilmac wrote:

Compared to the market leader Trados, I thought WF was very reasonably priced, although I've had it for some years. I just checked online and apparently it costs €400 or €500 for a licence now, which I suppose is quite a lot, but if you're going to be getting a lot of work from the company/agency, it could be worthwhile.


Many years ago, maybe it was. I bought it, back in 2004, if I remember well, at 60 Euros (some special offer). So the price increase in the meantime has been considerable.

But fortunately, you don't have to pay the full price each time your licence has expired. Anyway, I still find today it's rather expensive (for a new licence) and I hope it doesn't go up further.


 

Mario Chavez (X)  Identity Verified
Local time: 15:20
English to Spanish
+ ...
Sister software? Mar 23, 2017

I've never heard of the expression ″sister software.″ Anyone has any idea of its origin?

First, working as a professional, one has to have the right tools, just not free software. If perchance your clients learn that you are a translator who uses free software to do their translations, they might feel less inclined to give you work at sensible rates. In other words, why pay a translator $0.10/word (example) if this translator is using free software? After all, even MS Office 2007 cost money.

Another problem with free software is that its shelf-life is far shorter than paid software, and it doesn't always have reliable tech support, patches, security fixes and the like.


 

Heinrich Pesch  Identity Verified
Finland
Local time: 22:20
Member (2003)
Finnish to German
+ ...
Be open Mar 24, 2017

Do not use other software if you client insists on a special tool. Rather decline and look for jobs elsewhere. But perhaps your client can sent you the source file for translation. Just tell them your problem. If they have big projects it could be reasonable to buy WFP.
I think CafeTran is good stuff, but have not have the time to use it.


 

CafeTran Training (X)
Netherlands
Local time: 21:20
It seems to work Mar 24, 2017

Samuel Murray wrote:

I'm told that CafeTran can handle WFP3's TXML file format, but you'll have to ask on the CafeTran forum exactly how much of a support that is.


I've tested WFP3's TXML file forma in the past:

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/509643/ct-wiki/cafetran.wikidot.com/wordfast-pro.html

Here's a posting about WFP4's TXLF:

http://www.proz.com/forum/cafetran_support/313285-wordfast_pro_4_cafetran_wordfast_pro_4.html


 

John Di Rico  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 21:20
Member (2006)
French to English
Inquire about remote server assets Mar 24, 2017

Dan Mackey wrote:

I am going to start working with an agency that requires Wordfast. Is there any way I could use a free or cheaper alternative CAT tool, ideally "CafeTran Espresso" which I already have? I would prefer to avoid "Wordfast Anywhere" as it seems to be cumbersome and I am weary of working in the cloud...

I specifically use and am proficient with CafeTran Espresso as a ProZ plus member since it comes free with membership. Is there a way I can work with other translators and work with this agency while using CafeTran while they use Wordfast? Can I open their Wordfast files? Can I export my CafeTran projects in Wordfast format?

I am willing to entertain any suggestions, and I thank you all in advance!icon_smile.gif


Hi Dan,
I would ask your agency if they expect you to connect to a remote server TM or glossary. If so, you should check to see if CafeTran can connect to it (I doubt it). WFC, WFP and WFA allow you to connect to Wordfast Server TMs.
Another consideration is the relationship with your client. I have a client that uses SDL Trados and would like me to use it to so I can connect to their SDL Trados remote server TM. However, they are willing to work around me not having it because a) I can receive pre-translated SDLXLIFF files, translate and deliver them and b) they want to work with me. In the end, with good clients, the person is more important than the tool.
If you can handle Wordfast files with another tool that you are proficient with and you make your client happy, more power to you!

Best,
John


 

Daniel Fernandes  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 16:20
French to Portuguese
+ ...
You should talk to your Project Manager Mar 24, 2017

You should talk to your Project Manager.

1) I've heard that some agencies buy cat-tool licenses for the translator, and the translator would use the tool as long as he/she would work for the agency. It could be the case for this agency, but if you don't ask, you'll never know.

2) When translating a file format (i.e. Wordfast TMXL) in a tool that isn't the same as the one used to create that file (i.e. CafeTran Espresso), you should be able to test and check if everything is where it should be.

Mario Chavez wrote:

I've never heard of the expression ″sister software.″ Anyone has any idea of its origin?

First, working as a professional, one has to have the right tools, just not free software. If perchance your clients learn that you are a translator who uses free software to do their translations, they might feel less inclined to give you work at sensible rates. In other words, why pay a translator $0.10/word (example) if this translator is using free software? After all, even MS Office 2007 cost money.

Another problem with free software is that its shelf-life is far shorter than paid software, and it doesn't always have reliable tech support, patches, security fixes and the like.



3) Mario, I don't want to change the subject of this thread, but what's the problem with working with free/libre software applications? 2 years ago, I didn't know how to differentiate it:

"Free software” means software that respects users' freedom and community. Roughly, it means that the users have the freedom to run, copy, distribute, study, change and improve the software. Thus, “free software” is a matter of liberty, not price. To understand the concept, you should think of “free” as in “free speech,” not as in “free beer”. We sometimes call it “libre software,” borrowing the French or Spanish word for “free” as in freedom, to show we do not mean the software is gratis." (https://goo.gl/40umo)

4) I suggest everyone to read this article https://goo.gl/kOrqvf (from 2014). It talks about the growth of OmegaT (a free/libre software, not a "free beer" software).


 

Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 21:20
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
+ ...
Re connecting to the TM/glossary server Mar 24, 2017

John Di Rico wrote:
[You should] ask your agency if they expect you to connect to a remote server TM or glossary. If so, you should check to see if CafeTran can connect to it (I doubt it). WFC, WFP and WFA allow you to connect to Wordfast Server TMs.


I had a client that insisted that I connect to the server TM and glossary, but I often found that the TM and/or glossary was empty. I was able to use WFA to check how many segments/items there were in the server TMs/glossaries, to determine how really important it was to actually connect to them during translation.


 

John Di Rico  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 21:20
Member (2006)
French to English
Yes, but no real-time collaboration Mar 24, 2017

[quote]Samuel Murray wrote:


I was able to use WFA to check how many segments/items there were in the server TMs/glossaries, to determine how really important it was to actually connect to them during translation.


If there are several people working on different documents at the same time, server TMs ensure greater consistency upstream because you get matches in real-time but more importantly can do concordance search when hesitating between two words (did someone else already translate this in the meantime and how?).

However, I see your point. I sometimes get an SDL Trados package with a TM in it that I rush to convert, only to realize there is nothing in it!

John


 

Mario Chavez (X)  Identity Verified
Local time: 15:20
English to Spanish
+ ...
Free software, not open source software Mar 24, 2017

Mario Chavez wrote:

I've never heard of the expression ″sister software.″ Anyone has any idea of its origin?

First, working as a professional, one has to have the right tools, just not free software. If perchance your clients learn that you are a translator who uses free software to do their translations, they might feel less inclined to give you work at sensible rates. In other words, why pay a translator $0.10/word (example) if this translator is using free software? After all, even MS Office 2007 cost money.

Another problem with free software is that its shelf-life is far shorter than paid software, and it doesn't always have reliable tech support, patches, security fixes and the like.



3) Mario, I don't want to change the subject of this thread, but what's the problem with working with free/libre software applications? 2 years ago, I didn't know how to differentiate it:

"Free software” means software that respects users' freedom and community. Roughly, it means that the users have the freedom to run, copy, distribute, study, change and improve the software. Thus, “free software” is a matter of liberty, not price. To understand the concept, you should think of “free” as in “free speech,” not as in “free beer”. We sometimes call it “libre software,” borrowing the French or Spanish word for “free” as in freedom, to show we do not mean the software is gratis." (https://goo.gl/40umo)

4) I suggest everyone to read this article https://goo.gl/kOrqvf (from 2014). It talks about the growth of OmegaT (a free/libre software, not a "free beer" software).

[/quote]

Hi, and allow me to clarify: there is a difference between free (no cost) software and open source (free to distribute) software. A browser is the former, Linux distros are an example of the latter.

There are some cool open-source packages such as OpenOffice, a substitute for the pricey MS Office suite. Unlike free software, OpenOffice has the support of its communities and its developers. For graphic designers, Linux (or Ubuntu, etc.) offers the possibility to use a substitute suite for the pricey Adobe Creative Suite.

So, free software = software gratis/open source software = software libre

Cheers.

Mario


 


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