publicity

English translation: No junk mail!

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:publicity
English translation:No junk mail!
Entered by: Yasutomo Kanazawa

00:04 Dec 3, 2009
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Advertising / Public Relations
English term or phrase: publicity
I saw on a letter box"please no publicity". Is it correct? I would say "no advertise".
Thanks
francesca mainardi
No junk mail!
Explanation:
or you could add "please" at the end if you want to sound nice.
Selected response from:

Yasutomo Kanazawa
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +8No junk mail!
Yasutomo Kanazawa
5Can you read -- I don't want junk!
Charlesp
4 +1No flyers
John Detre
5No Advertising Material (please)
David Hollywood
5 -1No Admail
Charlesp
4 -1'No publicity, please'
Robin Levey
5 -3Post no bills / No advertiseMENT
David Russi
Summary of reference entries provided
Red Dot Campaign
Charlesp

Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
'No publicity, please'


Explanation:
One option is 'No publicity, please'.

Many English-speaking people use slightly stronger language: "NO JUNK MAIL!"

Robin Levey
Chile
Local time: 06:56
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  David Russi: I'm not going to spill red on you, but I think NO JUNK MAIL is the answer you should have given...
8 mins

neutral  Travelin Ann: does not work for the US
1 hr

neutral  B D Finch: "No publicity" in the UK, means something like please don't put our names, or mention this event in the press or media.
9 hrs

disagree  Charlesp: could be, if it was a famous actor/actress!
4 days
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -3
Post no bills / No advertiseMENT


Explanation:
I would consider "please no publicity" odd, but also "no advertise"

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Note added at 36 mins (2009-12-03 00:41:55 GMT)
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In the US, I believe that "no publicity" would seem odd, though in the UK that may be appropriate.

And yes, Post no bills would be to keep people from posting advertising of any sort, and may not be what the context implied.

David Russi
United States
Local time: 03:56
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Robin Levey: 'Post no bills' refers to the sticking of advertising or propaganda on walls and does not address asker's question. 'no advertisement' is, frankly, irrelevant here. Asker's label on the letter-box should be 'No Junk Mail (please)'.
4 mins
  -> Hmmm... I understood this to be a sign saying that you should no post any other signs on the letterbox, but you may be right.

neutral  Travelin Ann: In the US, "post no bills" means do not put a billboard (or equivalent) here, Has nothing to do with a personal postbox/mailbox/ mail slot.
2 hrs
  -> Yes, I know what it means, I simply understood the question in a different way: a mailbox where drop mail is dropped (as in a post ffice drop), where they would not want advertisements posted....

disagree  B D Finch: The police have been trying to arrest Mr. Bill Posters for years, but he doesn't stick his bills on people's letter boxes! "No publicity" in the UK, means something like please don't put our names, or mention this event in the press or media.
9 hrs
  -> So you agree with me, it is strange in this context...

disagree  Charlesp: I agree (with Finsh and mediamatrix)
4 days
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49 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +8
No junk mail!


Explanation:
or you could add "please" at the end if you want to sound nice.

Yasutomo Kanazawa
Native speaker of: Japanese
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Hollywood: this is spot on IMO :) (and I would add the "please" or maybe "thanks")
1 hr
  -> Thank you David

neutral  Travelin Ann: works for email but not for snail mail
2 hrs

agree  Liam Hamilton
4 hrs
  -> Thank you Liam

agree  Jack Doughty: If I put up a sign like this, I don't think I would want to sound nice!
7 hrs
  -> Thank you Jack

agree  Tony M: 'junk mail' is very commonly used for paper snail mail (and was, indeed, long before e-mail even existed)
7 hrs
  -> Thank you Tony!

agree  Woodstock: This is what would be used in my neck of the woods (US).
7 hrs
  -> Thank you Woodstock

agree  Goldcoaster
8 hrs
  -> Thank you Goldcoaster

agree  B D Finch: I recall it being used for snail mail before the days of PCs, never mind email.
9 hrs
  -> Thank you BD

agree  Trudy Peters: Don't know how much good it would do, though. It's not the letter carrier's responsibility to decide what's junk mail.
18 hrs
  -> Thank you Trudy
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
No Advertising Material (please)


Explanation:
18 Nov 2008 ... The No Advertising Material initiative aims to reduce the amount of junk mail delivered to local homes and businesses, keeping Mosman free ...
www.mosman.nsw.gov.au/news/.../no-advertising-material - Cached - Similar
Free 'No Advertising Material' sign [Archive] - Bub Hub Pregnancy ...14 posts - 5 authors
[Archive] Free 'No Advertising Material' sign Environmental & Green Issues.
www.bubhub.com.au › ... › Environmental & Green Issues - Cached - Similar

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Note added at 1 hr (2009-12-03 01:56:10 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

or even better would be: "No Advertising Material, thanks"



David Hollywood
Local time: 06:56
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 6

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Travelin Ann: does not work for the US; would be EXTREMELY useful is Asker would inform us about target audience
1 hr

agree  Tony M: Would also be usable in the UK.
6 hrs

neutral  Woodstock: Maybe not completely wrong, but too wordy for US - and too long for most mailboxes.
6 hrs

disagree  Charlesp: Ok, but I agree with Woodstock above, too wordy.
4 days
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
No flyers


Explanation:
this is what I usually see

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Note added at 1 day23 hrs (2009-12-05 00:00:27 GMT)
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In Canada this is fairly standard -- don't know about US or UK usage. The logic behind it is that, as Trudy has observed, you can't expect letter carriers to decide what is junk mail. In fact, they are legally required to deliver all addressed mail, junk or not, sign or no sign.

However, you can (and many people do) put up signs to ban the flyers, circulars, coupons, etc. that local merchants have distributed door to door. Hence the term "No flyers."

As Anne has said, it would be good to know what country we're talking about.

John Detre
Canada
Works in field
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Trudy Peters: Another option / The more I think about it, this may be the best option!
22 hrs
  -> Thanks Trudy. Judging by the chorus of approval for "no junk mail" I suspect it depends on the country. See my added note above.

agree  Veronika McLaren: I see that most often (Canada)!
1 day 19 hrs

disagree  Charlesp: As private flyers can't be put in a letterbox (at least not legally), what is meant here must be a message to the postal service.
4 days
  -> Thanks for your comment but you're wrong. It depends on the jurisdiction. Where I live, private flyers can and are put in letter boxes all the time. No such message can be addressed to the postal service, which is legally required to deliver all mail.
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4 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
No Admail


Explanation:
“No Admail” tells the post not to put non-personally addressed admail in the letterbox.

As private flyers can't be put in a letterbox (at least not legally), what i meant here must be a message to the postal service.

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Note added at 4 days (2009-12-07 08:28:26 GMT)
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re unaddressed materials, See eg Canada Post will no longer deliver the following mail items: free samples, coupons, flyers and newspapers, government mailings, free distribution magazines, catalogues, non-profit and event information.

The only unaddressed materials that Canada Post will continue to deliver to these customers are as follows: community newspapers, as well as House of Commons, provincial chief electoral officers, municipal electoral offices and Elections Canada mailings.

https://ssl.postescanada-canadapost.ca/corporate/about/conta...

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Note added at 5 days (2009-12-08 12:18:52 GMT)
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As for the UK - see here: www.stopjunkmail.org.uk/guide/door_to_door_opt_out.php

Opt out of Royal Mail's 'door-to-door' service
(Unfortunately, Royal Mail has never done much to promote the door-to-door opt-out and as a result few people know it exists.)



Charlesp
Sweden
Local time: 11:56
Works in field
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  John Detre: As your own source states, Canada Post does not deliver unadressed mail in any event, and it is legally required to deliver addressed mail, so the message can't be to the letter carrier. I have never seen a sign that says "No admail."
23 mins
  -> Just because you don't know about it doesnt mean it doesnt exist. Anyway, if you had bothered to look at the reference posted you would have seen it. Shows how it is important to keep up-to-date.
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5 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Can you read -- I don't want junk!


Explanation:
A sign saying "Can you read -- I don't want junk" might work, maybe.

Charlesp
Sweden
Local time: 11:56
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
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Reference comments


4 days peer agreement (net): -1
Reference: Red Dot Campaign

Reference information:
in Canada

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 days (2009-12-08 12:10:36 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

See Canada Post's new green choices program and more info on Consumers Choice.
http://www.canadapost.ca/corporate/about/green/Consumer/part...
https://ssl.postescanada-canadapost.ca/corporate/about/conta...
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* Note: This opt-out policy varies by letter carrier and region in Canada. If your “No Admail” sign is ignored, please call or send a letter to your nearest postal outlet or call.


    Reference: http://www.reddotcampaign.ca/
Charlesp
Sweden
Works in field
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
disagree  John Detre: Red dot campaign signs say "no junk mail" - how does this support you?//I'm telling you what I see in real life. What basis can you have for telling people who live in Canada what signs are actually used in Canada? Other signs may be common elsewhere.
31 mins
  -> Make the effort to visit the site and read it before commenting.
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