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it's raining old women with clubs

English translation: "dit reën ou meide met knopkieries"

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16:25 Nov 14, 2008
Afrikaans to English translations [PRO]
Other
Afrikaans term or phrase: it's raining old women with clubs
Confirming that in Afrikaans (and asking how it's written) the phrase "it's raining old women with clubs" is something similar to "it's raining cats and dogs" in English.
James Mc Allister
Local time: 14:45
English translation:"dit reën ou meide met knopkieries"
Explanation:
The expression "raining old women with knob kieries" is indeed an
Afrikaans one, but it is considered as racially charged, as in the
Afrikaans, "dit reën ou meide met knopkieries", the word "meide"
refers to black women in a derogatory way.

"Meid" is the word that was used to refer to black and coloured
women during the Apartheid era, and is considered offensive.
Originally, the word came from the Dutch word "meid" for
"maid"/"servant", but as it was only used to refer to black and
coloured women in service to white households here in the Cape
since the 1700s, its usage slowly changed to become an epithet of
sorts.

So, to depoliticise the expression, instead of using "dit reën
ou meide met knopkieries", one could just use "dit reën ou
vrouens met knopkieries", where "vrouens" only means "women". Any
Afrikaans-speaking person would, however, immediately know that
the word "meide" is omitted and insinuated by that omission.
Selected response from:

Mariènne Botha
Local time: 15:45
Grading comment
Hi Marienne,

I appreciate the help and information you have provided for my question, thanks very much.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3"dit reën ou meide met knopkieries"Mariènne Botha
5 +1dit reen ou tannies met knopkieriesAnnabel Rautenbach
3Dit reen oumeide met knopkieries
Sue Stewart-Anderson


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


57 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Dit reen oumeide met knopkieries


Explanation:
Or: Dit reen ou vrouens met knopkieries

I have heard the expression before but I'm not a native speaker so please don't take my version as gospel. That second e in reen should have two dots above it.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2008-11-14 17:29:56 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, ou meide should be two words.

Sue Stewart-Anderson
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:45
Native speaker of: English
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
dit reen ou tannies met knopkieries


Explanation:
Old Afrikaans saying meaning it is raining cats and dogs

Annabel Rautenbach
Local time: 15:45
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in AfrikaansAfrikaans
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  fhzwiers: Ou tannies en ou meide are both used . Ou meide refer more to the old dutch origin where one would use words such as "Wat ben jij een leuke meid!" . I assume it has now become more 'Afrikaans ' to say 'tannies', moving away from the dutch way.
3 hrs
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16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
"dit reën ou meide met knopkieries"


Explanation:
The expression "raining old women with knob kieries" is indeed an
Afrikaans one, but it is considered as racially charged, as in the
Afrikaans, "dit reën ou meide met knopkieries", the word "meide"
refers to black women in a derogatory way.

"Meid" is the word that was used to refer to black and coloured
women during the Apartheid era, and is considered offensive.
Originally, the word came from the Dutch word "meid" for
"maid"/"servant", but as it was only used to refer to black and
coloured women in service to white households here in the Cape
since the 1700s, its usage slowly changed to become an epithet of
sorts.

So, to depoliticise the expression, instead of using "dit reën
ou meide met knopkieries", one could just use "dit reën ou
vrouens met knopkieries", where "vrouens" only means "women". Any
Afrikaans-speaking person would, however, immediately know that
the word "meide" is omitted and insinuated by that omission.

Mariènne Botha
Local time: 15:45
Native speaker of: Native in AfrikaansAfrikaans, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Hi Marienne,

I appreciate the help and information you have provided for my question, thanks very much.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Anita du Plessis
8 hrs

agree  Kas Smit
1 day21 hrs

agree  Eugene Seegers
308 days
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