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getmeer قِطمير

English translation: crumb

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Arabic term or phrase:قطمير
English translation:crumb
Entered by: Fuad Yahya
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21:50 Aug 14, 2001
Arabic to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
Arabic term or phrase: getmeer قِطمير
fine and transparent cover usually found between pit and pulb of date fruit.
ALWALEED
Local time: 01:00
a crumb
Explanation:
It is not clear to me whether you are asking for a translation of the word QITMEER or an equivalent term to carry the same meaning of a miniscule object of insignificant value, as in the Quar’anic verse 35:13

يُولج اللَيلَ في النَهار ويُولج النَهارَ في اللَيل وسَـخَّرَ الشَـمسَ والقَمَرَ كُلٌّ يَجري لأَجَل مُسَـمّىً ذلكُم الله رَبُّكم لَه الملكُ والذين تَدعُونَ من دُونه ما يَملكُون من قِطمير

If it is the former, you are basically out of luck. Languages are not born complete with a word for each item in nature. Rather, names are set for items as need arises, and cultures vary in their needs, giving rise to widely divergent word inventories. For example, in my town, we use the term KARABA for the widest part of the palm frond that attaches directly to the palm trunk. I don’t know that the name translates into any other language or dialect, because, although palm trees are found all over the world, not every society needs to identify that part by name. We needed to, because that piece of dry wood was the main source of fuel for bakery ovens. Likewise, pre-Islamic Arabs had a social need to identify the QITMEER by name. The English-speaking world never experienced that need.

On the other hand, if you are trying to translate the Qur’anic verse or a similar expression in which the word is used to signify an object of tiny size and insignificant value, then I would suggest a word like “crumb,” which is likewise suggestive of a tiny bit of a food leftover of insignificant value. One often hears expressions like, "My rich aunt did not leave me a crumb in her will."

Other words that you may want to try are “speck,” “iota,” or “atom.” All of these words signify both miniscule amount and insignificant value.

Fuad
Selected response from:

Fuad Yahya
Grading comment
that what i want.
thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
naa crumb
Fuad Yahya


  

Answers


15 hrs
a crumb


Explanation:
It is not clear to me whether you are asking for a translation of the word QITMEER or an equivalent term to carry the same meaning of a miniscule object of insignificant value, as in the Quar’anic verse 35:13

يُولج اللَيلَ في النَهار ويُولج النَهارَ في اللَيل وسَـخَّرَ الشَـمسَ والقَمَرَ كُلٌّ يَجري لأَجَل مُسَـمّىً ذلكُم الله رَبُّكم لَه الملكُ والذين تَدعُونَ من دُونه ما يَملكُون من قِطمير

If it is the former, you are basically out of luck. Languages are not born complete with a word for each item in nature. Rather, names are set for items as need arises, and cultures vary in their needs, giving rise to widely divergent word inventories. For example, in my town, we use the term KARABA for the widest part of the palm frond that attaches directly to the palm trunk. I don’t know that the name translates into any other language or dialect, because, although palm trees are found all over the world, not every society needs to identify that part by name. We needed to, because that piece of dry wood was the main source of fuel for bakery ovens. Likewise, pre-Islamic Arabs had a social need to identify the QITMEER by name. The English-speaking world never experienced that need.

On the other hand, if you are trying to translate the Qur’anic verse or a similar expression in which the word is used to signify an object of tiny size and insignificant value, then I would suggest a word like “crumb,” which is likewise suggestive of a tiny bit of a food leftover of insignificant value. One often hears expressions like, "My rich aunt did not leave me a crumb in her will."

Other words that you may want to try are “speck,” “iota,” or “atom.” All of these words signify both miniscule amount and insignificant value.

Fuad



    American Heritage Dictionary
Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2542
Grading comment
that what i want.
thanks
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