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ÚáÇÏÇ áÚæäÇ

English translation: Additional Information

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13:19 Aug 28, 2001
Arabic to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
Arabic term or phrase: ÚáÇÏÇ áÚæäÇ
علادا لعونا
Gladys Amaya
English translation:Additional Information
Explanation:
Here is some additional information about the DAL’ONA form, with samples of both text and music. First, here is a straightforward definition:

http://www.barghouti.com/folklore/songs/

“Dal'ona is the song of the Palestinian popular dance, dabka, where the dancers sing it along with the sound of shubbabah (flute), yarghool, or mijwiz.

Second to 'ataba, dal'ona is the most popular song [form]. It is easier to compose a dal'ona song than 'ataba because it does not require the similar sound of the ends of the first three verses. However, like 'ataba, dal'ona has four verses of poetry where the first three have similar endings and the fourth usually ends with a sound like (oana).”

This corroborates my thinking about DAL’ONA being simply a compositional device.

The same site gives the following two samples of DAL’ONA couplets:

Sample 1:

http://www.barghouti.com/folklore/songs/dalona1.html

yally marreity o beidik sallamty
asraar il-maHabby ibqalby 'allamty
ismi'it Sootik lamma itkallamty
bulbul beyghanny fooq el-zaytoona


Sample 2:

http://www.barghouti.com/folklore/songs/dalona2.html

ya Teirin Taayir fissama il-'aaly
sallim 'al-Hilw il-'azeez il-ghaaly
wismik ya rooHy mayrooH min baaly
imqayyad 'ajbeeny bein li'yoona


For those who wish to sample the sound of authentic Palestinian DAL’ONA, here is a recording by Ahmad Madaniyya

http://www.barghouti.com/folklore/songs/sounds/dal3ona1.ram


Fuad
Selected response from:

Fuad Yahya
Grading comment
i want to thank you for your answer really it was of great help for me, as i like to read about cultures and sometimes find words or expresions i cannot understand.

Again thank you very much for the explanation given.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +2Additional InformationFuad Yahya
na +1على دلعونةFuad Yahya
naplease repost your questionMona Helal
naAlaanWilliam Meyer


  

Answers


53 mins
Alaan


Explanation:
If you could transliterate the word, maybe I could be of more help. Thanks

William Meyer
Grading comment
is the only data i have, and i don't know arabic
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)
The asker has declined this answer
Comment: is the only data i have, and i don't know arabic

2 hrs
please repost your question


Explanation:
It's illegible. The words in the explanation box are not much help either.

Regards


Mona Helal
Local time: 11:36
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 553
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
على دلعونة


Explanation:
I have only heard the phrase pronounced 'ALA DAL'ONA, but have seen it spelled in all sorts of ways, both in Arabic and in Latin letters.

As a child, I was aware of the phrase only in the context of the well-known refrain, sung by almost every Lebanese singer (Sabah, Fairouz, Nasri Shamseddeen, Wadee' Al-Safi, etc.) as well as some Syrian singers (there is even a humorous rendition by Duraid Lahham).

Up until recently, and precisely because of the popular refrain, I thought that DAL'ONA was a place name, and that the musical couplet was indigenous only to Syria and Lebanon. The phrase sounded like "Let us go to Dal'ona."

Looking through the Internet, however, I found out that, one, DAL'ONA is a form of dance music (actually dance and music), closely related to the Dabka, and, two, that it is just as well known in Palestine. Here is a link to a page with releveant ethnomusicological information:

http://www.angelfire.com/tx3/dabka/music.html

"Dal'ouna, a strong icon in traditional dabka, is one of our [Palestinian] most well known dances, with its powerful steps, energetic leaps and spins. Al shabab add a unique and contemporary style to Dal'ouna, while keeping its tradition strong. It is a sure crowd pleaser.

Al Yarghoul is also an instrument used to play Dal'ouna. It is often compared to the sound of bagpipes. Al Yarghoul adds a special accent to any song, yet when it comes to al dabka, al yarghoul gives the dabka song an extra boost of energy."

So what does "ALA DAL'ONA" mean? I believe it is a phrase whose "meaning" is almost purely musical; i.e., it has no significant cognitive content amenable to translation, but merely serves to establish a quick dancing rhythm and to form part of a rhyming couplet.

If you insist, you can translate it as "On to the dal'ona," or "let's dal'ona," if I may dare turn it into a verb.

The subject is certainly ripe for further research. I would love to hear more about it from the other members.

Fuad

Note: I could not read the term that you posted, only the "explanation". are you using a Mac?


    Reference: http://www.angelfire.com/tx3/dabka/music.html
Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2542

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  AhmedAMS
36 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 days 6 hrs peer agreement (net): +2
Additional Information


Explanation:
Here is some additional information about the DAL’ONA form, with samples of both text and music. First, here is a straightforward definition:

http://www.barghouti.com/folklore/songs/

“Dal'ona is the song of the Palestinian popular dance, dabka, where the dancers sing it along with the sound of shubbabah (flute), yarghool, or mijwiz.

Second to 'ataba, dal'ona is the most popular song [form]. It is easier to compose a dal'ona song than 'ataba because it does not require the similar sound of the ends of the first three verses. However, like 'ataba, dal'ona has four verses of poetry where the first three have similar endings and the fourth usually ends with a sound like (oana).”

This corroborates my thinking about DAL’ONA being simply a compositional device.

The same site gives the following two samples of DAL’ONA couplets:

Sample 1:

http://www.barghouti.com/folklore/songs/dalona1.html

yally marreity o beidik sallamty
asraar il-maHabby ibqalby 'allamty
ismi'it Sootik lamma itkallamty
bulbul beyghanny fooq el-zaytoona


Sample 2:

http://www.barghouti.com/folklore/songs/dalona2.html

ya Teirin Taayir fissama il-'aaly
sallim 'al-Hilw il-'azeez il-ghaaly
wismik ya rooHy mayrooH min baaly
imqayyad 'ajbeeny bein li'yoona


For those who wish to sample the sound of authentic Palestinian DAL’ONA, here is a recording by Ahmad Madaniyya

http://www.barghouti.com/folklore/songs/sounds/dal3ona1.ram


Fuad



    See citations above
Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2542
Grading comment
i want to thank you for your answer really it was of great help for me, as i like to read about cultures and sometimes find words or expresions i cannot understand.

Again thank you very much for the explanation given.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mona Helal: Brilliant as always, Fuad.
3 days 4 hrs

agree  AhmedAMS
33 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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