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ana bamot feake

English translation: I love you so much, I could die

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Arabic term or phrase:ana bamot feake
English translation:I love you so much, I could die
Entered by: Mona Helal
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23:48 Dec 20, 2001
Arabic to English translations [Non-PRO]
Arabic term or phrase: ana bamot feake
I am having a hard time with this one. "ana bamot feake" I am told that this is a sentance from a region with 5 letters but only contains one of folloving "a,e,i,o,u,ü". I think the only country which fullfills this sircumstances is egypt. I spent few hours in internet trying to find an eygptian text but realized that the official language of egypt is arabic. you are my last hope proffesor. please help me.
ulas
I love you so much, I could die
Explanation:
This is my suggestion. It's not a literal translation because the literal translation was given by my previous colleagues.
I know the literal translation may not sound the best in English but it's very common in Arabic both colloquial Egyptian (ana bamoot feake)and Lebanese (te'bourini).

The suggestion I am giving above is the closest I could think of in English given its common and widespread use.

HTH
Selected response from:

Mona Helal
Local time: 12:42
Grading comment
1 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3I Love you to deathdasheed6
4 +1I love you to deathFuad Yahya
4I love you so much, I could dieMona Helal


  

Answers


44 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
I Love you to death


Explanation:
Ana: I
Bamout: Die
Feake: In you

This a colloquial way used in the Mid East to say "I love a lot".

Each word separately does not make much sence. String 'em together and it means a lot.

dasheed6
United States
Local time: 20:42
PRO pts in pair: 3

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Fuad Yahya: You beat me to it by a few key strokes!
5 mins

agree  DINA MOHAMED
1 day 12 hrs

agree  AhmedAMS
13 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

47 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
I love you to death


Explanation:
ANA BAMOOT FEEKI: I love you to death (addressed to a female).

ANA = I

BAMOOT = die

FEEKI = in [love with] you (addressed to a female)

The language is Arabic. The dialect is Egyptian or East Mediterranean.

To a male, you would say ANA BAMOOT FEEK.

Fuad

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Note added at 2001-12-23 05:12:56 (GMT)
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Regarding the other statements in your question about the number of letters, the number of vowels, Egypt, and the Arabic language: As you correctly stated, Arabic is the official language of Egypt, but more importantly, the spoken language in Egypt is a modern Arabic dialect. As to the number of letters or sounds, classical Arabic uses 34 phonemes (28 consonant sounds and six vowels). These sounds are represented by a much larger number of graphemes (letters and diacritical signs). Colloquial Arabic (in Egypt as well as in other Arab regions) has a slightly different phonemic set. I hope this addresses that part of your question.

Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2542

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  AhmedAMS
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 23 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
I love you so much, I could die


Explanation:
This is my suggestion. It's not a literal translation because the literal translation was given by my previous colleagues.
I know the literal translation may not sound the best in English but it's very common in Arabic both colloquial Egyptian (ana bamoot feake)and Lebanese (te'bourini).

The suggestion I am giving above is the closest I could think of in English given its common and widespread use.

HTH

Mona Helal
Local time: 12:42
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 553
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