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سامي الاسكافي

English translation: Sami Al-Iskafi, possibly the name of the sender, the recipient, or some subtle joke

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18:24 Mar 8, 2001
Arabic to English translations [Non-PRO]
Arabic term or phrase: سامي الاسكافي
i got it as a b-day card
s
English translation:Sami Al-Iskafi, possibly the name of the sender, the recipient, or some subtle joke
Explanation:
There has got to be more to the B-Card than this. I can't imagine a birthday card with nothing on it except these two words.

Did the birthday card have any pre-printed "sentiment" on it that can shed some light on this mystery?

If the B-card had a pre-printed sentiment on it, and the Arabic words that you transcribed here were the only handwritten words, they could simply be the first and last name of the sender, his signature, so to speak. Sami is a very common male name, while Al-Iskafi is a common family name throughout the Middle East.

If these two words are pre-printed on the card, then the sender must have had some cards designed with his name on them to be used as generic greeting cards on which he could inscribe an appropriate sentiment for whatever occasion.

The two words could also be the first and last name of the recipient. You signed your name here as "S." Is your name Sami, Sammy, Sam, or Samuel?


As Alaa explained, "Al-Iskafi" means "the cobbler," but there may not be any significance to that. If it is not the last name of either the sender or the receiver, then it could be a private joke of some kind, in which case you would be in a much better position to figure it out than any of us. Are you or the sender in the shoe business? Do the two of you have a private joke about shoe repair?

Whatever the case may be, have a very happy birthday.

Fuad
Selected response from:

Fuad Yahya
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4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naMore information would helpMona Helal
naSami Al-Iskafi, possibly the name of the sender, the recipient, or some subtle jokeFuad Yahya
naSami the cobbler
Alaa Zeineldine


  

Answers


42 mins
Sami the cobbler


Explanation:
This is a straightforward translation. Iskafi is one who mends or makes shoes, so is cobbler.

Alaa Zeineldine
Egypt
Local time: 10:08
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 431

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
AhmedAMS
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1 hr
Sami Al-Iskafi, possibly the name of the sender, the recipient, or some subtle joke


Explanation:
There has got to be more to the B-Card than this. I can't imagine a birthday card with nothing on it except these two words.

Did the birthday card have any pre-printed "sentiment" on it that can shed some light on this mystery?

If the B-card had a pre-printed sentiment on it, and the Arabic words that you transcribed here were the only handwritten words, they could simply be the first and last name of the sender, his signature, so to speak. Sami is a very common male name, while Al-Iskafi is a common family name throughout the Middle East.

If these two words are pre-printed on the card, then the sender must have had some cards designed with his name on them to be used as generic greeting cards on which he could inscribe an appropriate sentiment for whatever occasion.

The two words could also be the first and last name of the recipient. You signed your name here as "S." Is your name Sami, Sammy, Sam, or Samuel?


As Alaa explained, "Al-Iskafi" means "the cobbler," but there may not be any significance to that. If it is not the last name of either the sender or the receiver, then it could be a private joke of some kind, in which case you would be in a much better position to figure it out than any of us. Are you or the sender in the shoe business? Do the two of you have a private joke about shoe repair?

Whatever the case may be, have a very happy birthday.

Fuad


Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2542
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
AhmedAMS

samarh32
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4 hrs
More information would help


Explanation:
Was the card writer addressing you, or was he signing the card using this name?
If he was addressing you, was he using this as a nickname?
Like I said, more information would help.
Thanks
Mona

Mona Helal
Local time: 19:08
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 553

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
AhmedAMS
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