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al-Abzari

English translation: The Tool Vendor or the Stationery Man

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Arabic term or phrase:al-Abzari
English translation:The Tool Vendor or the Stationery Man
Entered by: Fuad Yahya
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21:17 May 21, 2001
Arabic to English translations [Non-PRO]
Arabic term or phrase: al-Abzari
in a surname
Hamish Bear Shoulders
"The Stationery Man"
Explanation:
This surname is Persian, not Arabic.

In Farsi, ABZAR can mean "tool," “instrument,” or "implement" and is often associated with writing supplies (paper, ink, pens, etc.)

Many Persian names consist of a stem (sometimes itself a name) followed by the letter I. Examples: Velayeti, Zahrai, Shariati, etc. This common suffix creates an attributive adjective. You can try out this parlor game: Start with a name of a city, a fruit, or a simple concept. Add the letter I at the end, and you have an adjective. Example:

The city of Tehran -- Tehrani (“Tehranian”)

The name "Habeeb ibn Muzahir" -- Habeebi (“devoted to the memory of Habeeb ibn Muzahir”)

etc.

The initial "Al-" in this case simply means "the," as in "Al-Afghani” (“the Afghani”)

Some family names (mostly Arabic, rather than Persian) begin with the word "al", which sounds similar to the definite article "al-", except that the A sound is longer. This “al” means "the family of" or "of the house of." Example: "Al Israeel" (“the house of Israel”). When used with a surname, "al" functions like the French "de," as in "de Maupassant."

Some family names begin with both forms of "al-". Example: "Al Al-Shaykh" ("of the family of the Shaykh").

I hope this sheds enough light on "Al-Abzari".

Fuad
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Fuad Yahya
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Summary of answers provided
na"The Stationery Man"Fuad Yahya
naal-AbzariSerge


  

Answers


3 hrs
al-Abzari


Explanation:
Arabic Personal Names from the Futuwwah
by Mustapha al-Muhaddith ibn al-Saqaat

The following lists contain first names and surnames that I have seen in the Isnad to al-Sulami's Futuwwah, composed before the early 11th century (Futuwwah or The Book of Sufi Chivalry, Muhamed ibn al-Husayn al-Sulami, trans. Shaykh Tosun Bayrak al-Jerrahi al-Halveti, pub. Inner Traditions International Inc., NY 1983). The transliteration system is Shaykh al-Halveti's and does not distinguish between certain English consonants and Arabic consonants which have no English equivalent. I have made no attempt to translate the surnames. Al- is "the", ibn is "son of", abu is "father of".

Surnames
al-Abzari

http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mustapha/futuwwah.html

Hope it can help you.
Best Regards,
Serge





Serge

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
AhmedAMS
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11 hrs
"The Stationery Man"


Explanation:
This surname is Persian, not Arabic.

In Farsi, ABZAR can mean "tool," “instrument,” or "implement" and is often associated with writing supplies (paper, ink, pens, etc.)

Many Persian names consist of a stem (sometimes itself a name) followed by the letter I. Examples: Velayeti, Zahrai, Shariati, etc. This common suffix creates an attributive adjective. You can try out this parlor game: Start with a name of a city, a fruit, or a simple concept. Add the letter I at the end, and you have an adjective. Example:

The city of Tehran -- Tehrani (“Tehranian”)

The name "Habeeb ibn Muzahir" -- Habeebi (“devoted to the memory of Habeeb ibn Muzahir”)

etc.

The initial "Al-" in this case simply means "the," as in "Al-Afghani” (“the Afghani”)

Some family names (mostly Arabic, rather than Persian) begin with the word "al", which sounds similar to the definite article "al-", except that the A sound is longer. This “al” means "the family of" or "of the house of." Example: "Al Israeel" (“the house of Israel”). When used with a surname, "al" functions like the French "de," as in "de Maupassant."

Some family names begin with both forms of "al-". Example: "Al Al-Shaykh" ("of the family of the Shaykh").

I hope this sheds enough light on "Al-Abzari".

Fuad


    Courtesy of my Iranian friend Tala Faiz, a volunteer at the Children Art Project
    at M.D.Anderson Cancer Center, Houston
Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2542
Grading comment
Thank You very much
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