KudoZ home » Arabic to English » Other

بكاش أو هجاص:BAKKASH OR HAGGAS

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
04:21 Sep 16, 2001
Arabic to English translations [PRO]
Arabic term or phrase: بكاش أو هجاص:BAKKASH OR HAGGAS
WHEN YOU DESCRIBE SOMEONE IN THE EGYPTIAN COLLOQUIAL ARABIC. I NEED IT BOTH IN STANDARD AND SLANG ENGLISH.
DINA MOHAMED
Local time: 01:37
Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5reply to fuadMona Helal
5Thank you DinaMona Helal
4 +1braggart, braggadocio, blowhard, blower, hot air merchantFuad Yahya
5Bakkash = Flatterer & Haggas = ExaggeratorMona Helal
4another thoughtMona Helal
3 +1Additional shades of meaningFuad Yahya
4BAKKASH OR HAGGAS
Magdy Zaky
4suck up, exaggerate
Mark Oxford


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
suck up, exaggerate


Explanation:
You can look at it in the Oxford Concise Dictionary.


    Reference: http://www.expage.com/translationservices
Mark Oxford
United States
Local time: 15:37
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Bakkash = Flatterer & Haggas = Exaggerator


Explanation:
Bakkash is: a flatterer or suck up.

Haggash is: someone who overstates or overdoes or magnifies/amplifies something= an exaggerator.

HTH

Mona Helal
Local time: 10:37
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 553
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
BAKKASH OR HAGGAS


Explanation:
Bakkash means Toady
Haggas means Sycophant
Both are synonymous of same meaning.
Magdy Zaky

Magdy Zaky
Local time: 01:37
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic
PRO pts in pair: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Additional shades of meaning


Explanation:
Not being an Egyptian, I have refrained from voicing any opinion on this question, because I don’t have any. My proper place is to watch and learn from the experts.

I decided to respond because the answers so far show general consensus on a surprisingly narrow definition of BAKKASH and HAGGAS. I was hoping to see a broader spectrum of usage, and some reflection on the finer shades of meaning.

Among the nuances not yet discussed, and which I naturally know only second-hand, through my Egyptian associates, are the following:

BAKKASH: In addition to the sense of flattery, the word is used in the sense of lying for the sake of self-aggrandizement. This can involve exaggeration or half-truths, but can also involve telling lies. So a BAKKASH can mean a self-promoter who toots his own horn for social gain. In that sense, its purpose is similar to that of flattery, except that a flatterer usually praises others, albeit insincerely, while a BAKKASH usually praises himself.

HAGGAS: In addition to the sense of exaggeration, the word is used in the sense of fooling or goofing around, either verbally or physically. It can refer to deceptive or misleading statements, whether by way of exaggeration or outright fabrication, but can also refer to childish or nonsensical behavior, verbal or otherwise. The expression BALASH HAGS is similar to the expression BALASH LI’B ‘IYAL
بلاش لعب عيال

In fact, Hans Wehr defines HAGS as “mischief, nuisance, or horseplay.” Of course, Hans Wehr’s work is dated, if not outdated, but it should at least inspire deeper delving and perhaps richer discovery.

As I said, I have no opinion on this matter, one way or the other. I am sure the answers presented so far are correct, but I wish to see more varied input from our Egyptian colleagues, confirming, contradicting, or just commenting on this variety of meanings.

Fuad


Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2542

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  AhmedAMS
18 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

18 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
reply to fuad


Explanation:
Fuad stated the following:
"while a BAKKASH usually praises himself."
This is not true. Bakkash is usually a praiser/flatterer of others so as to gain whatever ends he wants to gain. It doesn't usually refer to praising onself. This word therefore, is not used in the sense of lying for the sake of self-aggrandizement. It is for the aggrandisement of others like I said before.

As for HAGGAS: It, like I mentioned in my posting, refers to exaggeration mainly without necessarily being used fooling or goofing around, either verbally or physically.
I agree that it can refer to deceptive or misleading statements, whether by way of exaggeration or outright fabrication, but I don't agree that it can refer to childish or nonsensical behavior, verbal or otherwise.

In doing so the Haggas is trying to draw the attention to himself or trying to gain an audiance.

Not always do I, for one, have the luxury of time to expand on the details I give on this forum. Please forgive me.

HTH

Mona Helal
Local time: 10:37
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 553
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 20 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
another thought


Explanation:
Would it be safe to assume that هجص'Hags', from which هجاص'Haggas' is derived, is an Egyptianised pronunciation/derivation of the English word 'Hoax'?

The two words are certainly close in meaning.

Mona

Mona Helal
Local time: 10:37
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 553
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Thank you Dina


Explanation:
I think maybe I have been away from Egypt longer than I thought. What I mentioned is what I understood about its meaning when I was living there permanently 30 years ago. Could the meaning have changed meanwhile? Or maybe I have misunderstood it all along, I don't know. I have consulted recently with another Egyptian and he confirmed what you said in your added note. So the Bakkash would be lying for the sake of the aggrandisement of self and others.
There's another Egyptian adjective that comes to mind in this regard and that is: Ma'aar معّـار coming from Ma'r معر. This again is some form of a liar.
I won't be wrong if I say that it is used synonmously with Bakkash and Haggas. What do you think?

Mona

Mona Helal
Local time: 10:37
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 553
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
braggart, braggadocio, blowhard, blower, hot air merchant


Explanation:
Now that we seem to be coming to an agreement on BAKKASH, I would like to go back to your original question, where you asked for suggestions of equivalent terms in English, both standard and slang.

The terms I am suggesting are from Roget's II, The New Thesaurus, Third Edition.

"Braggart" is a standard pejorative term, derived from "bragger" (one who brags).

"Braggadocio" is another term whose very sound evokes the intended meaning of boastfulness and vainglory.

"Blowhard" is considered "informal," while "blower" is considered "slang."

"Hot air merchant" is just a descriptive phrase.

All of these terms convey the sense of exaggerated self-praise and ostentatious vainness, in a pitiable way. If this is the sense that is conveyed by BAKKASH, then any of these terms should suffice.

These terms, however, do not convey the sense of willful, calculating social climbing, such as smoothing one's way along the corporate ladder by self-promotion and positive deception. If this is an essential element in BAKKASH, then these terms would fall short.

In that case, the term that would come close is "weasel," a noun commonly used in the US for someone who lies smoothly and adroitly with selfish intent.

Fuad


    Roget's Thesaurus
    American Heritage Dictionary
Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2542

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  AhmedAMS
201 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search