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Tirs, context - soil science

English translation: Tirs

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Arabic term or phrase:Tirs, context - soil science
English translation:Tirs
Entered by: Fuad Yahya
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15:59 Mar 18, 2001
Arabic to English translations [PRO]
Science
Arabic term or phrase: Tirs, context - soil science
As for its pedology, there exist two types of soil:
1. "Tirs" soil in the regions of Hadd D'draa, Korimat and Meskala;

Thank you
Tamara Salvio
United States
Local time: 17:23
Tirs
Explanation:
Forgive me for being confused about the translation direction, i.e., from which language to which? The text you provided is in English, so are you translating it into Arabic, or are you translating it into a third language, like French?

The terms used, properly placed in quotes, seem to refer to local nomenclature, followed by some technical scientific description. As in the case of your earlier question, “translating” these local appellations would efface the writer’s purpose, which appears to be keen on conveying these terms as used in their local setting. Replacing these terms with some foreign equivalents would be like translating “falafil,” “hummus bittahina,” or “shish kebob.”

This may not be much help, but if I am missing something here, perhaps you can clarify what you are trying to accomplish a little bit more, and I will try again.

Fuad
Selected response from:

Fuad Yahya
Grading comment
Thank you Fuad. Sorry about the confusion, I am translating a document from French to English (my accredited language pair). The document was written by a native Moroccan and contains a great deal of history of Morocco and the author's native province. Arabic terms are often left untranslated, possibly for emphasis as you indicate, but in some cases because the same word is well understood in both French and English. Where a word is not easily understood in English, I attempt to get clarification which I add in brackets. I sometimes post in the original French, sometimes in English translation, wherever I think I have the chance for the greatest number of responses.

Shukren Jazeelen,
avenir


4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naTirsJeremias MARSCHALIK
naTirsFuad Yahya


  

Answers


5 hrs
Tirs


Explanation:
Forgive me for being confused about the translation direction, i.e., from which language to which? The text you provided is in English, so are you translating it into Arabic, or are you translating it into a third language, like French?

The terms used, properly placed in quotes, seem to refer to local nomenclature, followed by some technical scientific description. As in the case of your earlier question, “translating” these local appellations would efface the writer’s purpose, which appears to be keen on conveying these terms as used in their local setting. Replacing these terms with some foreign equivalents would be like translating “falafil,” “hummus bittahina,” or “shish kebob.”

This may not be much help, but if I am missing something here, perhaps you can clarify what you are trying to accomplish a little bit more, and I will try again.

Fuad


Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2542
Grading comment
Thank you Fuad. Sorry about the confusion, I am translating a document from French to English (my accredited language pair). The document was written by a native Moroccan and contains a great deal of history of Morocco and the author's native province. Arabic terms are often left untranslated, possibly for emphasis as you indicate, but in some cases because the same word is well understood in both French and English. Where a word is not easily understood in English, I attempt to get clarification which I add in brackets. I sometimes post in the original French, sometimes in English translation, wherever I think I have the chance for the greatest number of responses.

Shukren Jazeelen,
avenir


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
AhmedAMS
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1 day 7 hrs
Tirs


Explanation:
Well, if the author wrote it in Arabic (or in whatever language other than the language of the main text), Fuad is right in suggesting that it should be left as it is: anyways, it's already hermetic! A full translation, or the addition of a didactic periphrase, should be used only when translating a monolingual text. Therefore, nothing to change.
"I met a devejee on my way back from the hastahane" is
"J'ai rencontrژ un dژvژdji en revenant du hastahanژ", that's all!

Jeremias MARSCHALIK
Local time: 02:23
Native speaker of: Native in HebrewHebrew

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
AhmedAMS
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