Cansalada de coll

English translation: jowl bacon

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Catalan term or phrase:Cansalada de coll
English translation:jowl bacon
Entered by: Sheila Hardie

15:51 Nov 3, 2010
Catalan to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Cooking / Culinary / Catalan breakfast menu
Catalan term or phrase: Cansalada de coll
Entrepans calents:
De Salsitxes d’ Aiguafreda amb Pebrot verd i Pa d’espelta 5,00€
De Pepito de Bou de Wagyu, xalota refregida i mostassa dolça amb Focaccia d’herbes 10,00€
De Truita d’all i julivert amb Pa d’olives verdes 4,50€
El nostre Club Sandwich amb Pa de gingebre 6,00€
D’Hamburguesa de vedella, sofregit de ceba i tomàquet, formatge i Pa de sèsam 7,00€
De ****Cansalada del coll****, herbes fresques i rostit de carxofa amb Coca d’oli

UK Eng please. TIA. :)
Kate Major
Spain
Local time: 21:14
jowl bacon
Explanation:
I think this is also called 'tocino de papada' or 'papada' in Spanish and 'guanciale' in Italian.

HTH

Sheila

Guanciale
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


A piece of guanciale being aged.
Guanciale (Italian pronunciation: [ɡwanˈtʃaːle]) is an unsmoked Italian bacon prepared with pig's jowl or cheeks. Its name is derived from guancia, Italian for cheek. Guanciale is similar to the jowl bacon of the United States.
Pork cheek is rubbed with salt, ground black pepper or red pepper and cured for three weeks. Its flavor is stronger than other pork products, such as pancetta, and its texture is more delicate.
Guanciale is traditionally used in dishes like pasta all'amatriciana and spaghetti alla carbonara. It is a delicacy of central Italy, particularly Umbria and Lazio.
Pancetta, a cured Italian bacon which is normally not smoked, can be used as a substitute when guanciale is not available, with slightly varying results.
[edit]

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Note added at 27 minutes (2010-11-03 16:19:16 GMT)
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacon

Jowl bacon is cured and smoked cheeks of pork. See Guanciale.
Selected response from:

Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 21:14
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +2jowl bacon
Sheila Hardie


  

Answers


25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
jowl bacon


Explanation:
I think this is also called 'tocino de papada' or 'papada' in Spanish and 'guanciale' in Italian.

HTH

Sheila

Guanciale
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


A piece of guanciale being aged.
Guanciale (Italian pronunciation: [ɡwanˈtʃaːle]) is an unsmoked Italian bacon prepared with pig's jowl or cheeks. Its name is derived from guancia, Italian for cheek. Guanciale is similar to the jowl bacon of the United States.
Pork cheek is rubbed with salt, ground black pepper or red pepper and cured for three weeks. Its flavor is stronger than other pork products, such as pancetta, and its texture is more delicate.
Guanciale is traditionally used in dishes like pasta all'amatriciana and spaghetti alla carbonara. It is a delicacy of central Italy, particularly Umbria and Lazio.
Pancetta, a cured Italian bacon which is normally not smoked, can be used as a substitute when guanciale is not available, with slightly varying results.
[edit]

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 27 minutes (2010-11-03 16:19:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacon

Jowl bacon is cured and smoked cheeks of pork. See Guanciale.

Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 21:14
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 28
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Berni Armstrong: pork cheeks sounds more appetising (and digestible) though ;-)
1 hr
  -> thanks, Berni - to be honest, I don't like the sound of any of them as I'm a vegetarian :))

agree  Laia Bove Imhoff: yes, pork cheeks sounds better! But I agree with all of the above.
2 hrs
  -> thanks, Laia :-)
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