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flabiol

English translation: Member of flute family. Played with one hand, it introduces the melody for Sardanes, while the other hand plays a small drum

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Catalan term or phrase:flabiol
English translation:Member of flute family. Played with one hand, it introduces the melody for Sardanes, while the other hand plays a small drum
Entered by: Berni Armstrong
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13:42 Nov 22, 2001
Catalan to English translations [Non-PRO]
Catalan term or phrase: flabiol
Hola!

Estic traduïnt una cançó del català a l'anglès i necessito saber la traducció de "flabiol". No sé si és que hi ha diferents tipus de flabiols o diferents maneres d'anomenar-los. L'instrument és molt característic de les Sardanes. He trobat "fipple flute" i flageolet, però curiosament no apareixen al diccionari. Algú em pot ajudar?

Moltíssimes gràcies :-)
Ariadna Castillo González
Hong Kong
Local time: 18:04
fipple flute / recorder
Explanation:
Hola Ariadna,
He trobat molta informació sobre el flabiol. La veritat és que per a mi és una mena de 'recorder' . Al meu col·legi, molts nens tenien 'recorders' - però jo no. De fet, mai no havia sentit parlar de 'fipple flute'!

Bona sort!

Sheila


http://baroque-music.com/wc/info/flute.shtml


recorder. (French flûte à bec; German Blockflöte; Italian flauto diretto; Spanish flauta de pico). Woodwind instrument of ancient lineage, made without reed. Forerunner of the flute, but end-blown through a whistle-mouthpiece. In medieval times, the recorder was known under the Latin name fistula, hence 'fipple-flute'. It had seven finger-holes in front and a thumb-hole behind, and a beak-shaped mouthpiece. The antiquity of the instrument is hard to determine because its playing position is so like that of similar instrument (other whistle types), that contemporary illustrations are of little help. But it has been estimated as being in existence in the 12th century, although the word 'recorder' first appeared in a document in 1388. A recorder tutor was published in Venice, 1535. By the 15th century, there were several sizes of recorder. Praetorius lists 8, i.e. great bass, quint bass, bass, tenor, alto, two soprano, sopranino. Thus, recorder consorts were a common feature of Renaissance music life. The instrument has been widely revived in the 20th century both as an easy instrument for children and as a part of the revival in performing early music on authentic instruments. Modern composers have written for it, e.g. Britten, Arnold Cooke, and Rubbra. The most common size today is the descant (soprano), but there are also sopranino, treble (alto), tenor, and bass.


flageolet. Late 16th century instrument of end-blown flute type, with four finger-holes and two thumb-holes, 'invented' by Sieur de Juvigny of Paris, c. 1581. The name has also been applied to earlier instruments of the end-blown fipple type of pipe. Handel wrote for the true flageolet in Rinaldo.
Also note ... Flageolet notes is a term applied to harmonics on a string instrument, produced by light stopping of the string at natural vibration points, and so called because the resultant high thin sound is said to resemble that of the flageolet.


AQUÍ HI HAN FOTOS:

http://www.deutsches-museum.de/ausstell/dauer/musik/e_musik3...


 Music

Woodwind instruments


* From the transverse flute to the piccolo
* Fipple flutes and flageolets
* Reed instruments


 
Bagpipe (gaita gallega), Spain, ca. 1930
 Roughly speaking, wind instruments can be divided into two groups: woodwind and brass instruments. Woodwind instruments are the flutes, including, given their historical development, the transverse flutes now made of silver, as well as oboes, clarinets, bassoons, the saxophone and bagpipes.

The common feature of the woodwind instruments is that they use a stream of air produced by blowing as the primary source of sound. This stream of air stimulates the column of air inside the instrument, producing natural vibrations. The pitch is altered by changing the length of the air column, using valves operated by keys in the case of the transverse flute or fingerholes on fipple flutes.

----------------------------------------

Fipple flutes and flageolets

Before the cross flute in the 18th century, it was the fipple flute (or recorder) which had been the favorite instrument of wind players. It was the flute per se, whilst the transverse flute was always referred to with the qualifying adjective (flauto traverso, flute traversière, etc.).

 
Fipple flutes from the exhibition display case
 

By 1600, fipple flutes had already been developed into an entire "family" ranging from descant to bass, but underwent no change in their structure from the Middle Ages until about 1650. It was only then that the standard size, the length of the resonance section in relation to the diameter of the fingerholes, became narrower, the holes became more conical and in medium-sized instruments, the body was divided into three sections, with a top, middle and end piece. This added a somewhat sweeter quality to the earlier soft, deep, but rather hollow sound.

The baroque composers wrote chamber music for the fipple flute, among them Georg Philipp Telemann. Johann Sebastian Bach was also still using this instrument in his cantatas and in the Brandenburg Concertos. But after that, the restrained sound of this instrument no longer corresponded to the musical taste of the times and it fell almost entirely out of fashion. It was revived again shortly before 1900, but was soon downgraded to an "inferior" children's instrument, the recorder. It is only very recently, over the past 30-odd years, that the treble recorder in particular has been reinstated as a concert instrument.


AQUÍ HI HAN DIBUIXOS:

http://flabiol.trad.org/subpagines/1instrument.html


EL FLABIOL
L'instrument

És un instrument de vent (de la família de les flautes) fet de fusta o de canya, d'uns 20 ò 25 cm de llargada. Acostuma a tenir cinc forats a sobre i tres a sota. Te la particularitat de que està pensat per a ser tocat amb una sola ma usant-hi els cinc dits. Antigament eren d'una sola peça i amb el cap pla (sense bec).


http://www.terra.es/personal/cescsans/Catala/Flabiol.htm
Selected response from:

Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 11:04
Grading comment
He optat per "piccolo" que era una altra alternativa que jo tenia i que he confirmat amb les referències que m'has proporcionat. Moltíssimes gràcies, Sheila! Ariadna :-)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5flabiol revisitedHeather Hayes
5flabiolHeather Hayes
4 +1fipple flute / recorder
Sheila Hardie


  

Answers


21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
fipple flute / recorder


Explanation:
Hola Ariadna,
He trobat molta informació sobre el flabiol. La veritat és que per a mi és una mena de 'recorder' . Al meu col·legi, molts nens tenien 'recorders' - però jo no. De fet, mai no havia sentit parlar de 'fipple flute'!

Bona sort!

Sheila


http://baroque-music.com/wc/info/flute.shtml


recorder. (French flûte à bec; German Blockflöte; Italian flauto diretto; Spanish flauta de pico). Woodwind instrument of ancient lineage, made without reed. Forerunner of the flute, but end-blown through a whistle-mouthpiece. In medieval times, the recorder was known under the Latin name fistula, hence 'fipple-flute'. It had seven finger-holes in front and a thumb-hole behind, and a beak-shaped mouthpiece. The antiquity of the instrument is hard to determine because its playing position is so like that of similar instrument (other whistle types), that contemporary illustrations are of little help. But it has been estimated as being in existence in the 12th century, although the word 'recorder' first appeared in a document in 1388. A recorder tutor was published in Venice, 1535. By the 15th century, there were several sizes of recorder. Praetorius lists 8, i.e. great bass, quint bass, bass, tenor, alto, two soprano, sopranino. Thus, recorder consorts were a common feature of Renaissance music life. The instrument has been widely revived in the 20th century both as an easy instrument for children and as a part of the revival in performing early music on authentic instruments. Modern composers have written for it, e.g. Britten, Arnold Cooke, and Rubbra. The most common size today is the descant (soprano), but there are also sopranino, treble (alto), tenor, and bass.


flageolet. Late 16th century instrument of end-blown flute type, with four finger-holes and two thumb-holes, 'invented' by Sieur de Juvigny of Paris, c. 1581. The name has also been applied to earlier instruments of the end-blown fipple type of pipe. Handel wrote for the true flageolet in Rinaldo.
Also note ... Flageolet notes is a term applied to harmonics on a string instrument, produced by light stopping of the string at natural vibration points, and so called because the resultant high thin sound is said to resemble that of the flageolet.


AQUÍ HI HAN FOTOS:

http://www.deutsches-museum.de/ausstell/dauer/musik/e_musik3...


 Music

Woodwind instruments


* From the transverse flute to the piccolo
* Fipple flutes and flageolets
* Reed instruments


 
Bagpipe (gaita gallega), Spain, ca. 1930
 Roughly speaking, wind instruments can be divided into two groups: woodwind and brass instruments. Woodwind instruments are the flutes, including, given their historical development, the transverse flutes now made of silver, as well as oboes, clarinets, bassoons, the saxophone and bagpipes.

The common feature of the woodwind instruments is that they use a stream of air produced by blowing as the primary source of sound. This stream of air stimulates the column of air inside the instrument, producing natural vibrations. The pitch is altered by changing the length of the air column, using valves operated by keys in the case of the transverse flute or fingerholes on fipple flutes.

----------------------------------------

Fipple flutes and flageolets

Before the cross flute in the 18th century, it was the fipple flute (or recorder) which had been the favorite instrument of wind players. It was the flute per se, whilst the transverse flute was always referred to with the qualifying adjective (flauto traverso, flute traversière, etc.).

 
Fipple flutes from the exhibition display case
 

By 1600, fipple flutes had already been developed into an entire "family" ranging from descant to bass, but underwent no change in their structure from the Middle Ages until about 1650. It was only then that the standard size, the length of the resonance section in relation to the diameter of the fingerholes, became narrower, the holes became more conical and in medium-sized instruments, the body was divided into three sections, with a top, middle and end piece. This added a somewhat sweeter quality to the earlier soft, deep, but rather hollow sound.

The baroque composers wrote chamber music for the fipple flute, among them Georg Philipp Telemann. Johann Sebastian Bach was also still using this instrument in his cantatas and in the Brandenburg Concertos. But after that, the restrained sound of this instrument no longer corresponded to the musical taste of the times and it fell almost entirely out of fashion. It was revived again shortly before 1900, but was soon downgraded to an "inferior" children's instrument, the recorder. It is only very recently, over the past 30-odd years, that the treble recorder in particular has been reinstated as a concert instrument.


AQUÍ HI HAN DIBUIXOS:

http://flabiol.trad.org/subpagines/1instrument.html


EL FLABIOL
L'instrument

És un instrument de vent (de la família de les flautes) fet de fusta o de canya, d'uns 20 ò 25 cm de llargada. Acostuma a tenir cinc forats a sobre i tres a sota. Te la particularitat de que està pensat per a ser tocat amb una sola ma usant-hi els cinc dits. Antigament eren d'una sola peça i amb el cap pla (sense bec).


http://www.terra.es/personal/cescsans/Catala/Flabiol.htm


Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 11:04
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 769
Grading comment
He optat per "piccolo" que era una altra alternativa que jo tenia i que he confirmat amb les referències que m'has proporcionat. Moltíssimes gràcies, Sheila! Ariadna :-)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  flaviofbg: WONDERFUL :)
7 mins
  -> moltes gràcies, Flavio:)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

13 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
flabiol


Explanation:
This should not be translated, as no equivalent term exists in English.
I would say "flabiol" in italics, and then put a definition in parentheses (a small flageolet designed to be played with one hand, generally used to accompany traditional and folk-dances.)


    I'm a musician and play folk music professionally
    been there, done that :-)
Heather Hayes
PRO pts in pair: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

13 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
flabiol revisited


Explanation:
I dpn't care about the kudos pints, etc.
It's just that "fipple flute" is a family of flutes such as recorders, flageolets and whistles, all opf which have a little window-like slit cut or incoporated into them nearby the mouthpice, thereby eliminating the need for the player to develop an "embouchure" (lip position or muscular technique), such as would ne necessary with trasnverse flutes.

Heather Hayes
PRO pts in pair: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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