KudoZ home » Chinese to English » Art/Literary

拍 写 真

English translation: "They just left for Hainan for a (special) photo shoot for (a ) female movie star(s)."

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Chinese term or phrase:拍 写 真
English translation: "They just left for Hainan for a (special) photo shoot for (a ) female movie star(s)."
Entered by: Smartrans He
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

16:19 Nov 20, 2000
Chinese to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
Chinese term or phrase: 拍 写 真
“他 们 正 去 海 南 为 女 名 星 拍 一 套 写 真"

The term "xiezhen" entered Chinese sometime ago from Japanese for "photo" (shashin), but as you no doubt know, it now refers to a collection of still shots in which the Asian starlette in question -- rarely over 25 -- is caught in various alluring, even erotic, poses. Any ideas?
liberation
"They just left for Hainan for a (special) photo shoot for (a ) female movie star(s)."
Explanation:
In China, no one gives "explicit" answers. They are always elusive, if not ambiguous. If this were a statement to a question, the answer should sound natural. By adding "special", it would imply some irregular activities. Saying outright that it is "erotic" or "sexy" photo shoot does not sound natural in a Chinese conversation .

Would the answer be for a (singular) movie star, or for female movie stars (plural)? The latter would make sense if such special photo shoots were par for the course.

Note that "zheng" was translated.
Selected response from:

Elizabeth Tu
United States
Local time: 22:17
Grading comment
Elizabeth, I agree that a "photo shoot" does capture 95% of the meaning of the original sentence, and I find your explanation valid. Timothy and Echo, I do appreciate your weighing in here and giving me your views, which makes it so much easier for me to decide on a final version with the confidence I "understand" the background of a phrase. But I must admit: I am still curious how the final product of a "photo shoot" -- called a "xiezhen" in HK, Taiwan and Japan, and often sold on newsstands as a 10-25 page special publication -- is called in English. If you have an idea, do let me know! Again, many thanks to all of you, and I do hope I get the chance to help each of you out soonest. brucehumes@worldnet.att.net
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
natake photeEcho Chan
na"They just left for Hainan for a (special) photo shoot for (a ) female movie star(s)."
Elizabeth Tu
naTake seductive and alluring shots.Timothy Murton


  

Answers


8 hrs
Take seductive and alluring shots.


Explanation:
The sentence that you use for context could be translated something like:

"They went straight to Hainan to take some seductive and alluring shots of the young female starlet."

"Xiezhen" really refers to portraits. However, for something more contemporary, rather than the more antiquated "portraits", I would suggest using the word "shots". Using the word "pictures" is also fine I think. Both mean much the same, and are far more contemporary and likely to be used.

Timothy Murton
Local time: 13:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 29
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 hrs
"They just left for Hainan for a (special) photo shoot for (a ) female movie star(s)."


Explanation:
In China, no one gives "explicit" answers. They are always elusive, if not ambiguous. If this were a statement to a question, the answer should sound natural. By adding "special", it would imply some irregular activities. Saying outright that it is "erotic" or "sexy" photo shoot does not sound natural in a Chinese conversation .

Would the answer be for a (singular) movie star, or for female movie stars (plural)? The latter would make sense if such special photo shoots were par for the course.

Note that "zheng" was translated.


    Reference: http://etutu@aol.com
Elizabeth Tu
United States
Local time: 22:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in ChineseChinese
PRO pts in pair: 8
Grading comment
Elizabeth, I agree that a "photo shoot" does capture 95% of the meaning of the original sentence, and I find your explanation valid. Timothy and Echo, I do appreciate your weighing in here and giving me your views, which makes it so much easier for me to decide on a final version with the confidence I "understand" the background of a phrase. But I must admit: I am still curious how the final product of a "photo shoot" -- called a "xiezhen" in HK, Taiwan and Japan, and often sold on newsstands as a 10-25 page special publication -- is called in English. If you have an idea, do let me know! Again, many thanks to all of you, and I do hope I get the chance to help each of you out soonest. brucehumes@worldnet.att.net
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 days
take phote


Explanation:
In Hong Kong, this term has become a neutral term popularly used to describe taking photos. The suggestions of other two could also be appropriate. The choice depends on the area / country or situation mentioned in the orginal text.

Echo Chan
Hong Kong
Local time: 11:17
PRO pts in pair: 8
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search