Ha' en fortsat god dag

English translation: Enjoy the rest of your day

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09:35 Oct 26, 2005
Danish to English translations [PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
Danish term or phrase: Ha' en fortsat god dag
How does this differ from 'ha en god dag'? Is there a close match in English?
logan
English translation:Enjoy the rest of your day
Explanation:
While not common in English, I could imagine saying this in a business context, i.e., on the phone or in an e-mail to a client.

Susanne is absolutely right in her comment. Both terms have come about from the influence of American business culture and are becoming increasingly popular. In that sense, Alasdair, you may be right about the younger generation using it more often.
Selected response from:

Dana Sackett Lössl
Denmark
Local time: 23:50
Grading comment
Thanks, this is perfect!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +11Enjoy the rest of your day
Dana Sackett Lössl
4 +3not used in the UK, US "have a nice day"
Terence Ajbro
3 +1Keep on trucking
Eliza-Anna
3Have a really good day now!
xxxmuitoprazer


Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Have a really good day now!


Explanation:
k

xxxmuitoprazer
Local time: 22:50
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Terence Ajbro: I have never heard this said in the UK and I visit home at least once a year. Brummies have just been voted as being the "rudest in the UK" which might explain this!
2 mins
  -> why?maybe you're being too sensitive!
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
not used in the UK, US "have a nice day"


Explanation:
In English you would probably say the same thing. I think it is more normal in the US to say "have a nice day". We Brits tend to be more introvert and can get away with saying absolutely nothing or ignoring the person (try shopping in Birmingham).

Terence Ajbro
Sweden
Local time: 23:50
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 11

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  aic: It is really one of my favourite "hate-phrases". Originally it's a translation of "have a nice day" and then used as Susanne points out
33 mins
  -> I hate it too

agree  Anna Haxen: I generally prefer rewriting/rephrasing to making things up that don't exist in the target language, but, of course, that isn't always possible.
2 hrs

agree  Michele Fauble
20 hrs
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42 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Keep on trucking


Explanation:
This is very informal and would be idiomatically equivalent to "fortsat god dag" etc. Another idiomic equivalent would of course be "keep your chin" up, depending on the context.

People have said "forsat god dag" to me in shops in Denmark, in situations that were relatively formal - and the exact equivalent is just not used in UK English. I wonder if "cheerio" could lead us on to something more equivalent?

I agree with much of what the others have said and I hope my suggestions help.

Eliza-Anna
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:50
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christine Andersen: It is difficult to find something when you don't know how the person will spend the rest of the day. The formal good afternoon, good evening etc. as the day wore on are hopelessly outdated used as 'goodbye', but the meaning was about the same!
21 hrs
  -> Thanks
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52 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +11
Enjoy the rest of your day


Explanation:
While not common in English, I could imagine saying this in a business context, i.e., on the phone or in an e-mail to a client.

Susanne is absolutely right in her comment. Both terms have come about from the influence of American business culture and are becoming increasingly popular. In that sense, Alasdair, you may be right about the younger generation using it more often.

Dana Sackett Lössl
Denmark
Local time: 23:50
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 11
Grading comment
Thanks, this is perfect!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Susanne Rosenberg: Not sure about the English expression, but 'enjoy the rest of your vacation' sounds good for 'fortsat god ferie'. Disagree about the 2nd part - my grandma used the expression all the time, she died 15 years ago & was not influenced by American culture!
12 mins
  -> Right again, Susanne. It is "ha en god dag" that is the newer expression.

neutral  Terence Ajbro: prefer the Spanish "vaya con Dios"
13 mins
  -> Maybe in some contexts, Terence. But a telephone salesperson probably wouldn't say that.

agree  Mads Grøftehauge: You sum it up quite nicely. A shame that Susanne didn't give a formal answer, though.
14 mins
  -> I agree fully.

agree  xxxlone
1 hr
  -> Tak!

agree  Eliza-Anna: I tend to agree as well
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Liz!

agree  Anna Haxen: If it is absolutely necessary to distinguish between "god dag" and "fortsat god dag", this is the best solution.
1 hr
  -> Tak!

agree  Suzanne Blangsted
2 hrs
  -> Tak!

agree  Dan Schioenning Larsen: If you MUST differentiate this is the best way - which is also much less annoying than the Danish version. In Danish it sounds as if the person saying it knows how your day has been until now. Which they most of the time don't(!)... ah well...
3 hrs
  -> Tak, Dan

agree  Pernille Chapman: If this is to be used e.g. at the end of an email. Many of my British contacts use e.g. 'Enjoy the rest of your evening' (when I'm working late!) For spoken language, I like Liz' suggestion of 'Cheerio'.
4 hrs
  -> Hej, Pernille!

agree  Bente Sorensen: A very common expression in Australia - indicating that part of the day has already gone
5 hrs
  -> Mange tak

agree  xxxmuitoprazer
1 day 23 hrs

agree  bendksu: agree with aic....hate phrase. but translated well.
641 days
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