takkenrillen

English translation: dead hedge

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Dutch term or phrase:takkenril
English translation:dead hedge
Entered by: Frank Poppelaars

18:07 Apr 8, 2009
Dutch to English translations [PRO]
Science - Biology (-tech,-chem,micro-)
Dutch term or phrase: takkenrillen
- "Aanleg takkenrillen en houtsnipperpaden;"

Er wordt een aantal omvormingsmaatregelen van een landgoed genoemd; dit is er een van.

Ik kan hier echt nergens een vertaling voor vinden. Ideeën? Bedankt.
Frank Poppelaars
Netherlands
Local time: 06:38
dead hedge
Explanation:
-> "Dead Hedging
Dead hedging involves using some of the coppice material for making a barrier around the cut coupe. This technique has the advantage of using material from within the wood, much of which would otherwise have to be burnt. It is fairly labour intensive, so is very suitable for volunteer projects. Various different techniques are used, according to the labour and material available, and personal preference. The branching tops left after the coppice poles have been trimmed can be used, as well as unwanted scrub, brashings, rhododendron and other bushy material."
http://handbooks.btcv.org.uk/handbooks/content/section/3759

-> "Dead hedges, that is interwoven poles or brushy cuttings stuck in the ground, apparently were in use before Domesday as suggested by Anglo-Saxon manorial documents. Dead hedges are known to have been built to fence in deer from the start of the Tudor period (Pollard, Hooper and Moore, 1974). The dead hedge was the ancestor of the barbed wire fence..."
http://handbooks.btcv.org.uk/handbooks/content/chapter/65

-> "The simplest (and least skilled) form of dead hedge involves hammering in a row of upright stakes. ... The stakes are spaced two or three feet apart in a row, and then a second parallel row is hammered in two or three feet behind the first. A few pieces of supple growth such as ash or hazel are woven through the stakes to create rough sides, ... Now you have two very rough hurdles, and into the space between them you can drop felled or rotting timber, hedge cuttings, and any other twiggy or woody garden refuse that you don't want to shred for the compost bin"
http://hedgewizardsdiary.blogspot.com/2008/01/making-dead-he...

And I particularly like this one:
-> "The Dead Hedge – for crooked and dense branches

You soon learn that very few branches are actually straight or even straightish and therefore useful for wattling, but if you’ve got a mass of crooked and dense material you can make a so called dead hedge instead. This takes up slightly more space but making one is just as simple. Decide how tall you want your dead hedge and bash two lines of appropriately sized straight thick stakes in to the ground with the mallet (three to four year old branches will probably do it) - one foot apart at fairly regular but alternate intervals"
http://allanshepherd.com/2008/04/02/the-low-carbon-garden-ma...
Selected response from:

Chris Hopley
Netherlands
Local time: 06:38
Grading comment
Chris, you've put in quite the effort again, and your answer+explanation is excellent. Thank you very much; I would never have figured it out.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +1dead hedge
Chris Hopley
2brushwood bunds
Max Nuijens


  

Answers


36 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
brushwood bunds


Explanation:
My best guess is brushwood bund, although bunds are usually not entirely made of wood/branches/slash brushwood/ etc. Variations are possible.

"The threat of invasion from France was ever present during the first half of the 19th century; this gave rise to the volunteer movement of 1859, when the Newbury district contributed a company to the Berkshire county battalion. It was probably at this time that the firing ranges known as The Butts were constructed on Greenham Common. Some thirty feet high, they were situated across the road from the Volunteer Inn (originally called the Rifle Volunteer). There were flags and targets, with a brushwood and timber bund behind the targets. The ranges were between two and three hundred yards, which soon became inadequate as rifles improved."
http://www.greenham-common.org.uk/ixbin/hixclient.exe?a=quer...


Hoopgevend alternatief bij bosbeheer

Een takkenril of takkenwal is een langgerekte hoop van takken, welke bij dunning of snoei vrijkomen. Takkenrillen bieden nestel-, schuil- en voedselplekken voor vogels (winterkoning, heggenmus) en kleine zoogdieren (egel, spitsmuizen, wezel). Bovendien kan een takkenril door de juiste ligging ten opzichte van paden of holes dekking bieden aan schuwe bosfauna. Ook worden rillen gebruikt om recreanten te weren uit kwetsbare biotopen.
http://www.ngf.nl/page.asp?id=1763



Landbouw en Voedselverwerking
NL: ril EN: trash bund
Definitie: (Engels) a windrow of slash brushwood,etc.made along the contour between patches of cultivation or planted stock in order to prevent erosion on slopes
http://www.mijnwoordenboek.nl/vertalen.php?des=EN&src=NL&woo...


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 47 mins (2009-04-08 18:54:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

One could say "bund wall", when it regards a large and high structure intended as a fence.

When it is a thinner thatchwork of thin branches, one could say "brushwood thatch". Google this term with images for picures that make clear what this is. But this may only function as a cover, and is not a ril, which consitst of a frame of stakes which is filled up by thatched/braided branches.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 hrs (2009-04-09 07:56:23 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It is puzzling why it is so difficult to dig up bund examples that are made from thatched wood materials. Perhaps they are rare in the British landscape, where historically stone bunds and hedges occur/function as delineations or fences. Bund and ril, however little used in dayly life, do indicate the same thing; it's just that 'houtril' has enjoyed a recent revival in the Netherlands as a natural and environmentally friendly park or garden element.

Max Nuijens
Belarus
Local time: 07:38
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch
PRO pts in category: 8
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you Max. I think brushwood bunds could be the best translation, but on the other hand it's not very promising google gives only 8 hits. Does anyone agree with this answer?

Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
dead hedge


Explanation:
-> "Dead Hedging
Dead hedging involves using some of the coppice material for making a barrier around the cut coupe. This technique has the advantage of using material from within the wood, much of which would otherwise have to be burnt. It is fairly labour intensive, so is very suitable for volunteer projects. Various different techniques are used, according to the labour and material available, and personal preference. The branching tops left after the coppice poles have been trimmed can be used, as well as unwanted scrub, brashings, rhododendron and other bushy material."
http://handbooks.btcv.org.uk/handbooks/content/section/3759

-> "Dead hedges, that is interwoven poles or brushy cuttings stuck in the ground, apparently were in use before Domesday as suggested by Anglo-Saxon manorial documents. Dead hedges are known to have been built to fence in deer from the start of the Tudor period (Pollard, Hooper and Moore, 1974). The dead hedge was the ancestor of the barbed wire fence..."
http://handbooks.btcv.org.uk/handbooks/content/chapter/65

-> "The simplest (and least skilled) form of dead hedge involves hammering in a row of upright stakes. ... The stakes are spaced two or three feet apart in a row, and then a second parallel row is hammered in two or three feet behind the first. A few pieces of supple growth such as ash or hazel are woven through the stakes to create rough sides, ... Now you have two very rough hurdles, and into the space between them you can drop felled or rotting timber, hedge cuttings, and any other twiggy or woody garden refuse that you don't want to shred for the compost bin"
http://hedgewizardsdiary.blogspot.com/2008/01/making-dead-he...

And I particularly like this one:
-> "The Dead Hedge – for crooked and dense branches

You soon learn that very few branches are actually straight or even straightish and therefore useful for wattling, but if you’ve got a mass of crooked and dense material you can make a so called dead hedge instead. This takes up slightly more space but making one is just as simple. Decide how tall you want your dead hedge and bash two lines of appropriately sized straight thick stakes in to the ground with the mallet (three to four year old branches will probably do it) - one foot apart at fairly regular but alternate intervals"
http://allanshepherd.com/2008/04/02/the-low-carbon-garden-ma...

Chris Hopley
Netherlands
Local time: 06:38
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
Chris, you've put in quite the effort again, and your answer+explanation is excellent. Thank you very much; I would never have figured it out.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Max Nuijens: Chris, this is brilliant and I can only agree.
54 mins
  -> cheers!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



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