Laat de leiding verder van druk.

English translation: release the line pressure further; further release the line pressure

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Dutch term or phrase:laat de leiding verder van druk
English translation:release the line pressure further; further release the line pressure
Entered by: Jack den Haan

21:15 Oct 10, 2012
Dutch to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Chemistry; Chem Sci/Eng / Chemical plant piping system testing
Dutch term or phrase: Laat de leiding verder van druk.
There have been a series of purges, pressurizations, and de-pressuirizations in the piping system.
I think this means "Further release the pressure in the line."
TechLawDC
United States
release line pressure further; further release line pressure
Explanation:
One of these options I would say, depending on context. If the line is not completely depressurised, the first would be applicable. The second option is just as about as vague on the meaning of 'verder' as the source text itself. If 'verder' relates to operational sequence and not to pressure (which implies making the line completely pressure-free), you could add a comma to make that clearer: "Further, release line pressure". If the document is a patent application, the second option (without a comma) would cover the source better than the first, since it conveys the same double meaning.

PS: By the way, in my opinion this is not kosher Northern Dutch ;-)
Selected response from:

Jack den Haan
Netherlands
Local time: 06:16
Grading comment
The client chose this answer, and so did I.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4release line pressure further; further release line pressure
Jack den Haan
3Allow the line to remain pressure-free thereafter.
Carmen Lawrence


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Allow the line to remain pressure-free thereafter.


Explanation:
There may be nicer ways to say this, but in essence, it means to let the line be without pressure after whatever you did before.

Carmen Lawrence
Spain
Local time: 06:16
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Lianne van de Ven: The source quite clearly says to release "more" (or remaining) pressure, rather than to leave it pressure-free (after whatever was done before)//Oh, now I see what you mean. Tineke is right, can be read both ways. But we should only ask/enter 1 word, btw.
1 hr
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
release line pressure further; further release line pressure


Explanation:
One of these options I would say, depending on context. If the line is not completely depressurised, the first would be applicable. The second option is just as about as vague on the meaning of 'verder' as the source text itself. If 'verder' relates to operational sequence and not to pressure (which implies making the line completely pressure-free), you could add a comma to make that clearer: "Further, release line pressure". If the document is a patent application, the second option (without a comma) would cover the source better than the first, since it conveys the same double meaning.

PS: By the way, in my opinion this is not kosher Northern Dutch ;-)

Jack den Haan
Netherlands
Local time: 06:16
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 32
Grading comment
The client chose this answer, and so did I.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



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