Kent Huize

English translation: House of Kent

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Dutch term or phrase:Kent Huize
English translation:House of Kent
Entered by: Evert DELOOF-SYS

23:59 Sep 2, 2003
Dutch to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Names (personal, company)
Dutch term or phrase: Kent Huize
In a text I am translating, we have a cat named Otto. He's the Otto of the House of Kent. And his pet-human, the doctor, lives in an appartement block named Kent Huize, in Amsterdam. At first, I thought that Kent Huize was the exact Dutch translation of the House of Kent. But it seems there's a wordplay here with the verb "kennen" and "huize" is not a typical form of "huis", I think.

What does a native Dutch speaker see here, I wonder. Is there a wordplay, or smth? Should this be taken to mean smth like "[well-] known house" or else? Or does "huize" have other meanings that are not related to "house"?

Any comments will be much appreciated. Thank you in advance.
Özden Arıkan
Germany
Local time: 08:57
House of Kent
Explanation:
Nothing special, really, except that 'Huize' is an older form of 'huis', still used in standard expressions like 'ten huize van' (house, hus,...).

Etymology:

house - O.E. hus "dwelling, shelter, house," from P.Gmc. *khusan (cf. O.N., O.Fris. hus, Du. huis, Ger. Haus), of unknown origin, perhaps connected to the root of hide (v.). In Goth. only in gudhus "temple," lit. "god-house;" the usual word for "house" in Goth. being razn. Meaning "family, including ancestors and descendants, especially if noble" is from c.1000. The legislative sense (1541) is transferred from the building in which the body meets. Meaning "audience in a theater" is from 1921. Zodiac sense is first attested c.1391. The verb meaning "give shelter to" is O.E. husian (cognate with Ger. hausen, Du. huizen). Household is first recorded 1382; for housewife (c.1225) see hussy. To play house is from 1871; as suggestive of "have sex, shack up," 1968. House arrest first attested 1936; housewarming is from 1577; houseboat is 1790. On the house "free" is from 1889.



The only possibility I see right now (if you're really looking for some other meaning) is that it could be some sort of an abbreviated form of 'een gekend huis' 'a well-known house' (simply a well-known house, but also maybe e.g. a brothel) which then later changed into Kent Huize. IMHO, too far-fetched, though. Maybe I'm missing something...
Selected response from:

Evert DELOOF-SYS
Belgium
Local time: 08:57
Grading comment
Thanks to all who answered and commented...
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1House of Kent
Evert DELOOF-SYS
3 +2Huize Kent
Marije Feddema (X)


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Huize Kent


Explanation:
That is what I would rather say, but I can't see any wordplay here. I'm not quite sure about the historical meaning/usage of the word Huize, but it is certainly not only used by well-known Houses. Common people also hang up signs with "Huize Whatever" on their house fronts.

Marije Feddema (X)
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  SIOE DARTANA
11 mins

agree  Kate Hudson
6 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
House of Kent


Explanation:
Nothing special, really, except that 'Huize' is an older form of 'huis', still used in standard expressions like 'ten huize van' (house, hus,...).

Etymology:

house - O.E. hus "dwelling, shelter, house," from P.Gmc. *khusan (cf. O.N., O.Fris. hus, Du. huis, Ger. Haus), of unknown origin, perhaps connected to the root of hide (v.). In Goth. only in gudhus "temple," lit. "god-house;" the usual word for "house" in Goth. being razn. Meaning "family, including ancestors and descendants, especially if noble" is from c.1000. The legislative sense (1541) is transferred from the building in which the body meets. Meaning "audience in a theater" is from 1921. Zodiac sense is first attested c.1391. The verb meaning "give shelter to" is O.E. husian (cognate with Ger. hausen, Du. huizen). Household is first recorded 1382; for housewife (c.1225) see hussy. To play house is from 1871; as suggestive of "have sex, shack up," 1968. House arrest first attested 1936; housewarming is from 1577; houseboat is 1790. On the house "free" is from 1889.



The only possibility I see right now (if you're really looking for some other meaning) is that it could be some sort of an abbreviated form of 'een gekend huis' 'a well-known house' (simply a well-known house, but also maybe e.g. a brothel) which then later changed into Kent Huize. IMHO, too far-fetched, though. Maybe I'm missing something...

Evert DELOOF-SYS
Belgium
Local time: 08:57
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in FlemishFlemish
PRO pts in category: 2
Grading comment
Thanks to all who answered and commented...

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tina Vonhof: I would say 'Kent House' because 'House of Kent' usually indicates a royal family/dynasty. I don't really see any word play here.
17 hrs
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