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opdrachtgever

English translation: the person who assigned the task

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Dutch term or phrase:opdrachtgever
English translation:the person who assigned the task
Entered by: Alexander Schleber
Options:
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- Include in personal glossary

03:15 Feb 24, 2002
Dutch to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial
Dutch term or phrase: opdrachtgever
One of the directors of a company asks the head of a department to write a proposal. The person making the request is now called the 'opdrachtgever'. You can't call him a 'client'. What would be a better word?
Tina Vonhof
Canada
Local time: 22:27
the person who assigned the task
Explanation:
All the answers so far have something about them that does not really fit into your context, in the normal way English is spoken. "assigner" sounds unnatural, as does "superior", which happens to be the case with a director.
"task giver" also sounds like an invention, even if it comes pretty close.

"opdrachtgever" is frequently translated as "principal" (in the sense of originator) but that is perhaps a little too formal, and otherwise, on a commercial level, is a client or customer. I know of no shorter way that sounds correct and transmits the message, than the above.
Selected response from:

Alexander Schleber
Belgium
Local time: 06:27
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone who offered suggestions. But none of them really sound right. 'Internal client' is not an option in this context because in this field (facility management) that means a department within the company to which one supplies services. Even though it's a bit long, I'll go with Alexander's suggestion: 'the person who assigned the job' or 'the person who requested the information'.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5(internal) client
Chris Hopley
5The initiatorxxxjarry
5the person who assigned the task
Alexander Schleber
4instructing party...
edlih_be
4person who commissioned the assignment
Maria Danielson
4 -1The assigner
joeky janusch
4 -1The proposer
Dave Greatrix


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
instructing party...


Explanation:
I know this word has been posted before and, on that occasion, the word 'contactor' was suggested.

Though, I don't think it is suitable in your case.

edlih_be
Local time: 06:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 7

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxjarry: Not a bad solution but would you use this for someone you work with closely?
1 hr
  -> We can only speculate ass to how closely they work together. I think this is a professional and suitable solution.

neutral  Jochen Beheydt: I feel "Contractor" might be adequate, it is definitely neutral enough. The author can elaborate on the specifics further in the proposal.
2 days4 hrs
  -> As I stated, 'contractor' has been used on a previous occasion. However, in this case an instruction has been given to perform a task, therfore 'instructing party' seems reasonable.
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
The proposer


Explanation:
I can not see a reason for not using "the proposer", it's quite common.

Dave Greatrix
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:27
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 1747

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  xxxjarry: Sounds awful I'm afraid David, and in any case, the "proposer" would be the contracting party (i.e. the company) and not this director.
1 hr
  -> point taken on board
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
The assigner


Explanation:
or the one ,who assigns

joeky janusch
Israel
Local time: 07:27
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch
PRO pts in pair: 183

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  xxxjarry: Sounds too much like legal jargon in the context provided by the asker.
1 hr
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
the person who assigned the task


Explanation:
All the answers so far have something about them that does not really fit into your context, in the normal way English is spoken. "assigner" sounds unnatural, as does "superior", which happens to be the case with a director.
"task giver" also sounds like an invention, even if it comes pretty close.

"opdrachtgever" is frequently translated as "principal" (in the sense of originator) but that is perhaps a little too formal, and otherwise, on a commercial level, is a client or customer. I know of no shorter way that sounds correct and transmits the message, than the above.

Alexander Schleber
Belgium
Local time: 06:27
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 818
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone who offered suggestions. But none of them really sound right. 'Internal client' is not an option in this context because in this field (facility management) that means a department within the company to which one supplies services. Even though it's a bit long, I'll go with Alexander's suggestion: 'the person who assigned the job' or 'the person who requested the information'.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxjarry: If you want to avoid such fearful words as principal, requester, instructing party, etc. you might as well be more specific, as in my suggestion.
1 hr
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
The initiator


Explanation:
could also be a possibility.
Having said that, if I were to translate the piece I would have referred to 'the director who requested the proposal' once, and refer to 'the director' in the rest of the piece. "Odrachtgever" is sometimes impossible to translate as such in English without becoming excessively formal or using unnatural language.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-02-24 10:55:11 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Should be: \"I would refer\" of course, and not I would have referred to!

xxxjarry
South Africa
Local time: 06:27
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 3855

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Alexander Schleber: "The initiator of the request" not bad. But "intiator of a task"???
27 mins
  -> I never suggested 'initiator of a task'. I meant my suggestion of: 'the director who requested the proposal', which is more specific than your suggestion of: 'the person who assigned the task'.
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1 day4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
(internal) client


Explanation:
It's quite common in larger companies to refer to other departments, units, etc. as clients when they assign work. Part of the professionalisation of the workplace is the adoption of market terminology. The client-supplier nature of the relationship is often underlined by the costs of the work being recharged between departments.


    Reference: http://www.orioncanada.com/cpsqa/intclie.html
    Reference: http://www.nwfusion.com/news/2001/123320_07-30-2001.html
Chris Hopley
Netherlands
Local time: 06:27
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 2117
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3 days10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
person who commissioned the assignment


Explanation:
See Alexander Schleber's comments on how awkward "the assigner" and the like sound in English. I agree with him, but might not opt for "task". Depending on the context, "project" or "report" could be more apropos.

Maria Danielson
United States
Local time: 00:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 125
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