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die u niet zouden meegedeeld zijn

English translation: ... which were reportedly not, or ... of which you were allegedly

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04:06 Sep 11, 2001
Dutch to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial
Dutch term or phrase: die u niet zouden meegedeeld zijn
In the following sentence 'Tijdens uw onderzoek [...] hebt u ons gevraagd of wij op de hoogte zijn van belangrijke aangelegenheden omtrent de hiernavolgende domeinen die u niet zouden meegedeeld zijn', should I use 'which you might not' for zouden?
Lucy Simpson
Local time: 03:06
English translation:... which were reportedly not, or ... of which you were allegedly
Explanation:
not informed.
Selected response from:

xxxjarry
South Africa
Local time: 05:06
Grading comment
Titia's answer was very comprehensive, but Jarry's use of 'allegedly/reportedly' encapsulates what, on re-reading it, I interpret to be the company's defence in the face of a thinly-veiled accusation by the auditors that the company had not provided certain information when asked. The use of the word 'allegedly' in English is in fact very powerful. My original suggestion of 'might' gives the impression that the company is being proactive rather than reactive, and saying 'look here, there's a bit more information we can give you, which might be helpful.' Which I see now is not the case!
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1... which were reportedly not, or ... of which you were allegedlyxxxjarry
5 -1of which you were not informedTitia Dijkstra
4which might not have been announced/mentioned to you
Thijs van Dorssen


  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
... which were reportedly not, or ... of which you were allegedly


Explanation:
not informed.

xxxjarry
South Africa
Local time: 05:06
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 3855
Grading comment
Titia's answer was very comprehensive, but Jarry's use of 'allegedly/reportedly' encapsulates what, on re-reading it, I interpret to be the company's defence in the face of a thinly-veiled accusation by the auditors that the company had not provided certain information when asked. The use of the word 'allegedly' in English is in fact very powerful. My original suggestion of 'might' gives the impression that the company is being proactive rather than reactive, and saying 'look here, there's a bit more information we can give you, which might be helpful.' Which I see now is not the case!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Dave Greatrix: I like allegedly,especially if this is pertaining to a dispute. (Sarcasm value)
3 hrs
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27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
which might not have been announced/mentioned to you


Explanation:
As always in life, there is more than one possibility. This one sounds good to me.
I believe that you could of course also say: which would not have been... etc.

Regards


Thijs van Dorssen
Local time: 04:06
PRO pts in pair: 22
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
of which you were not informed


Explanation:
Dear Lucy,
Although the above answers are not bad, I thought I'ld give you an explanation. I use it in legal texts, where accuracy comes first, but other then that I think it is awful use of language. Another alternative would be "of which you might not be aware" - this is nice, but not as accurate.
Your suggestion "of which you might not have been informed" is also probably fine in the context, but you should realize that the Dutch means that the recipient was definitely not informed according to the statement of the recipient. Your translation does not carry the same connotation. For instance, it still leaves the possibility of the recipient having received the info, and now receives it for the second time because the imparting party does not know whether the recipient received before or not. Still, if you want to go for normal English, it is not a bad solution. I hope this helps.


    many years of experience as a translator, legal training in England and in Holland
Titia Dijkstra
Local time: 04:06
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 84

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  xxxjarry: This is certainly not an answer a native speaker of English would have offered.
8 hrs
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