KudoZ home » Dutch to English » Names (personal, company)

Tuytel

English translation: See previous question.

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
21:07 Nov 17, 2001
Dutch to English translations [PRO]
Names (personal, company) / Proper names
Dutch term or phrase: Tuytel
This is the surname os a certain person whose name has to be transcribed in my language. He has won a certain Dutch award in the past. He may or may not be a Dutch name but I am taking a chance here.

Thanks.
Roomy Naqvy
India
Local time: 03:04
English translation:See previous question.
Explanation:
uy (old ortography) = ui

This sound is not found in English. One way to produce it: try to pronounce the English vowel sound as in hOUse with the lips tightly rounded and tongue pressed against the bottom teeth.

T, E, L as in my previous answer.
Selected response from:

Davorka Grgic
Local time: 22:34
Grading comment
Thanks a lot. Precise answer.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +1Tuytel
Evert DELOOF-SYS
4See previous question.
Davorka Grgic


  

Answers


4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
See previous question.


Explanation:
uy (old ortography) = ui

This sound is not found in English. One way to produce it: try to pronounce the English vowel sound as in hOUse with the lips tightly rounded and tongue pressed against the bottom teeth.

T, E, L as in my previous answer.


    Reference: http://www.blue.demon.nl/dutch/pronouns.htm.
Davorka Grgic
Local time: 22:34
Native speaker of: Native in CroatianCroatian, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
Thanks a lot. Precise answer.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Tuytel


Explanation:
Roomy,
You might want to try the following:

At http://www.p1.com/VertalingWoordenboek.html there is a free
Dutch-English English-dutch dictionary available for download. Here is the
description from the webpage:

The P1 VertalingWoordenboek is an electronic Dutch-English
English-Dutch dictionary designed for persons who are learning
the Dutch language.

Features:

Includes entries for past tense, making lookup of
irregular verbs easier.

Includes noun gender (de or het).

Includes pronounciation information (syllable
separation and accented syllable).

Includes plurals.

Looks up matching words as you type. Usually
you don\'t have to type in the whole word.

Windows 95/98/NT.

ITS FREE.

This program was originally created
for the use of the author and
contains typographical and other
errors. Corrections will be gratefully
accepted at woordenboek@p...


The following should be quite useful as well (but do note that the sound samples are recorded by a lady from The Netherlands - I\'m not so sure I like her pronounciation that much):


http://home.wanadoo.nl/mvgompel/pronunciation_nl_en.html

Dutch Pronunciation
(Assisted by Wil van Ganswijk)

This page will try to explain to you how to pronounce Dutch words, we have created several sound samples for your convenience. But let\'s begin with listening how exactly Dutch sounds.

Click the play button below to play a dutch sound clip, recorded by Elke van Gompel from The Netherlands:

(673kb, WAV format)

Did you play and listen to the sound sample? Now we\'ll give you the Dutch text too, so you can read with the sound sample, please try and play it again while reading the text this time:

Nederlands is een zeer ingewikkelde taal. Ook qua uitspraak is het erg moeilijk. Het Nederlands kent bijvoorbeeld veel verschillende klanken. Maar desondanks is het toch te leren, de hele bevolking van Nederland en van noord-België heeft het immers ook geleerd. De uitspraak is een beetje te vergelijken met die van het Duits of met die van Scandinavische talen. Dit stuk tekst bevat ook een aantal woorden met een wat gecompliceerdere manier van uitspreken.

We\'ll also give you the English translation so you can understand what is being said:

Dutch is a very complicated language. Also in regard to pronunciation it can be quite hard. Dutch has, for example, many different sounds. But nevertheless one can still learn it, the entire population of the Netherlands and Northern-Belgium have done it too. The pronunciation can be compared to the pronunciation of German or Scandinavian languages. This piece of text also contains a number of words with a slightly more complicated way of pronunciation.

Now you have heard some sentences in Dutch and you should be a bit more familiar with the different sounds. Pronouncing Dutch yourself can\'t be hard when you learn how to pronounce all letters. Note that the Dutch language also has some diphtongue sounds (ie, ui, eu, ei, ou, au and ij), those are two vowels that form one sound together.

Now we will teach you how to pronounce certain letters that sound different, or do not exist in English. Note that the stress/accent of a word in Dutch usually lies on the syllable before the last syllable.

A: a single A in the middle of the syllable, like the Dutch word BAD, is pronounced like the A in the english word BATH but then shorter. If an A appears at the end of a syllable such as in the Dutch word VAZEN (VA-ZEN), then the A sounds longer such as in \"Aardvark\"

AA: A double \"A\", like in the dutch word AARDBEI, sounds the same as a single \"A\" at the end of a syllable, like the AA in \"Aardvark\". Note that a double vowel almost never occurs at the end of a syllable, instead it\'s truncated to a single vowel, but with the same sound.

E: A single E in the middle of a stressed syllable, like the dutch word BED, is pronounced like the A in the english word BAD but then shorter. When an E appears at the end of a syllable, such as the first E in the dutch word METEN (ME-TEN), then it sounds like the A in the english word DATE. When a single E appears in the middle of an unstressed syllable, like the second E in the the dutch word METEN, then the sound totally changes and the E sounds more like the U in the english word MUD.

EE: A double \"E\", like in the dutch word DEEG, sounds like a single E at the end of a syllable, like the A in the english word DATE. Note that a double vowel almost never occurs at the end of a syllable, instead it\'s truncated to a single vowel, but with the same sound.

O: A single O in the middle of the syllable, like the dutch word MOT sounds as the same sounds, only shorter, as the O in the english word DOT. When occuring at the end of a syllable, like in WONEN (WO-NEN), then it sounds like OA as in the english word BOAT

OO: A double \"O\", like in the dutch word BOOT, sounds like a single O at the end of a syllable, as OA in the english word BOAT. Note that a double vowel almost never occurs at the end of a syllable, instead it\'s truncated to a single vowel, but with the same sound.

U: A dutch \"u\" in the middle of a syllable, like in the dutch word HUT, sounds like the U in the english word BUT, although a little shorter. When it appears at the end of a syllable, like in the dutch word ZUREN, then it\'s pronunciation lies somewhere between \"FULL and DOT\".

UU: A double U, as in the dutch word ZUUR,sounds the same as a single U at the end of a syllable.

R: The consonant R, like in the dutch word RADIJS, is pronouced somewhat sharper than in english.

G: The consonant G, like in the dutch word LAG, is pronounced like CH in the scottish word LOCH, but somewhat weaker.

N: An N usually sounds the same as in English, like in the dutch word NOOIT. But when an N appears at the end of a word and is preceded by an E then the N is often not heard in common speech. Like in the dutch words METEN and ZUREN

CH: The consonant combination CH, like in the dutch word LACH, is pronounced like CH in the scottish word LOCH, but somewhat weaker.

UI: The dutch diphtong UI, as in the dutch word HUIS, sounds a bit like the english word PEARL. It\'s recommended to listen to the sound because it\'s hard to explain

IJ: The dutch diphtong IJ, as in the dutch word RADIJS sounds like a bit like the english word EYE. It\'s recommended to listen to the sound because it\'s hard to explain

EI: The dutch diphtong EI, as in the dutch word PALEIS, sounds like a bit like the english word EYE and equal to the dutch diphtong IJ. It\'s recommended to listen to the sound because it\'s hard to explain

EU: The dutch diphtong EU, as in the dutch word REUS, has a special sound that is best understood by just listening to the sound.

OOI: The dutch diphtong OOI, as in the dutch word NOOIT, has a special sound that is best understood by just listening to the sound.

IEUW: The dutch diphtong IEUW, as in the dutch word NIEUW, has a special sound that is best understood by just listening to the sound.



OU: Sounds the same as OW in the english word COW




AU: Sounds the same as OW in the english word COW

Copyright(c) 2000, The Languages Made Clear Project (webmaster@languagesmadeclear.cjb.net)







Evert DELOOF-SYS
Belgium
Local time: 22:34
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in FlemishFlemish
PRO pts in category: 2

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Dave Greatrix: Thanks for the dictionary tip Evert, it works great!
1 day 10 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search