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boegbeeld

English translation: figure head

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Dutch term or phrase:boegbeeld
English translation:figure head
Entered by: Evert DELOOF-SYS
Options:
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03:04 Nov 28, 2001
Dutch to English translations [Non-PRO]
Dutch term or phrase: boegbeeld
wij willen een boegbeeld voor de stad
sammi
Local time: 16:47
figure head
Explanation:
That's it.


Always good to know:
"
Joshua asks: Where does the term figure head come from?

The figure head is the carved ornamental and painted figure erected on the bow of ships. The origin of the figure head in the early days of seagoing was twofold; a mixture of religious symbolism and the treatment of the ship as a living thing.
Early sailors thought the figure head would please the sea gods and bring protection to the vessel at sea. They also felt that a ship needed to find her own way across the water, and could only do so if she had eyes.

The ancient Egyptians provided both protection and eyes by mounting figures of holy birds on the bows; the Phoenicians used the heads of horses to symbolize both vision and swiftness; Greek ships had a boar's head for both its quick sight and ferocious reaction; Roman ships often carried a carving of a centurion to indicate their fighting quality. In the thirteenth century one of the favorite figure heads was the head and neck of a swan, possibly in the hope that the ship would possess the same mobility and stability as that bird upon the water. Other figure heads over the years have been lions, leopards, antelopes, dolphins, unicorns, dragons, tigers, eagles and many men such as St. George slaying a dragon and King Edgar on horseback.

With the advent of the clipper ship, with her graceful lines, the figure head blossomed, usually into a single figure. Figures of women were more popular than men or animals and began to replace them almost exclusively. Although women were thought to be unlucky on a ship, it was thought that a woman as a figure head could calm the seas.

(I don't make this stuff up, I just report it!)

(FYI - Figure head can be written as one word, figurehead, but according to my nautical dictionary figure head is the preferred use.)"

Selected response from:

Evert DELOOF-SYS
Belgium
Local time: 16:47
Grading comment
thanks, all
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +6figure head
Evert DELOOF-SYS
4figure head


Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
figure head


Explanation:
That's it.


Always good to know:
"
Joshua asks: Where does the term figure head come from?

The figure head is the carved ornamental and painted figure erected on the bow of ships. The origin of the figure head in the early days of seagoing was twofold; a mixture of religious symbolism and the treatment of the ship as a living thing.
Early sailors thought the figure head would please the sea gods and bring protection to the vessel at sea. They also felt that a ship needed to find her own way across the water, and could only do so if she had eyes.

The ancient Egyptians provided both protection and eyes by mounting figures of holy birds on the bows; the Phoenicians used the heads of horses to symbolize both vision and swiftness; Greek ships had a boar's head for both its quick sight and ferocious reaction; Roman ships often carried a carving of a centurion to indicate their fighting quality. In the thirteenth century one of the favorite figure heads was the head and neck of a swan, possibly in the hope that the ship would possess the same mobility and stability as that bird upon the water. Other figure heads over the years have been lions, leopards, antelopes, dolphins, unicorns, dragons, tigers, eagles and many men such as St. George slaying a dragon and King Edgar on horseback.

With the advent of the clipper ship, with her graceful lines, the figure head blossomed, usually into a single figure. Figures of women were more popular than men or animals and began to replace them almost exclusively. Although women were thought to be unlucky on a ship, it was thought that a woman as a figure head could calm the seas.

(I don't make this stuff up, I just report it!)

(FYI - Figure head can be written as one word, figurehead, but according to my nautical dictionary figure head is the preferred use.)"




Native speaker of:

25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
figure head


Explanation:
That's it.


Always good to know:
"
Joshua asks: Where does the term figure head come from?

The figure head is the carved ornamental and painted figure erected on the bow of ships. The origin of the figure head in the early days of seagoing was twofold; a mixture of religious symbolism and the treatment of the ship as a living thing.
Early sailors thought the figure head would please the sea gods and bring protection to the vessel at sea. They also felt that a ship needed to find her own way across the water, and could only do so if she had eyes.

The ancient Egyptians provided both protection and eyes by mounting figures of holy birds on the bows; the Phoenicians used the heads of horses to symbolize both vision and swiftness; Greek ships had a boar's head for both its quick sight and ferocious reaction; Roman ships often carried a carving of a centurion to indicate their fighting quality. In the thirteenth century one of the favorite figure heads was the head and neck of a swan, possibly in the hope that the ship would possess the same mobility and stability as that bird upon the water. Other figure heads over the years have been lions, leopards, antelopes, dolphins, unicorns, dragons, tigers, eagles and many men such as St. George slaying a dragon and King Edgar on horseback.

With the advent of the clipper ship, with her graceful lines, the figure head blossomed, usually into a single figure. Figures of women were more popular than men or animals and began to replace them almost exclusively. Although women were thought to be unlucky on a ship, it was thought that a woman as a figure head could calm the seas.

(I don't make this stuff up, I just report it!)

(FYI - Figure head can be written as one word, figurehead, but according to my nautical dictionary figure head is the preferred use.)"



Evert DELOOF-SYS
Belgium
Local time: 16:47
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in FlemishFlemish
PRO pts in pair: 1278
Grading comment
thanks, all

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sven Petersson
13 mins

agree  Pieter_H
34 mins

agree  xxxjarry
51 mins

agree  Sandra Nortje
57 mins

agree  Dave Greatrix
2 hrs

agree  AllisonK
1 day 8 hrs
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