KudoZ home » Dutch to English » Other

wachtboek

English translation: log book

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Dutch term or phrase:wachtboek
English translation:log book
Entered by: Dave Greatrix
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

15:13 Jan 3, 2002
Dutch to English translations [Non-PRO]
Dutch term or phrase: wachtboek
wachten
harry
log book
Explanation:
a log book is used to record any incidents or any other relevant occurences during a watch. Can apply to buildings, ships, etc.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-03 15:45:41 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Log\" is often used colloquially by sailors and starship captains . However the correct term is \"log book\" Many people hyphenate, but that is not necessary.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-03 15:50:06 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Log\" is often used colloquially by sailors and starship captains . However the correct term is \"log book\" Many people hyphenate, but that is not necessary.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-03 15:51:28 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Log\" is often used colloquially by sailors and starship captains . However the correct term is \"log book\" Many people hyphenate, but that is not necessary.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-03 16:58:26 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

> a logbook can form a part of car documents, but unless this car is keeping watch, then that is not what the question infers

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-03 18:03:44 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Titanic- The Californian
... The Titanic log book reported seeing lights, and many members of the crew mentioned
that as the Titanic went down, they spotted lights to the north of Titanic ...
www.geocities.com/SouthBeach/Surf/3051/californian.htm - 5k

A reference of \"Titanic\" proportions!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-03 18:12:24 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Article 1
1. The log-book required under Article 3 of Regulation (EEC) No 2057/82 shall be filled in by the master in accordance with the model shown in Annex I or Annex II, depending on the fishing zone, for all fishing operations relating to species subject to TACs in the respective ICES/NAFO zones as referred to in paragraph 1 of the said Article 3. The form of log-book shown in Annex I shall be used for all fishing zones except those comprised in NAFO 1 and ICES V a) and XIV, for which the log-book shown in Annex II shall be used. These log-books shall be completed in accordance with the instructions set out in Annexes IV and V respectively.
2. The log-book shown in Annex I or Annex II shall also be kept in the manner prescribed in paragraph 1 when such vessels are operating in the waters of a non-member country, unless the non-member country in question specifically requires a different kind of log-book.

Extract from EEC legislation.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-03 18:21:58 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Note above spelling, I did say some writers hyphenate.
Selected response from:

Dave Greatrix
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:54
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5 +2One word, two words
Marijke Mayer
4 +2log book
Dave Greatrix
4 +1[digression: quoting Google, etc.]
Chris Hopley
5The value of the internet for translators
Dave Greatrix
5Logbook (note spelling); according to Collinsxxxjarry
5 -1"Take" as a synonym of "require"xxxjarry
4watch log
Alexander Schleber
4Future reference
Dave Greatrix
5 -1The spelling of "logbook"xxxjarry


  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
log book


Explanation:
a log book is used to record any incidents or any other relevant occurences during a watch. Can apply to buildings, ships, etc.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-03 15:45:41 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Log\" is often used colloquially by sailors and starship captains . However the correct term is \"log book\" Many people hyphenate, but that is not necessary.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-03 15:50:06 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Log\" is often used colloquially by sailors and starship captains . However the correct term is \"log book\" Many people hyphenate, but that is not necessary.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-03 15:51:28 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Log\" is often used colloquially by sailors and starship captains . However the correct term is \"log book\" Many people hyphenate, but that is not necessary.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-03 16:58:26 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

> a logbook can form a part of car documents, but unless this car is keeping watch, then that is not what the question infers

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-03 18:03:44 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Titanic- The Californian
... The Titanic log book reported seeing lights, and many members of the crew mentioned
that as the Titanic went down, they spotted lights to the north of Titanic ...
www.geocities.com/SouthBeach/Surf/3051/californian.htm - 5k

A reference of \"Titanic\" proportions!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-03 18:12:24 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Article 1
1. The log-book required under Article 3 of Regulation (EEC) No 2057/82 shall be filled in by the master in accordance with the model shown in Annex I or Annex II, depending on the fishing zone, for all fishing operations relating to species subject to TACs in the respective ICES/NAFO zones as referred to in paragraph 1 of the said Article 3. The form of log-book shown in Annex I shall be used for all fishing zones except those comprised in NAFO 1 and ICES V a) and XIV, for which the log-book shown in Annex II shall be used. These log-books shall be completed in accordance with the instructions set out in Annexes IV and V respectively.
2. The log-book shown in Annex I or Annex II shall also be kept in the manner prescribed in paragraph 1 when such vessels are operating in the waters of a non-member country, unless the non-member country in question specifically requires a different kind of log-book.

Extract from EEC legislation.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-03 18:21:58 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Note above spelling, I did say some writers hyphenate.

Dave Greatrix
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:54
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 1747
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Massimo Lencioni: in English this is called simply a "log", not "log book"
1 min
  -> Check out Google "ship's log book". "log book" is correct. Don't take any notice of "Star Trek, :-) Truet me, my father was a master mariner for 45 years. "

agree  Hermeneutica: Especially if it refers to the watches you stand on board a boat or ship
3 mins
  -> Thank you, Dee!

agree  Marijke Mayer
27 mins
  -> a logbook can form a part of car documents, but unless this car is keeping watch, then that is not what the question infers.

neutral  xxxjarry: Logbook (note spelling), according to Longman: a document containing details of registration, ownership, etc. of a motor vehicle - not now used technically. See other definitions below.
1 hr
  -> Log book, (note spelling) is what I said it is! I know you do not like it but try Google for confirmation. By the way, accommodation doesn't "take two M's" it "has two M's"
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
watch log


Explanation:
wacht = watch, as on a ship or in a hospital,
boek = log, the journal in which entries are made concerning events during the watch.

Alexander Schleber
Belgium
Local time: 11:54
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 826
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Logbook (note spelling); according to Collins


Explanation:
Dictionary: a book containing the official record of trips made by a ship or aircraft.

Logbook (note spelling); according to Oxford Dictionary: a book containing a detailed record or log.

Logbook (note spelling); according to Chambers Dictionary: a book containing an official record of a ship's progress and proceedings on board, or of a journey made by an aircraft or car, or of any progress.

Conclusion: Logbook is spelt in one word is not confined to ships or aircraft.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-03 16:42:41 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

An interesting point though is: what is the exact definition of \"Wachtboek\"?. Is that a logbook that exclusively records tours of duty such as turns to be on guard, etc. ? My (old) Van Dale does not list the word, nor does the Du > En Van Dale or the Du > En Jansonius.

xxxjarry
South Africa
Local time: 12:54
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 3855

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Dave Greatrix: Wachtboek produced 14 results on Google which indicate that it is a "log book" (note spelling)
16 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
The spelling of "logbook"


Explanation:
I have no particular likes or dislikes when it comes to the spelling of this word and was merely quoting four sources far more authoritative than Google could ever hope to be.

I am glad we agree on the spelling of accommodation though.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-03 18:37:52 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Interestingly, my Cambridge International Dictionary of English gives the following examples for \"takes\" in the sense of \"uses\": \"My car takes five people but I only have five seat belts\". This camera takes two small batteries\". \"My camera takes 35mm films\".

xxxjarry
South Africa
Local time: 12:54
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 3855

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Dave Greatrix: I would say that an information source containing over 3 billion readily accessible documents is more use than a couple of books, even though it is a tad modern!
14 mins
  -> I think most educated native speakers will agree that Google is not an authority on spelling. A substantial number of the documents it lists may have been written by people who cannot spell or forgot to consult a dictionary.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

17 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
The value of the internet for translators


Explanation:
A common mistake by non-native English speakers is to rely too heavily on a dictionary. As in the Dutch language, in certain situations rules go out of the window with the English language.

e.g.Generally aviod using the possessive form with inanimate objects.

the table leg NOT the table's leg

this is all well and good, but if as non-native English speaker you do not know that the "table" is an inanimate object, and you think it is an animal for example, you would want to use an apostrophe. A quick "search" would dispell any doubts.

Search query "table leg" produces 30,200 results, but "table's leg" only 154 results.


My advice would be, when in doubt check your phrase on the internet.

e.g. The log book+ship search query produces 196,000 results on Google,
whereas logbook+ship produces only 12,000.

The watch+log book search query produces 347,000 results, whereas the watch+logbook search produces 17,500.

This is interesting, especially as a software product known as LogBook accounts for a large number of hits when simply searching for "logbook"

I doubt if so many authors of documents on Google are bad spellers.

I personally do not not own or possess one single solitary language reference book or dictionary, but I struggle along using technology.




--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-04 08:46:23 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Oh, and Internet should be spelt Internet!

Dave Greatrix
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:54
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 1747

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxjarry: Am I glad to have a very extensive library supplemented by Internet and other technologies. When it comes to serendipity, there is nothing to beat a good reference book. For educated native speakers a marvellous form of CPD!
1 hr
  -> Ah serendipity, the ability to make fortunate discoveries by accident. I would suggest the Internet is even better for that!-o)) (Am I?)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

21 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
[digression: quoting Google, etc.]


Explanation:
Quoting statistics from Google can be misleading without explaining the syntax you've used to obtain them. Note the difference on Google between the following queries:

+log +book +ship (= all three words ocurring in the same document) generates about 195,000 hits
http://www.google.com/search?q=log book ship

+"log book" +ship (= the phrase "log book" and the word "ship" ocurring in the same document) generates about 9,910 hits
http://www.google.com/search?q="log book" ship

+logbook +ship (= both words ocurring in the same document) generates about 12,000 hits
http://www.google.com/search?q=logbook ship

The conclusion from all this is that "log book" and "logbook" are both in currency, the latter having a slight edge, in web publications at least.

Interestingly, the results differ if you only trawl UK web sites (those in .uk):

+"log book" +ship generates 596 hits
http://www.google.com/search?q="log book" ship site:.uk

+logbook +ship generates 334 hits
http://www.google.com/search?q=logbook ship site:.uk

And on South African web sites (those in .za) the results are pretty much evenly divided (56 vs. 55 hits)

A bit of something for everyone, then? ;-]]

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-07 09:36:28 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Repsonse to feedback below:
Of course Internet documents don\'t set the standard. Not on their own, anyway. I simply wish to point out the value of the Internet in finding out about current usage when dictionaries offer two *equally valid* spellings. No dictionaries that I know of provide statistical data on the usage of variant spellings. I have two Collins dictionaries on my desk (Collins Dict. of the Eng. Lang. and Cobuild), one giving \"log book\", the other giving \"logbook\", but neither offering further information on this difference in spelling. This is where search engines like Google come into their own: statistical information on linguistic usage at the click of a mouse. As such, the Internet itself is a \"huge databank\" of actual language usage. Remember, just because you read something in treeware format doesn\'t mean it\'s sacred. Your average daily newspaper (included in the databanks you refer to) is full of spelling mistakes, mixed metaphors and other linguistic nastiness!

Chris Hopley
Netherlands
Local time: 11:54
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 2117

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxjarry: Interesting. The question remains: are documents on the Internet now setting the standard for spelling and can we discard our Oxford? Is this the trend in marking exam papers? Is it not so that reliable dictionaries obtain their data from huge databanks?
1 hr
  -> Throughout the ages, spelling in English has been "determined" by a whole host of linguistic malefactors (including Dutch printers), the most innocuous of all of them probably being the Internet. (See note above.)

agree  Dave Greatrix: Like most innovations, Google takes a bit of getting used to. The more you put in, the more accurate outcome. e.g. But i'm not educated enough for these fangled reference books, not enough pictures. So I've been told at least!
3 hrs
  -> Fear ye not! The advanced search form is David-proof ;-]] http://www.google.com/advanced_search
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 19 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Future reference


Explanation:
Future reference

Quote "Cambridge International Dictionary of English gives the following examples for "takes" in the sense of "uses": "My car takes five people but I only have five seat belts". This camera takes two small batteries". "My camera takes 35mm films".

I cannot believe that this esteemed book associates the word "takes" with the word "uses"

This is not correct, "takes" when used in this manner, does not refer to "use"

"My car can accomodate 5 people", "My car is capable of carrying 5 people", "My car can seat 5 people", "My camera can accomodate 2 batteries" or "can accomodate a 35mm film".

Used in this context "takes" has nothing at all to do with "uses"

"The fuel tank can take or takes 12 gallons", "The silo takes or can take 12000 tons of grain"

Get the idea!

So you can not say that the word "idiot" for example takes, uses, accomodates or carries two i's, however you could say it "has" two i's, or it "contains" two i's.

A given word is a fixed entity, and its state does not change. "has" or "contains" is therefore a statement of fact. Whereas "can accomodate" or "takes" is something that may or may not occur.

Unlike some, I do not pretend to be the ultimate authority on the English lingo, but this is an example of one of the English language idiosyncrasies that although difficuilt for many non-native English speakers to grasp, is naturally installed in a native speaker. This applies to all foreign languages I'm sure.

Just a little weekend food for thought!


Dave Greatrix
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:54
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 1747

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  xxxjarry: See that dictionary, p. 1486, 3rd ref. to "take", 11th line: "This camera (has room for and) uses 2 small batteries; my camera takes 35 mm films. A pity you don't own the book, it would have saved you all this trouble. Oh, and "accoMModate" takes two M's!
9 hrs

agree  Marijke Mayer: OK, Jarry, big deal, you are also not immune to typos. Can you please stop pointing out everyone else's???
10 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 days 5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
One word, two words


Explanation:
Colleagues,
I would just like to volunteer that any language is subject to change over time. I don’t need to quote examples as it’s a known fact. For instance, what typically happens if two nouns are used, these might be hyphenated for a certain period of time only for it to gradually become one word. In Dutch, as we all know, this happens abundantly, so much so that I often have to double-check whether I was using the correct form in English. During this time, it cannot be avoided that some people will use all three forms, i.e. one word, two words, Hyphenated. Some companies, newspapers, etc. have house styles, often specifying that a certain spelling should be adhered to. I have an interesting little book, named “One Word, Two Words, Hyphenated?", by Mary-Jane Gilman, referenced below, which in the past I have often consulted when living in the USA. This lady had done a considerable amount of research consulting all the prevailing dictionaries, which, incidentally, all reflect varying opinions, and then reached a conclusion resulting in aforementioned booklet. Since I started translating into British English, I have abandoned it in favour of the other references such as dictionaries, but also, yes, indeed, Google. Needless to say, I always look at the source, and then decide whether or not I will use it. This is definitely not as simple as it sounds, and in addition might take a considerable amount of time of research. For this reason and the increased globalisation, Internet will have a profound influence on the use of language. I read an article in the Economist stating that shortly about 70% or so will be speaking some form of English, as this now has become the world’s language to communicate. The automatic response to this no doubt is that there will be an increased need to uphold ‘standards’. Yes, of course, grammar rules should be followed, but one should be open to change. In the light of this, please to leave room for other people’s opinions and insights, as “times are a changing . . .” Just offer your opinion and respect the other person, quote your source, don’t put people down, and leave it at that! The ProZ site is a great place to exchange information, therefore, please, let’s keep it a friendly site, as there is no room for growth in a hostile environment.

Marijke Mayer

Review: One Word, Two Words, Hyphenated?
... In One Word, Two Words, Hyphenated?, Gilman gives us more. The book answers one question,
and one question only: the one posed in the title. It contains 14,000 ...
www.reportercentral.com/reference/bookreviews/oneword.html

Marijke Mayer
Netherlands
Local time: 11:54
Native speaker of: Dutch
PRO pts in pair: 525

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxjarry: I am with you all the way and can only endorse the reason, flexibility and tolerance you advocate. Let's interact and think like professionals and everyone will benefit.
17 mins
  -> Of course, this equally applies to you, and hope you will leave room for other people's views without trying to lord it over everyone and insisting on being right when there is no right, then I'm sure we can all be friends.

agree  Chris Hopley: An interesting topic, indeed. Let's all remember that there is no Language Police (not for English, at least), but consensus rules! Which also means that more than one spelling of a word can co-exist quite happily.
1 day 13 hrs
  -> Thank you! There's a language cop on his beat on this site though! :-)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 days 5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
"Take" as a synonym of "require"


Explanation:
The use of take, as in: the word 'accommodate' takes (requires) two m's comes to me very naturally. It is only when I am asked to explain it that I find myself at a loss for words. Hence my initial attempts at explaining it in the sense of "use". Most native speakers not trained to teach people who speak English as an acquired language (or native speakers apparently in need of such tuition, as in David's case) will feel similarly frustrated because it is so difficult to explain something that is a natural part of you and your culture.

My Collins Dictionary, under meaning 32 (tr. Grammar, HAVE or REQUIRE as part of the appropriate construction), gives the following example: "This verb takes an object".

I hope we have now settled this annoying little incident. It makes me feel like a pupil who has to account to his teacher for his actions. Be that as it may, I hope it may have benefited David and others.




    English as we speak it in South Africa.
xxxjarry
South Africa
Local time: 12:54
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 3855

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Marijke Mayer: Your sneer directed at David here was quite uncalled for, Jarry!
38 mins
  -> No sneer was meant and I don't "lord it over". That is your interpretation and I would ask that you keep your personal opinions to yourself!

disagree  Dave Greatrix: One of the benefits suggested by ProZ for gaining KudoZ points, is to "demonstrate expertise in a language pair. The only tangible assessment of ability. So please stop saying I am "incredibly stupid" and inferring that I am uneducated. Check out KudoZ.
15 hrs
  -> David Greatrix is continuing his personal vendetta against me instead of discussing the linguistic merits of my contributions. I prefer to ignore his comments.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search