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MBO/ HBO werk- en denkniveau

English translation: IVE/HVE

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06:10 Sep 13, 2000
Dutch to English translations [PRO]
Dutch term or phrase: MBO/ HBO werk- en denkniveau
I'm currently working on translating a job description, and always find this term a tricky one to translate.

Any suggestions welcome!

Many thanks,

Pikey
Anne Key
Local time: 13:09
English translation:IVE/HVE
Explanation:
MBO = intermediate vocational education (SD = in social services or AZPW = in personnel and labour)

HBO = School of Higher Vocational Education / HVE

level of working and thinking
Selected response from:

Astrid Geeraerts
Local time: 14:09
Grading comment
Very concise and clear answer, with helpful reference. Thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +1see belowKen Cox
naIVE/HVE
Astrid Geeraerts


  

Answers


19 hrs
IVE/HVE


Explanation:
MBO = intermediate vocational education (SD = in social services or AZPW = in personnel and labour)

HBO = School of Higher Vocational Education / HVE

level of working and thinking


    van Dale N-E
Astrid Geeraerts
Local time: 14:09
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch
PRO pts in pair: 38
Grading comment
Very concise and clear answer, with helpful reference. Thanks!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 days 4 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
see below


Explanation:
Since I also have trouble translating this, I was waiting to see if anyone would offer a good pat answer. I'm afraid that a straightforward dictionary translation is not going to do you a lot of good, especially in the context of job descriptions/adverts.

The trap in the dictionary definitions is the word 'vocational' ('beroeps-'). In the Dutch, this contrasts with 'scholarly/academic/scientific' ('wetenschappelijk'), while in English (at least in NA) it (roughly) contrasts with 'professional'. On top of this, the Dutch standard of education is generally higher than that of NA (I can't speak for the UK), so -- to take a pertinent example -- an HBO graduate will have a level of education and skills at least as good as, if not better than, an American university graduate (BA or BS). The difference in the Dutch system is that a 'beroeps' education is aimed at learning a (skilled) trade (at the lower levels) or a profession, while a 'wetenschappelijke' education is aimed at 'knowledge for its own sake' (at least that was the original idea).

There's a fairly common explanation that is used (at the secondary school level) to describe the characteristics of the three levels - MAVO, HAVO and VWO - and which should also hold true for their higher-level counterparts (MBO, HBO and WO). It goes something like, "a MAVO student can use specific, learned techniques to solve familiar problems, a HAVO student undertstands how to apply learned techniques to the solution of problems, and a VWO student understands how to analyse problems and formulate solutions". In other words, the ability for original, creative and independent thought and action (within the context of the school system) increases as you go up through the levels.

To get back to the original question: in the Netherlands, if you say 'the working and thinking level of an MBO/HBOer', everyone knows what to expect -- something ranging from a skilled worker with a limited amount of initiative who works under supervision, to a trained professional who can take initiative and work with little or no supervision -- and in any case, someone with a practical orientation. Not a dud, but also not a rocket scientist (so to speak). In your case, I can only suggest that you take the above explanations into consideration and look at a few recruitment adverts in good US and/or UK newspapers and trade journals, to see what terms they use (they must be fairly standard; nobody can churn out so much repetitive material without using standard phrases).

Ken Cox
Local time: 14:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1385

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Marijke Singer
2224 days
  -> thanks -- I'd totally forgotten this posting
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