Where for art thou, Romeo ?

Dutch translation: Waarom ben jij, Romeo

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Where for art thou, Romeo ?
Dutch translation:Waarom ben jij, Romeo
Entered by: Evert DELOOF-SYS

19:28 Aug 22, 2001
English to Dutch translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: Where for art thou, Romeo ?
none needed
Ann
Waarom ben jij, Romeo
Explanation:
Waarom ben jij, Romeo? (not 'waar' =where)

Lament from Romeo and Juliet.

A bit like: 'Why am I, I and my intricate image?' by Dylan Thomas (if I recall correctly).


Reference via www.google.com:

Wherefore art thou, Science@NASA?

In an editorial, Dr. Tony Phillips briefly reviews the history of Science.nasa.gov and announces plans for SpaceScience.com.


What's in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet.

Jan 15, 2000: The recent announcements about the cancellation of NASA's web site science.nasa.gov (SNG) have been met with dismay and frustration by many readers. I've received an avalanche of email praising our work, asking "why!?", and advocating a change of mind. All of us who contributed to SNG appreciate these messages of support and condolence.

SNG was regarded by many as NASA's top education and science news site. Our mission was to bring NASA science research closer to the taxpayer. We tried to do this in innovative ways, by inviting readers to participate in science research through "Partners in Discovery," by means of live events like meteor balloon flights, and through high quality science news stories crafted with the direct participation of NASA scientists. A very popular spin-off of SNG was our Thursday's Classroom web site.

Right: Artist Duane Hilton, of Bishop Web Works, produced much of the original art for Science.NASA.gov and related sites, like ThursdaysClassroom.com and SpaceWeather.com. Duane will be a part of the SpaceScience.com team.

In 1999, SNG won the People's Voice Webby Award for science sites on the internet. It was the only government web site nominated for this prestigious honor.

Our web site not only conveyed the latest research news to lay people, but it also alerted scientists to the work of other scientists. As a result of SNG stories, meteorite impacts on the Moon were observed for the first time, extraterrestrial meteoroids were captured in the stratosphere, a global network of scientists monitored the Earth's gravitational field during the August 1999 solar eclipse, and certain materials science experiments were selected for flight on the Space Shuttle. The idea that science communications could actually trigger new science was exciting.

Clearly, SNG was an important, redeeming activity, and it shouldn't go away.

The SNG tradition of excellence will now continue at SpaceScience.com, which was the official sister site of Science.nasa.gov until two weeks ago. There will still be coverage of NASA news with daily stories, new lesson plans for Thursday's Classroom, live sky events -- in short, SpaceScience.com will do everything you've come to expect from SNG.

My company, Bishop Web Works, was the prime contractor for SNG web content. We supplied art, supporting *.com web sites, educational lesson plans for Thursday's Classroom, and - along with Dave Dooling and others - original headline stories. All of the Bishop Web Works team will still be involved with SpaceScience.com and we expect contributions from former SNG writers as well.

For now, SpaceScience.com will be operated as a private enterprise. This may not be a permanent situation as we hope to attract support from other NASA centers. Indeed, there are already signs that the Marshall Space Flight center may be reconsidering its decision.

Meanwhile you can help support our efforts by remaining a subscriber of the SpaceScience.com email news service. Daily updates will continue. If you're already on our mailing list no action on your part will be necessary. If you no longer receive email notices, please visit http://spacescience.com/news/subscribe.htm to resubscribe.

Sincerely,
Tony Phillips

Editor's note: In Romeo and Juliet, "Wherefore art thou, Romeo" was a lament that meant "Why are you Romeo?"

Selected response from:

Evert DELOOF-SYS
Belgium
Local time: 19:20
Grading comment
Thank you
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
nawaarom is uw naam Romeo?
lkoch99
naWaarom ben jij, Romeo
Evert DELOOF-SYS
naWaar zijt gij, Romeo?
Davorka Grgic


  

Answers


4 hrs
Waar zijt gij, Romeo?


Explanation:
none needed


    none needed
Davorka Grgic
Local time: 19:20
Native speaker of: Native in CroatianCroatian, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 63
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs
Waarom ben jij, Romeo


Explanation:
Waarom ben jij, Romeo? (not 'waar' =where)

Lament from Romeo and Juliet.

A bit like: 'Why am I, I and my intricate image?' by Dylan Thomas (if I recall correctly).


Reference via www.google.com:

Wherefore art thou, Science@NASA?

In an editorial, Dr. Tony Phillips briefly reviews the history of Science.nasa.gov and announces plans for SpaceScience.com.


What's in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet.

Jan 15, 2000: The recent announcements about the cancellation of NASA's web site science.nasa.gov (SNG) have been met with dismay and frustration by many readers. I've received an avalanche of email praising our work, asking "why!?", and advocating a change of mind. All of us who contributed to SNG appreciate these messages of support and condolence.

SNG was regarded by many as NASA's top education and science news site. Our mission was to bring NASA science research closer to the taxpayer. We tried to do this in innovative ways, by inviting readers to participate in science research through "Partners in Discovery," by means of live events like meteor balloon flights, and through high quality science news stories crafted with the direct participation of NASA scientists. A very popular spin-off of SNG was our Thursday's Classroom web site.

Right: Artist Duane Hilton, of Bishop Web Works, produced much of the original art for Science.NASA.gov and related sites, like ThursdaysClassroom.com and SpaceWeather.com. Duane will be a part of the SpaceScience.com team.

In 1999, SNG won the People's Voice Webby Award for science sites on the internet. It was the only government web site nominated for this prestigious honor.

Our web site not only conveyed the latest research news to lay people, but it also alerted scientists to the work of other scientists. As a result of SNG stories, meteorite impacts on the Moon were observed for the first time, extraterrestrial meteoroids were captured in the stratosphere, a global network of scientists monitored the Earth's gravitational field during the August 1999 solar eclipse, and certain materials science experiments were selected for flight on the Space Shuttle. The idea that science communications could actually trigger new science was exciting.

Clearly, SNG was an important, redeeming activity, and it shouldn't go away.

The SNG tradition of excellence will now continue at SpaceScience.com, which was the official sister site of Science.nasa.gov until two weeks ago. There will still be coverage of NASA news with daily stories, new lesson plans for Thursday's Classroom, live sky events -- in short, SpaceScience.com will do everything you've come to expect from SNG.

My company, Bishop Web Works, was the prime contractor for SNG web content. We supplied art, supporting *.com web sites, educational lesson plans for Thursday's Classroom, and - along with Dave Dooling and others - original headline stories. All of the Bishop Web Works team will still be involved with SpaceScience.com and we expect contributions from former SNG writers as well.

For now, SpaceScience.com will be operated as a private enterprise. This may not be a permanent situation as we hope to attract support from other NASA centers. Indeed, there are already signs that the Marshall Space Flight center may be reconsidering its decision.

Meanwhile you can help support our efforts by remaining a subscriber of the SpaceScience.com email news service. Daily updates will continue. If you're already on our mailing list no action on your part will be necessary. If you no longer receive email notices, please visit http://spacescience.com/news/subscribe.htm to resubscribe.

Sincerely,
Tony Phillips

Editor's note: In Romeo and Juliet, "Wherefore art thou, Romeo" was a lament that meant "Why are you Romeo?"



Evert DELOOF-SYS
Belgium
Local time: 19:20
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in FlemishFlemish
PRO pts in pair: 2706
Grading comment
Thank you
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 hrs
waarom is uw naam Romeo?


Explanation:
usual translation

English version often misinterpreted; this translation is unambiguous


    Reference: http://home.student.utwente.nl/j.w.dijkshoorn/grieks/woorden...
lkoch99
Local time: 13:20
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 32
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