Limonade

French translation: citronade

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Limonade
French translation:citronade
Entered by: Thierry Darlis

13:28 Jul 22, 2013
English to French translations [PRO]
Food & Drink
English term or phrase: Limonade
Limonade in English has not the same meaning as in French . Is there a translation for this kind of beverage ? Thanks
Thierry Darlis
United States
Local time: 05:05
citronade
Explanation:
une suggestion....
Selected response from:

florence metzger
Local time: 11:05
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5limonade OR citronnade (or citron pressé in specific cases) [target audience is of the essence!]
Louis La Bonté
3 +2citron pressé
Marion Feildel
3 +2citronade
florence metzger
4Diabolo citron
Hyacinthe Kemp


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
limonade
Diabolo citron


Explanation:
Limonade is a sweet feezy drink lemon flavoured. A "diabolo" is made with the French "limonade" which is a sugary feezy soda drink with a sirop.

Hyacinthe Kemp
France
Local time: 11:05
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: French
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  John ANTHONY: Le diabolo de mon enfance - et encore maintenant - est une boisson composée de sirop (citron, fraise, etc...) + limonade.
12 mins
  -> Vous avez raison, si l'on parle de "lemonade", terme britannique, il s'agit d'une boisson gazeuse avec un sirop, contrairement au citron pressé ou à la citronade.
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23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
limonade
citronade


Explanation:
une suggestion....

florence metzger
Local time: 11:05
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 28

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kévin Bernier
8 mins
  -> merci

neutral  Marion Feildel: avec deux n, ce serait meilleur :)
51 mins

agree  Sophie Oliveau-Moore: D'accord pour citronnade
1 day 40 mins
  -> merci
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
lemonade
citron pressé


Explanation:
for LEMONADE.

When it comes to citron pressé (lemonade) - the French know how to do it right! Follow these 5 simple steps to make your own frothy citron ...

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Note added at 25 mins (2013-07-22 13:53:41 GMT)
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DICTIONARY
lemonade
n 1: sweetened beverage of diluted lemon juice

Marion Feildel
Turkey
Local time: 12:05
Native speaker of: French
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  John ANTHONY: I'm sorry, but lemonade is not citron pressé, which is either lemon juice or squeezed lemon.
8 mins

agree  writeaway
58 mins
  -> merci

agree  Tony M: Can be, depoends on whether it is 'traditional' lemonade, or the artificial fizzy soda stuff
4 hrs
  -> thank you, Tony
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
lemonade
limonade OR citronnade (or citron pressé in specific cases) [target audience is of the essence!]


Explanation:
The answer to your question is highly dependent on your target audience:

1) what people in France call a "citronnade" is called "limonade" in Quebec (probably due to English influence), i.e. a beverage made with lemon and sugared water;

2) in France, a "limonade" is a colourless sweet fizzy drink; in Quebec, I do not think it has a specific name. In a real context, people I know (including me) would just call it "Sprite," "7 Up" or the like. In a formal context or if you just want to avoid using a brand name, you could call it "boisson gazeuse au citron" or a similar description;

3) According to the OQLF (see reference), you can use "citron pressé" in the specific case of a lemonade made with freshly squeezed lemons; I actually never saw or heard it in a real context, but I think anybody would understand.

By the way, I see someone suggested "Diabolo citron," which may be perfectly well understood in France, but in Quebec I think most people would have no idea what you are talking about.

Example sentence(s):
  • (Un Québécois en France) J\'ai commandé une limonade, et le serveur m\'a apporté un Sprite!
  • (Un Français au Québec) J\'ai commandé une limonade, et le serveur m\'a apporté une citronnade. Même pas gazéifiée!

    Reference: http://gdt.oqlf.gouv.qc.ca/ficheOqlf.aspx?Id_Fiche=8872491
Louis La Bonté
Canada
Local time: 05:05
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
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