cutting together spots, shorts, or features

French translation: Montage

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:cutting together spots, shorts, or features
French translation:Montage

23:01 Aug 31, 2018
    The asker opted for community grading. The question was closed on 2018-09-04 12:54:07 based on peer agreement (or, if there were too few peer comments, asker preference.)


English to French translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Media / Multimedia / in a computer application
English term or phrase: cutting together spots, shorts, or features
Bonjour,
Je dois traduire la phrase suivante : Whether you're cutting together spots, shorts, or features, you push your system to the max. Elle s'adresse à des artistes.
Je ne comprends pas ce que signifie "cutting together spots, shorts, or features". Quelqu'un pourrait-il m'éclairer?
Merci!
colaumide
Local time: 07:20
Montage
Explanation:
Spots, shorts and features are all types of films or videos (a feature = feature length like a normal movie or documentary; shorts = short films; spots = TV advertisement). Cutting together = combining footage that isn't continuous (for instance, cutting from a long shot to a close-up). "Montage" is the word for the technical process of choosing what footage to use, editing it together so it flows, and combining it with sound--i.e. the technical process of actually putting together a finished film/video. Since it's a noun in French vs. a verb in the source language, you would have to rephrase the sentence when translating.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs (2018-09-01 05:00:23 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

PS: As you can see I was just talking about the translation of "cutting together." For spots, shorts and features, you can easily look up the French terms once you know that the context is cinema/TV. Assuming this is European French, you can say "un spot publicitaire" or "une pub" for spot; the others are pretty universally "un court métrage" and "un long métrage."
Selected response from:

Eliza Hall
United States
Local time: 01:20
Grading comment
Thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4Montage
Eliza Hall


  

Answers


5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Montage


Explanation:
Spots, shorts and features are all types of films or videos (a feature = feature length like a normal movie or documentary; shorts = short films; spots = TV advertisement). Cutting together = combining footage that isn't continuous (for instance, cutting from a long shot to a close-up). "Montage" is the word for the technical process of choosing what footage to use, editing it together so it flows, and combining it with sound--i.e. the technical process of actually putting together a finished film/video. Since it's a noun in French vs. a verb in the source language, you would have to rephrase the sentence when translating.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs (2018-09-01 05:00:23 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

PS: As you can see I was just talking about the translation of "cutting together." For spots, shorts and features, you can easily look up the French terms once you know that the context is cinema/TV. Assuming this is European French, you can say "un spot publicitaire" or "une pub" for spot; the others are pretty universally "un court métrage" and "un long métrage."


    Reference: http://www.ateliercineson.fr/wp-content/uploads/.../lexique-...
Eliza Hall
United States
Local time: 01:20
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Barbara Carrara: French translation of the posted phrase is missing...
57 mins

agree  FX Fraipont
1 hr

agree  Renvi Ulrich: Excellente référence, Eliza!
1 hr

agree  Tony M: Note that the S/T is really flawed, since one would never say 'cutting together', unless the implication was 'disparate material' (not the case here) 'editing' would have been a clearer term to use! Other terms --> separate questions under rule 2.3.
2 hrs

agree  HERBET Abel: oui
2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search