over (en finissant de parler dans une conversation à distance)

French translation: à vous !

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:over
French translation:à vous !
Entered by: Tony M

22:51 Jul 31, 2019
English to French translations [Non-PRO]
Telecom(munications) / radio jargon
English term or phrase: over (en finissant de parler dans une conversation à distance)
Est-ce qu'il y a en français une expression analogue de l'expression anglaise 'over', qu'on utilise quand on finit de parler dans le cadre d'une conversation à distance? Comme dans: Quand t'as fini de parler dit "over" et... lâche le bouton.
enaskitis
Local time: 13:19
à vous !
Explanation:
When the conversation is continuing, it just means "your turn to speak now", so this would be a more accurate translation.

Note that GDT also suggests the rather curious but quite apt 'verso' — however, this doesn't seem to be at all widely used!

https://www.larousse.fr/dictionnaires/anglais-francais/over/...

You have to scroll down quite a way to find it, but it does highlight the difference between 'over' and 'over and out'.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 hrs (2019-08-01 09:33:56 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The origin of the term is of course "(handing the conversation back) over to you now", and was necessary in the early days of half-duplex radio communication using AM, as it was not obvious when the carrier had dropped out, indicating end of the transmission (which, incidentally, is referred to as 'an over'!). Most modern analogue communications use FM, where the presence or absence of the carrier gives an unequivocal and automatic indication of the next person's turn to speak.
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 12:19
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +3à vous !
Tony M
5Parlez !
Debora Blake
4terminé
Philippe Noth


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
terminé


Explanation:
C'est toujours ce que j'ai entendu dans les films.

Confirmation par certaines sources, dont celle ci-dessous.


    https://wiki.halo.fr/Lexique_radio_et_militaire
Philippe Noth
Switzerland
Local time: 12:19
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  GILOU
6 hrs

disagree  Tony M: That would actually translate "over and out" — in the normal situation, 'over' on its own suggests the conversation is ongoing.
7 hrs

agree  florence metzger
10 hrs

disagree  Elisabeth Richard: agree with Tony's comment
13 hrs

disagree  Debora Blake: I agree with Tony's comment, too.
1 day 11 hrs

agree  Geneviève Granger
1 day 15 hrs
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
over
à vous !


Explanation:
When the conversation is continuing, it just means "your turn to speak now", so this would be a more accurate translation.

Note that GDT also suggests the rather curious but quite apt 'verso' — however, this doesn't seem to be at all widely used!

https://www.larousse.fr/dictionnaires/anglais-francais/over/...

You have to scroll down quite a way to find it, but it does highlight the difference between 'over' and 'over and out'.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 hrs (2019-08-01 09:33:56 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The origin of the term is of course "(handing the conversation back) over to you now", and was necessary in the early days of half-duplex radio communication using AM, as it was not obvious when the carrier had dropped out, indicating end of the transmission (which, incidentally, is referred to as 'an over'!). Most modern analogue communications use FM, where the presence or absence of the carrier gives an unequivocal and automatic indication of the next person's turn to speak.


Tony M
France
Local time: 12:19
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 178
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ph_B: Cf. discussion.
3 hrs
  -> Merci, Ph_B !

agree  Elisabeth Richard
5 hrs
  -> Thanks, Elizabeth!

agree  Christian Fournier
2 days 1 hr
  -> Merci, Christian !
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1 day 11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Parlez !


Explanation:
Une autre possibilité que j'entends souvent.


    https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vocabulaire_radio_professionnel
Debora Blake
France
Local time: 12:19
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
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