umbaugh

German translation: s.u.

05:33 Jan 7, 2005
English to German translations [PRO]
Names (personal, company)
English term or phrase: umbaugh
it's my last name and i want to know what it means.
Marilyn Umbaugh
German translation:s.u.
Explanation:
It's a derivation or rather an anglicized version of the common German name "Umbach". That was originally the name of a village in Hesse, near Fulda. The village was named after a millrace called Umbach, "Bach" meaning "stream" in German. There's a website in German about this placename dating back to the 12th century (the place, not the website ;-)). I have relatives called Umbach.


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Note added at 53 mins (2005-01-07 06:27:05 GMT)
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RootsWeb: IN-CENSUS-LOOKUP-L Re: [IN-CENSUS-LOOKUP] 1860/Allen ... - [
... UMBACH in Vanderburgh Co. This is the only UMBAUGH spelling in 1860 IN- UMBAUGH,
CATHARINE State: IN Year: 1860 County: Harrison County Record Type: Federal ...
archiver.rootsweb.com/th/ read/IN-CENSUS-LOOKUP/2003-11/1067904897 - 14k - Zusätzliches Ergebnis - Im Cache - Ähnliche Seiten

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Note added at 1 hr 3 mins (2005-01-07 06:36:36 GMT)
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To Edith:

Variations in spelling are very common. I don\'t have to get a \"u\" from anywhere. It\'s a phonetic adjustment or analogy if anything.

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Note added at 1 hr 12 mins (2005-01-07 06:45:51 GMT)
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OK - I just googled Umbach + Umbaugh and hat 94 hits:

http://www.google.de/search?hl=de&q=Umbach umbaugh&btnG=Goog...

Some refer to different spellings of the same name.

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Note added at 1 hr 56 mins (2005-01-07 07:29:43 GMT)
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Make that \"... and got (not *hat*) 94 hits\". Past my bedtime.
Selected response from:

Anglo-German (X)
Germany
Local time: 18:36
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +2s.u.
Anglo-German (X)
5It does not mean anything in German
Edith Kelly


  

Answers


23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
It does not mean anything in German


Explanation:
.

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Note added at 23 mins (2005-01-07 05:57:05 GMT)
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It it has been Umbau*c*h, it would mean: around the belly

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Note added at 30 mins (2005-01-07 06:04:26 GMT)
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Withouth the *gh*, it could mean reconstruction, rebuilding (of a house or whatever)

Edith Kelly
Switzerland
Local time: 18:36
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Anglo-German (X): It does.
1 min
  -> So what does it mean? Please tell me. ADD: Strange, first you have a neutral, then a disagree.

agree  Christian: It's a name, but it doesn't have a specific meaning in German.
8 mins
  -> Yes, thanks.
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31 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
s.u.


Explanation:
It's a derivation or rather an anglicized version of the common German name "Umbach". That was originally the name of a village in Hesse, near Fulda. The village was named after a millrace called Umbach, "Bach" meaning "stream" in German. There's a website in German about this placename dating back to the 12th century (the place, not the website ;-)). I have relatives called Umbach.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 53 mins (2005-01-07 06:27:05 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

RootsWeb: IN-CENSUS-LOOKUP-L Re: [IN-CENSUS-LOOKUP] 1860/Allen ... - [
... UMBACH in Vanderburgh Co. This is the only UMBAUGH spelling in 1860 IN- UMBAUGH,
CATHARINE State: IN Year: 1860 County: Harrison County Record Type: Federal ...
archiver.rootsweb.com/th/ read/IN-CENSUS-LOOKUP/2003-11/1067904897 - 14k - Zusätzliches Ergebnis - Im Cache - Ähnliche Seiten

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 3 mins (2005-01-07 06:36:36 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

To Edith:

Variations in spelling are very common. I don\'t have to get a \"u\" from anywhere. It\'s a phonetic adjustment or analogy if anything.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 12 mins (2005-01-07 06:45:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

OK - I just googled Umbach + Umbaugh and hat 94 hits:

http://www.google.de/search?hl=de&q=Umbach umbaugh&btnG=Goog...

Some refer to different spellings of the same name.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 56 mins (2005-01-07 07:29:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Make that \"... and got (not *hat*) 94 hits\". Past my bedtime.


    Reference: http://www.niestetal.de/geschichte.html
Anglo-German (X)
Germany
Local time: 18:36
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Christian: It's some kind of a proper name then without a specific meaning, isn't it.
2 mins
  -> The specific meaning is geographic and must have meant something like "stream running around the ... (whatever... the mill, the monastery).

neutral  Edith Kelly: Very far fetched, it could also be an anglicised version of just anything. And where do you get the *u* from? ADD: It still does not mean anything.
3 mins
  -> I just added a note, a reference with both spellings.

agree  writeaway: names don't necessarily have 'meanings' but they do have origins
1 hr
  -> Thanks - that's where etymology comes in. All origins including placenames were meaningful in the beginning. Und am Anfang war das Wort ;-).

neutral  RomEst (X): If you think of a phonetic derivation Umbach - Umbauch, what about Schumacher - Schurmacher, Uhrmacher - Fuhrmacher, or Lawson (son of Law) - Lawsoon, Baker - Banker, More - Moore etc. Would you cansider these as derivations of names?
1 hr
  -> Yes to Lawson and Lawsoon, More and Moore, no to Banker and Baker, as that's unlikely :-). I'm not a genealogist, though, just a linguist. Why don't you do a little research yourself?

agree  Harry Bornemann: Maybe the endig -augh is scottish? I don't know any other English dialect in which the ch of Bach can be pronounced..
3 hrs
  -> Och aye, a Bach debauched - why not, probably wearing a kilt, too.
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