Tom, Dick and Harry

Greek translation: κουτσή Μαρία

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Tom, Dick and Harry
Greek translation:κουτσή Μαρία
Entered by: Calliope Sofianopoulos (X)

13:29 Oct 30, 2005
English to Greek translations [PRO]
Linguistics
English term or phrase: Tom, Dick and Harry
Please, give me the equivalent in your language (or in more languages, if you have an idea). Like Fulano y Mengana (Spanish), Caio, Tizio e Sempronio (Italian), etc. I need to know how do you call "mister nobody"!
Thanks.
Neva M.
Local time: 16:27
και η κουτσή Μαρία
Explanation:
The English term needs to be in context in order to correspond to this Greek term. The English context would normally be something to the effect of: "He invited every Tom, Dick and Harry to his wedding". In the same context, the Greek equivalent would be: "Κάλεσε και την *κουτσή Μαρία* στον γάμο του". "Κουτσή Μαρία" literally means "lame/one-legged/limping/disabled Maria". In other words, "He invited everybody, including lame Maria, to his wedding".

Otherwise, "Mr. Nobody" is a different kettle of fish altogether. That would be "ο κύριος Κανένας", but nothing to do with Tom, Dick or Harry :-)

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Note added at 2 hrs 39 mins (2005-10-30 16:09:40 GMT)
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Just a clarification, in view of Andy's comment below:

If we're looking for a non-offensive alternative, I'm afraid it will be difficult to find one that is correct within the context. In the "well-to-do" homes of a Greece, long-gone but not forgotten, "Koutsi Maria" was not welcome and neither were the poor, laikoi, sara and mara. On the other hand, these expressions are directly to the point of the English context above. "Koutsi Maria" also is a real name so, if this is the point of the question, then "Koutsi Maria" it is. As for "kathe karydias karydi", this has a different meaning altogether. We normally use this expression when we have a gathering of people in the same place that are very different from each other. In other words, if we have a room full of people of different cultures, backgrounds etc. The English context is "people of no significance" etc in the sense of Tom, Dick and Harry. This is most accurately expressed by use of the extremely offensive in the eyes of other cultures, very widely-used "Koutsi Maria".
Selected response from:

Calliope Sofianopoulos (X)
Australia
Local time: 23:27
Grading comment
And THANK YOU very much everybody! You are so great, it has been a real pleasure asking you a question :)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +10και η κουτσή Μαρία
Calliope Sofianopoulos (X)
3 +7κάθε καρυδιάς καρύδι
Daphne Theodoraki
4 +4η σάρα και η μάρα
Nick Lingris
4 +2Μήτσοι και Κατίνες
Costas Zannis
4 +2ο καθένας, οποιοσδήποτε, όποιος να' ναι
Vicky Papaprodromou
1 -1just a note - some nice expressions here!
Andreas THEODOROU


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
tom, dick and harry
ο καθένας, οποιοσδήποτε, όποιος να' ναι


Explanation:
As far as I know, there are no equivalent names used in Greek. We just say "everybody, anybody, whoever" depending on the situation.

Vicky Papaprodromou
Greece
Local time: 16:27
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in category: 14

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  María Roberto (X): Yes, and "Mister Nobody" has another meaning in English. http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Mister Nobody... Fulano y Mengano no es lo mismo que "Mr. Nobody" ΅Saludos !
11 mins
  -> Thanks, Marva. Indeed, "Mr. Nobody" is absolutely different. Cheers and greetings to Argentina!

agree  Andreas THEODOROU: I prefer οποιοσδήποτε
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Andy. Me, too. :-)
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46 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +7
tom, dick and harry
κάθε καρυδιάς καρύδι


Explanation:
Tom, Dick, and Harry
A phrase referring to randomly chosen people: “I asked you to keep my plans secret, but you’ve told them to every Tom, Dick, and Harry.”
http://www.bartleby.com/59/4/tomdickandha.html

Tom, Dick, and Harry
n. Informal
Anybody at all; a member of the public at large: It's not a smart idea to admit every Tom, Dick, and Harry to the party.
http://www.yourdictionary.com/ahd/t/t0257500.html

The Greek idiom means "all sorts of people".

Daphne Theodoraki
Sweden
Local time: 15:27
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nick Lingris: Neva may be looking for "koutsi Maria" but we are building a beautiful collection of phrases here!
8 mins
  -> Yes, aren't we? The lack of context also helps guesswork ;-)

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou: Καλησπέρα, Δαφνούλι. Εσείς τι καρύδια έχετε εκεί;
9 mins
  -> Καλησπέρα, Βίκυ!

agree  Maria Karra: I never liked "koutsi Maria" (for obvious reasons) :)
25 mins
  -> :-D

agree  Andreas THEODOROU
1 hr
  -> :-)

agree  Spiros Doikas
1 hr
  -> :-)

agree  María Roberto (X): w/Maria Karra
1 hr
  -> :-)

agree  Assimina Vavoula
23 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
tom, dick and harry
Μήτσοι και Κατίνες


Explanation:
Mitsi ke Katines

Costas Zannis
Local time: 16:27
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Calliope Sofianopoulos (X): Συλλογή κάνουμε; Τι λες για "Μπαρμπα-Μήτσοι και Κυρα-Κατίνες"; Να βάλουμε και κάναν Κυρ-Κώτσο μέσα; Καλή σας μέρα και χρυσή αγαπητέ :-)
7 mins

agree  Nick Lingris: Κουτσοί στραβοί στον Αγιο Παντελεήμονα...
1 hr
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16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +10
tom, dick and harry
και η κουτσή Μαρία


Explanation:
The English term needs to be in context in order to correspond to this Greek term. The English context would normally be something to the effect of: "He invited every Tom, Dick and Harry to his wedding". In the same context, the Greek equivalent would be: "Κάλεσε και την *κουτσή Μαρία* στον γάμο του". "Κουτσή Μαρία" literally means "lame/one-legged/limping/disabled Maria". In other words, "He invited everybody, including lame Maria, to his wedding".

Otherwise, "Mr. Nobody" is a different kettle of fish altogether. That would be "ο κύριος Κανένας", but nothing to do with Tom, Dick or Harry :-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 39 mins (2005-10-30 16:09:40 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Just a clarification, in view of Andy's comment below:

If we're looking for a non-offensive alternative, I'm afraid it will be difficult to find one that is correct within the context. In the "well-to-do" homes of a Greece, long-gone but not forgotten, "Koutsi Maria" was not welcome and neither were the poor, laikoi, sara and mara. On the other hand, these expressions are directly to the point of the English context above. "Koutsi Maria" also is a real name so, if this is the point of the question, then "Koutsi Maria" it is. As for "kathe karydias karydi", this has a different meaning altogether. We normally use this expression when we have a gathering of people in the same place that are very different from each other. In other words, if we have a room full of people of different cultures, backgrounds etc. The English context is "people of no significance" etc in the sense of Tom, Dick and Harry. This is most accurately expressed by use of the extremely offensive in the eyes of other cultures, very widely-used "Koutsi Maria".

Calliope Sofianopoulos (X)
Australia
Local time: 23:27
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
And THANK YOU very much everybody! You are so great, it has been a real pleasure asking you a question :)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou: Since Neva is talking about any insignificant person, this answer definitely fits the context. Hi Calliope!
16 mins
  -> Thanks, Vicky. Have a great day :-)

agree  Nick Lingris: If Neva is looking for names, this is what she wants. "Sara and mara" are not names.
35 mins
  -> Thank you Nick. I totally agree, but they are supposed to be mistaken as such, and I definitely agree with their meaning in context. But, yes you are right. Thanks again :-)

agree  Spiros Doikas
1 hr
  -> Thanks Spiro :-)

agree  Natassa Iosifidou: The best of all!
1 hr
  -> Thank you Natassa :-)

agree  kaydee
2 hrs
  -> Thank you :-)

agree  Elena Petelos: Ι love google: http://tinyurl.com/8xvmk Παραδειγματάκι: «έγινε της μόδας η αναρχία, φρίκεψε και η κουτσή Μαρία» http://tinyurl.com/eyoax
3 hrs
  -> So do I. Thanks Elena :-)//Thanks again Elena.

agree  Andreas THEODOROU
5 hrs
  -> Thank you too :-)

agree  Nadia-Anastasia Fahmi
15 hrs

agree  Anastasia Giagopoulou
18 hrs

agree  Assimina Vavoula
23 hrs
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33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
every Tom, Dick and Harry
η σάρα και η μάρα


Explanation:
Just another translation for "every Tom, Dick and Harry".

However, Neva, you should make your query more precise, not just for Greek but for any language. If you want to have the equivalent of an English phrase or idiom in other languages, put the English idiom in a sentence. Mr Nobody is different from a Mr somebody-or-other and from every Tom, Dick and Harry.
For this reason you will also get a variety of Greek translations, including the above, or e.g. ο πώς-τον-λένε, ο αποτέτοιος.
Do also define whether you want the Greek in Latin characters.

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Note added at 51 mins (2005-10-30 14:21:44 GMT)
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If you're making a collection of *names* that go into this sort of context, you won't do better than "koutsi Maria".
There are some Greeks that think that "sara kai mara" in the above phrase are names, but the etymology is different.
In other contexts, we might use "ο κάθε άσχετος" for "every nobody".

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Note added at 5 hrs 29 mins (2005-10-30 18:59:35 GMT)
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For the benefit of readers, let me add the phrase "τάτσι μίτσι κότσι" [tátsi mítsi kótsi], which usually appears in the combinations "είναι τάτσι μίτσι κότσι με κάποιον" or "τα έχουν κάνει τάτσι μίτσι κότσι", meaning they are in cahoots, they have some secret agreement. Nothing to do with the question asked, but the interesting thing here is that it is thought to come from the Albanian names for Tasos, Mitsos and Kotsos.

Nick Lingris
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:27
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in category: 48

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Daphne Theodoraki: I don't think it's "o apotetoios, etc." she's looking for, but I may be wrong....
1 min
  -> Thanks, Daphne. Seeing Neva's note, I understand she wants something like "o pos-ton-lene" (whathisname) rather than "i sara kai i mara", especially since these are not names (though I do have friends called Sarah and Mara :-)

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou: Or "i mia kai i alli" if talking about women (as in Mia Farrow and Ali Mc Graw). :-)))//Nαι, γιατι εσείς τα αγοράκια τείνετε να γυρνάτε με την μια και με την άλλη ή και με δυο μαζί. Ήθελα να προσθέσω το κακό συναπάντημα, αλλά με πρόκαμε η Καλλιόπη.
10 mins
  -> Ναι, θυμάμαι τότε που η Μία Φάροου παράτησε τον Σινάτρα, που είπα "Και τι ανάγκη έχει αυτός; Τώρα θα πάρει Δύο Φάροου".

agree  Calliope Sofianopoulos (X): Exactly, they are supposed to be words that can be mistaken for names, so I agree with this one too. Plus the added advantage of keeping within the said context in my opinion// I prefer the full version, με το κακό συναπάντημα :-) Καλημέρα//Πάντα :-))
17 mins
  -> Kalimera, Calliope. To diaskedazoume, etsi?

agree  Andreas THEODOROU
1 hr
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): -1
tom, dick and harry
just a note - some nice expressions here!


Explanation:
I interpet ‘inviting every Tom, Dick and Harry’ as inviting people without discernment, almost randomly, ‘everyone’ and ‘anyone’.

In which case, I opt for οποιοσδήποτε or Or η σάρα και η μάρα too

I didn’t know the expression « κουτσή Μαρία » How refreshingly un-PC ! (thought maybe I would feel differently if it were ‘koutsos Andreas’). How did this expression arise? Is it widely used?


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Note added at 1 hr 53 mins (2005-10-30 15:22:57 GMT)
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And why not κάθε καρυδιάς καρύδι as a colourful but non-offensive alternative !


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Note added at 4 hrs 0 min (2005-10-30 17:30:27 GMT)
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Thanks Nick for the clarifications !

Just for the record, I think the key concept for ‘every Tom, Dick and Harry’ is the lack of discernment. It does not necessarily convey a negative opinion on Tom, Dick or Harry .

In context (a hypothetical situation): if I were choosing people to invite to my wedding, and I told my fiancée that I wanted to invite 50 colleagues (ie not just those who are in the same office as me), she could answer, quite rightly, ‘You can’t invite every Tom Dick and Harry’. I wouldn’t take this badly but it would mean I would have to be more selective.

Hope this makes sense.


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Note added at 5 hrs 52 mins (2005-10-30 19:22:47 GMT)
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Oops what a wally I was. I didn’t realise that it had to be names of people. OK then calliope if it’s not negative then I agree with your suggestion!


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Note added at 5 hrs 56 mins (2005-10-30 19:26:47 GMT)
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And thank *you* in fact for the clarifications.


Andreas THEODOROU
Spain
Local time: 15:27
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Calliope Sofianopoulos (X): This is exactly what "Δεν μπορείς να καλέσεις και την κουτσή Μαρία" means. Nothing negative about it. Could be taken negatively by people who don't know the Greek culture and background of the particular expression.
2 hrs
  -> see my note
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