I am my beloved's and she is mine/ I am my beloved\'s and he is mine

Hebrew translation: ani la-ahuvati va-ahuvati li --- ani la-ahuvi va-ahuvi li

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:I am my beloved's and she is mine/ I am my beloved\'s and he is mine
Hebrew translation:ani la-ahuvati va-ahuvati li --- ani la-ahuvi va-ahuvi li
Entered by: John Kinory (X)

02:09 Apr 18, 2002
English to Hebrew translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: I am my beloved's and she is mine/ I am my beloved\'s and he is mine
to be used as a phrase
Travis Stewart
ani la-ahuvati va-ahuvati li --- ani la-ahuvi va-ahuvi li
Explanation:
First the original verse:

ani le-dodi ve-dodi li - this is the original from Song of Songs. It talks about a man. However, it is a bit archaic; you can use it in a poetical way, but unfortunately the word 'dodi' (my [male] beloved), from which the name David derives, now means 'my uncle' :-((


Modern version (stress shown in upper-case):

1. talking about a woman (beloved MUST be male or female in Hebrew):

aNI la-ahuvaTI va-ahuvaTI li

ani = I
la-ahuvati = to/for my (f.) beloved
va-ahuvati = and my (f.) beloved
li = to/for me


2. about a man:
aNI la-ahuVI va-ahuVI li

Similar :-)

It should always be la-, va- in this context, because of the first syllable of ahuvi/ahuvati. Most modern speakers, however, will say le-, ve-. It's a common and minor mistake.


If you/your browser can read Hebrew (set it under the View/Encoding menu in Explorer):

אני לאהובתי ואהובתי לי
אני לאהובי ואהובי לי


You can see that Hebrew is compact in the way that words join together, compared to English.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-04-18 12:09:11 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As Ted rightly says, the original verse is \"Dodi li ve\'ani lo\", meaning \"My beloved is mine and I am his\". So I turned it around for this question :-)
Selected response from:

John Kinory (X)
Local time: 19:23
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +8ani la-ahuvati va-ahuvati li --- ani la-ahuvi va-ahuvi li
John Kinory (X)


  

Answers


21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +8
ani la-ahuvati va-ahuvati li --- ani la-ahuvi va-ahuvi li


Explanation:
First the original verse:

ani le-dodi ve-dodi li - this is the original from Song of Songs. It talks about a man. However, it is a bit archaic; you can use it in a poetical way, but unfortunately the word 'dodi' (my [male] beloved), from which the name David derives, now means 'my uncle' :-((


Modern version (stress shown in upper-case):

1. talking about a woman (beloved MUST be male or female in Hebrew):

aNI la-ahuvaTI va-ahuvaTI li

ani = I
la-ahuvati = to/for my (f.) beloved
va-ahuvati = and my (f.) beloved
li = to/for me


2. about a man:
aNI la-ahuVI va-ahuVI li

Similar :-)

It should always be la-, va- in this context, because of the first syllable of ahuvi/ahuvati. Most modern speakers, however, will say le-, ve-. It's a common and minor mistake.


If you/your browser can read Hebrew (set it under the View/Encoding menu in Explorer):

אני לאהובתי ואהובתי לי
אני לאהובי ואהובי לי


You can see that Hebrew is compact in the way that words join together, compared to English.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-04-18 12:09:11 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As Ted rightly says, the original verse is \"Dodi li ve\'ani lo\", meaning \"My beloved is mine and I am his\". So I turned it around for this question :-)

John Kinory (X)
Local time: 19:23
PRO pts in pair: 43
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Theodore Fink: Very elucidative explanation, John. I always thought it was "Dodi li ve'ani lo"
48 mins
  -> Thanks! Actually, you are right; but that's My beloved is mine and I am his, so I turned it around :-)

agree  Sue Goldian
2 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Robi Guttman
4 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Yaara Di Segni: as always you give a thorough and clear explanation, very good!
5 hrs
  -> Thanks :-))

agree  EGB Translations
5 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Benny Lee (X)
12 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Michal Circolone
12 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  maya_kimch
5 days
  -> Thanks
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