sunny boy

05:27 Sep 9, 2003
English to Hebrew translations [Non-PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters / General
English term or phrase: sunny boy
He is a regular sunny boy: works from his beach front home, dives into his private backyard pool, etc.
(This description was provided by a German Jew who speaks perfect English. I don't know if all this is relevant, but at least I've given you all the info I have.)
Orly Har-Zion


Summary of answers provided
5 +1two approaches: Yeled hashemesh or well-known literary figure with similar traits
Leah Aharoni
5No such term
Tal Ganani (X)
4bakhur-shemesh
Eynat
4Yeled shemesh ילד שמש
Jonathan G (X)


  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
bakhur-shemesh


Explanation:
bakhur-shemesh

Eynat

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tal Ganani (X): While this is a literal translation, what does this mean? I've never heard this used, have you?
11 hrs
  -> It is called being creative - does that ring a far-off bell? Instead of being helpful, you have gone to the trouble of posting an entire 'suggestion' merely in order to attack mine ('don't be misled').
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14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
No such term


Explanation:
"bachur shemesh" is a literal translation, bachur=boy, shemesh=sun, but don't be misled: No such combination exists in the Hebrew language (at least not one that can be commonly heard).

Tal Ganani (X)
United States
Local time: 14:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in HebrewHebrew

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Eynat: You have already commented on my suggestion; now you are going to the trouble of posting an entire 'suggestion' which is merely an attack on mine ('don't be misled'). Let's see you come up with something better, instead of spending all this time disagreei
11 hrs
  -> It's not an attack -- the fact is that posting a term without mentioning that no such term exists and that you're being "creative" IS misleading -- even if not intentionally so.
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1 day 36 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Yeled shemesh ילד שמש


Explanation:
it is also a literal translation, but I believe it is self explanatory, especially when you have an explanation in the following part of the sentence. It is not very literary in the origin either. However, I propose that you ask a native German speaker if it exists in German, because people tend to create, unconsciously, in other languages expressions that exist in their native language, and so they create them by literally translating.

Jonathan G (X)
Local time: 20:58

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  alonra (X): this term is better then the first one though neither actually translate the meaning of the term. I do however agree that this term can be a free translation from a german (and even jewish) term.
1 hr

neutral  Eynat: Sunny boy sounds quite idiomatic in English.
1 hr

neutral  Tal Ganani (X): Maybe "sonny boy," as in "where do you think you're going, sonny boy?" -- not to be confused with "sunny boy," which I've only ever seen here.
14 hrs
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2 days 16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
two approaches: Yeled hashemesh or well-known literary figure with similar traits


Explanation:
A bit of research points out that Sunny Boy was a series of books written in the 1920s. The main character is a tot named Sunny Boy.

I have not been able to find an existing Hebrew translation.

There are two possible approaches. If you want the reader to understand the literary image, you should use a figure from Hebrew (or well-known English) literature that represents the character traits of Sunny boy (carefree lifestyle).

Approach 2 - Your phrase makes it very clear what a sunny boy is and the literal translation of Yeled Hashemesh will enhance the imagery of carefree life.

Good luck in your decision.

Leah Aharoni
Local time: 21:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Dvash: Pampered or well taken care of are words that could substitute for sunny in "sunny boy". You might try looking for something that captures the nature of "sunny boy". I don't believe a literal translation would work well.
77 days
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