goodbye

Hindi translation: Namaste Ji, mein tumse/aapse kal miloonga/miloongee

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:goodbye
Hindi translation:Namaste Ji, mein tumse/aapse kal miloonga/miloongee
Entered by: chopra_2002

00:24 Feb 20, 2003
English to Hindi translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: goodbye
goodbye.I\'ll see you tomorrow.
erick
Namaste Ji, mein tumse/aapse kal miloonga/miloongee
Explanation:
-

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Note added at 2003-02-20 04:29:30 (GMT)
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The literal alternative of bidding *goodbye* is *alvida* but it is very rarely used and it is not very much in circulation.

Instead, if we intend to say goodbye to someone, we simply say *namaste* OR *namaste ji*. Please note that *ji* is used to give respect to that person.

We can say * mein tumse/aapse kal miloonga/miloongi* in respect of *I\'ll see you tomorrow*. *Tumse* will be used if we are saying this to someone younger or close to us, otherwise *aapse* will be used. *Miloonga* will be used if speaker is male and *Miloongee* will be used in case of female speaker.
Selected response from:

chopra_2002
India
Local time: 20:37
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +2Namaste Ji, mein tumse/aapse kal miloonga/miloongee
chopra_2002
5 +1achha
lingoage --
5Bida
Sanjay Ray
3"alvidaa "
satish krishna itikela


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Bida


Explanation:
It can be
Bida or
Albida
or Shubharatri. The later is said in the evening

Sanjay Ray
India
Local time: 20:37
Native speaker of: Native in BengaliBengali
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Namaste Ji, mein tumse/aapse kal miloonga/miloongee


Explanation:
-

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-02-20 04:29:30 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The literal alternative of bidding *goodbye* is *alvida* but it is very rarely used and it is not very much in circulation.

Instead, if we intend to say goodbye to someone, we simply say *namaste* OR *namaste ji*. Please note that *ji* is used to give respect to that person.

We can say * mein tumse/aapse kal miloonga/miloongi* in respect of *I\'ll see you tomorrow*. *Tumse* will be used if we are saying this to someone younger or close to us, otherwise *aapse* will be used. *Miloonga* will be used if speaker is male and *Miloongee* will be used in case of female speaker.

chopra_2002
India
Local time: 20:37
Native speaker of: Native in HindiHindi
PRO pts in pair: 765
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Singh: Well explained.I think we can also use Phir milenge for Good Bye. In daily life the most commonly used sentence for Goodbye. I 'll see you tomorrow is Accha kal milenege (with friends).
35 mins
  -> Singh, thanks for valuable suggestions!

agree  PRAKASH SHARMA: Both langclinic and singhs' responses makes a perfect translation of the given word and phrase.Analyse the answers and get the right one yourself ,mr.erick.
1 day 13 hrs
  -> Yes, of course, he suggested a very good alternative!
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
achha


Explanation:
'achha, mein aapse kal milonga.'

or

'achha, mein aapse kal milonge.'

'achha' is not an exact translation of goodbye. it is i general term used while saying goodbye. The exact translation would be- 'alvida'.

the change in sentences is due to change in gender- the first being male and second female.


lingoage --
Local time: 20:37

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Dr. Puneet Bisaria
1 day 6 hrs
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
"alvidaa "


Explanation:
This is an expression used for whishing good for some one who u are leaving and wishing to meet him again on another day.

satish krishna itikela
India
Local time: 20:37
Native speaker of: Native in TeluguTelugu, Native in HindiHindi
PRO pts in pair: 19
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