steam vs. vapor

15:35 Nov 20, 2016
English to Italian translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Medical: Pharmaceuticals
English term or phrase: steam vs. vapor
Ciao a tutti,

recentemente mi sono imbattuta in un dispositivo che vaporizza
Perossido di idrogeno.
Facendo ricerca sul web, mi risulta che "steam" sia solo applicabile
quando lo stato di vapore si riferisce all' acqua portata appunto allo
stato di vapore, mentre "vapor" a tutti gli altri elementi.
Tuttavia nella letteratura trattata precedentemente viene sempre usato
, ed è stato approvato steam....tuttavia il dubbio rimane.
Chiedo gentilmente dei chiarimenti in merito.

grazie mille
Paola Bisio
Italy
Local time: 18:07


Summary of answers provided
4vapor
Milortech
Summary of reference entries provided
Diffferenece between Water Vapor & Steam
Francesca Bruno

Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
vapor


Explanation:
Direi che dipende dal contesto.
Se il testo si riferisce al processo di vaporizzazione, dovresti tradurre vapor decomposition, perche` il perossido di idrogeno ovviamente non e` acqua.
Una volta che la decomposizione e` avvenuta, il perossido di idrogeno si decompone in acqua sotto forma di vapore ed ossigeno. Cosi` se il testo si riferisce al prodotto di vaporizzazione, dovresti invece tradurre water steam.

Milortech
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:07
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Joseph Tein: Si ... e qui non sappiamo il contesto.
1 hr
  -> It would be great if we could read the phrase/paragraph.
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Reference comments


2 hrs
Reference: Diffferenece between Water Vapor & Steam

Reference information:
Key Difference: Water vapor is little water droplets that exist in the air, while steam is water heated to the point that it turns into gas. In simplified science, both are referred to as the gaseous state of water. Steam is usually white or translucent in nature, while water vapor can be clear or translucent. Steam is believed to be basically water vapor at a higher temperature.

Water vapor and steam are two things that we come across everyday even if we are not aware of it. These states of water happen everyday during the water cycle. However, many people are often confused as to what is the difference between water vapor and steam. Are they different from each other? Or just different terms that refer to the same thing? While, many suggest that water vapor and steam are

the same; there is a slight difference between them.

Water vapor is little water droplets that exist in the air, while steam is water heated to the point that it turns into gas. In simplified science, both are referred to as the gaseous state of water. However, the main difference between them lies in temperature. Now, let’s try and explain this using an example. When a person leaves their clothes to air dry, the water from the clothes evaporate slowly as the temperature around the cloth changes. This is evaporation a form of water vapor. The water becomes absorbed in the air which leaves the clothes dry. Now, when we put a kettle of water to boil, after a moment we see the water lessening and a few wisps of white escaping the kettle. This is steam. Steam is usually white or translucent in nature, while water vapor can be clear or translucent.


    Reference: http://www.differencebetween.info/difference-between-water-v...
Francesca Bruno
Italy
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in category: 6
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