That which does not kill me makes me stronger.

Latin translation: caedit

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:beat
Latin translation:caedit

20:47 Feb 11, 2006
English to Latin translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Philosophy
English term or phrase: That which does not kill me makes me stronger.
verb for kill
Tiffany
quod me non interficit, id me firmiorem facit.
Explanation:
Lit., "What does not kill me, that strengthens me".

One could use many synonymes for 'kill', such as 'caedit' ('beat' or 'stab to death'), 'occidit' ('slay', esp. in a fight), conficit ('do away with, finish off'), '(e)necat' ('slaughter, kill brutally'), 'trucidat' ('butcher'), 'iugulat' ('cut the throat'), 'obtruncat' ('cut to pieces'), and more still. But 'interficit' is the ordinary translation of 'kill' in this context.

Likewise, you could substitute 'corroborat' ('make strong, strengthen', which carries the nuance of 'make strong as an oak', as this verb derives from 'robur', which means any hard wood, but especially oak) or 'confirmat', which means the same, 'con-' here being an intensive prefix.

The order 'Id quod me non interficit me firmiorem facit' is also correct and possible, if a little less common.

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Note added at 2006-02-11 21:51:38 (GMT)
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As Flavio notes, this question has been asked and answered seferal times, including by myself, now that I think of it.

Members\' glossaries really are worth searching!
Selected response from:

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Local time: 06:05
Grading comment
Thank you for the explanation/reference. It was very helpful to also know that you were 100% confident in your answer.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5quod me non interficit, id me firmiorem facit.
Joseph Brazauskas
3 +2quod non me destruit, me nutrit
Kirill Semenov
3 +1Id quod me non interimit confirmat
Robert Tucker (X)


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Id quod me non interimit confirmat


Explanation:
is suggested at:

http://www.geocities.com/alcovey1/freethought2.html

and:

Quod me non necat firmat

at:

http://omega.cohums.ohio-state.edu/mailing_lists/LATIN-L/200...

Robert Tucker (X)
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:05
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Joseph Brazauskas
49 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
that which does not kill me makes me stronger.
quod non me destruit, me nutrit


Explanation:
(c) Flavio Benedetti

http://www.proz.com/kudoz/361281

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Note added at 13 mins (2006-02-11 21:00:45 GMT)
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Also:

quod non me interficit me confirmat

see http://www.proz.com/kudoz/157705

Kirill Semenov
Ukraine
Local time: 13:05
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Flavio Ferri-Benedetti: ;)
40 mins

agree  Joseph Brazauskas: I like 'nutrit'.
50 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

59 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
quod me non interficit, id me firmiorem facit.


Explanation:
Lit., "What does not kill me, that strengthens me".

One could use many synonymes for 'kill', such as 'caedit' ('beat' or 'stab to death'), 'occidit' ('slay', esp. in a fight), conficit ('do away with, finish off'), '(e)necat' ('slaughter, kill brutally'), 'trucidat' ('butcher'), 'iugulat' ('cut the throat'), 'obtruncat' ('cut to pieces'), and more still. But 'interficit' is the ordinary translation of 'kill' in this context.

Likewise, you could substitute 'corroborat' ('make strong, strengthen', which carries the nuance of 'make strong as an oak', as this verb derives from 'robur', which means any hard wood, but especially oak) or 'confirmat', which means the same, 'con-' here being an intensive prefix.

The order 'Id quod me non interficit me firmiorem facit' is also correct and possible, if a little less common.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2006-02-11 21:51:38 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As Flavio notes, this question has been asked and answered seferal times, including by myself, now that I think of it.

Members\' glossaries really are worth searching!

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Local time: 06:05
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 16
Grading comment
Thank you for the explanation/reference. It was very helpful to also know that you were 100% confident in your answer.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



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