(Time) will pass

Latin translation: tempus transibit

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Time will pass
Latin translation:tempus transibit
Entered by: Luis Antonio de Larrauri

10:25 Dec 13, 2008
English to Latin translations [Non-PRO]
Philosophy
English term or phrase: (Time) will pass
i want this phrase translated and have been told that the furture tense of "to pass" is Transibit or Praeteribit. What is the difference and which one would you use for saying this phrase ?
andy
tempus transibit
Explanation:
They are synonimes, at least in this context (referred to time). Examples with praetereo (praeter + eo, eo = go, so it means to go further, beyond, to pass by):
nec praetiritum tempus revertitur (past time never comes back)
iam praeteriit aestas The summer is already gone.

With transeo
Dies transeunt: the days pass
imperium brevi transiturum: empire that will soon pass, that will not last much.

I see "transeo" is used in present and in future more than "pratereo", so it is more suitable for the idea you want to translate. Indeed, "praetereo" gave "preterit" in English, and similiar forms in other languages, which means "past", so is more suitable to express an idea on past things.
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Luis Antonio de Larrauri
Local time: 18:02
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5 +2tempus transibit
Luis Antonio de Larrauri


  

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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
(time) will pass
tempus transibit


Explanation:
They are synonimes, at least in this context (referred to time). Examples with praetereo (praeter + eo, eo = go, so it means to go further, beyond, to pass by):
nec praetiritum tempus revertitur (past time never comes back)
iam praeteriit aestas The summer is already gone.

With transeo
Dies transeunt: the days pass
imperium brevi transiturum: empire that will soon pass, that will not last much.

I see "transeo" is used in present and in future more than "pratereo", so it is more suitable for the idea you want to translate. Indeed, "praetereo" gave "preterit" in English, and similiar forms in other languages, which means "past", so is more suitable to express an idea on past things.


Luis Antonio de Larrauri
Local time: 18:02
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Spanish
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  alcaeus
2 days 41 mins
  -> Ago gratias, Josephe!

agree  Sergey Kudryashov
8 days
  -> Ago gratias, Sergey!
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